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PAGE 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16,2008 



CROSSWORD PUZZLES 



ACROSS 
t Use a 

QTip 

5 Canadian 
♦lag 
symbol 

9 Sutler a 
reces- 
sion? 

12 Green 
land 

13 Eli's 
school 

14 Born 

15 Under a 
spell 

17Counc's 
employer 

18 Quit 

1 9 Vacant. 
as a flat 

21 Doctor 
who 
fought 
007 

22 Copy, (or 
short 

24 Hastened 

27 Scarlet 

28 Largest 
ol the 
seven 

31 Family 

32 In r\eed ot 
repair 

33 Remnarcl 

34 Pari 
ol the 
toot? 

36 Chesa 
peake. 
eg 



37 Toteboard 
stats 

38 West- 
minster 
building 

40 Qtr ol a 
bushel 

41 Wil 
43 Blood- 

bank 
supply 

47 Venom- 
ous 
viper 

48 In 
ciphertext 

51 Sandra or 
Ruby 

52 Use a 
paper 
towel 

53 Tittle 

54 Toss into 
the mm 

55 Go no 
farther 

56 Unwanted 
e-mail 



DOWN 

1 Crystal 
gazer 

2 Som mo- 
tor's 
sugges- 
tion 

3 Curved 
lines 

4 Trailing 

5 Vanessa s 
sister 

6 Dine 
on 

7 Hearty 
quail 

8 Sick and 
lired 

9 In the 
envelope 

10 Actress 
Neuwirth 

11 Unsur 
passed 

16 Past 
20 Gun 

lovers' 

org 



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22 Pass the 
baton 

23 Vortex 

24 Tackle 
moguls 

25 ATM 
access 
no. 

26 Set up a 
bivouac 

27 Judicial 
garb 

29 Ttiird 
party 
(Abbr ) 

30 Billboards 
35 Showtime 

alterna- 
tive 
37 Giraffes 
cousins 

39 7-Down 
etal 

40 Thickness 

41 "Mary — 
Little 
Lamb" 

42 Second- 
hand 

43 Victim 

44 Red light 

45 "I never 
— man I 
didn't 
like" 

46 Leading 
man? 

49 Little 
louse 

50 Book- 
keeper 
(Abbr) 



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ACROSS 
1 Picnic 

invader 
4 Move 

spirally 
8 Italy's 

Silhouette 

12 Tarzan's 
son 

13 Bound 

14 Giftord's 
successor 

15 Seles 
contem- 
porary 

17 As well 

18 Growths 
ot bamboo 

19 Neutral 
color 

21 Perform 

22 "Dfeam- 
giris" 

Oscar 
winner 
26 Keep labs 
on 

29 Gender 

30 Lamb's 
dam 

31 'Be still" 

32 Tool 
set 

33 Encounter 

34 Savings 
plan 
acronym 

35 Send 
immedi- 
ately 



36 They get 
in the 
whey 

37 "Alias- 
star 

39 UK 
(hers 

40 McKinley's 
first lady 

41 Under the 
wire 

45 Tar's 

bars? 
48 First 

name of 

15.22-. 

and 37- 

Across 

50 Thai 
hurts!' 

51 Jason's 
ship 

52 To and — 

53 Help a 
hood 

54 Fit snugly 
inside 



55 'Abso- 
lutely" 

DOWN 

1 Basic 

learning 

2 Ham's 
dad 

3 Proof- 
reader's 
find 

4 Minor 
problem 

5 Leavening 
agent 

6 Snitch 

7 Dis- 
paraging 
word 

8 Maverick's 
lack 

9 Tin Man's 
need 

10 Photo — 

11 Confucian 
pnnciple 

16 Insect 



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23 Prognosti- 
cator 

24 Due 

25 Trawler 
equipment 

26 Henry 
Clay or 
Daniel 
Webster 

27 Emana- 
tion 

28 Despot 

29 Touch- 
down 
score 

32 Maestro 
Herbert 
von — 

33 Soldier s 
civvies 

35 Nourished 

36 Lacks the 
ability 

38 Dark 
period 

39 Fifth day 
Chnstmas 

gift 

42 Dubious 

43 Unembel- 
lished 

44 Cupid's 
alter ego 

45 Slithery 
squeezer 

46 Difficulty 

47 "Rocks" 
49 Before 



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" 







Start Small with New 
Year's Resolutions 




Several weeks ago I was 

having a conversation with my 
sister on the phone and be- 
tween shar- 
ing our 
Christmas 
lists and talk- 
ing about 
our lives, we 
somehow 
ended up 
talking about 
the flawed 
nature of 
New Year's 
resolutions 

We de- 
cided that no matter what, 
the resolutions wc make as 
the ball drops are futile and 
doomed from the start. 

New Year's resolutions 
can express the desire to stop 
smoking, lose weight, or be- 
come more organized for the 
coming school year 

No matter what they want 
to fix you can tell a lot about a 
person from what their resolu- 
tions are. 

If their resolution involves 
participation in more physi- 
cal activity, it is easy to assume 
they are lazy and just don't 
like to get off the couch How- 
ever, this is not the end of the 
story In addition to their con- 
fession of laziness, your friend 
also has expressed a desire to 
make a change in their life. 
It's not necessarily an issue of 
what they want to change, it 
still shows they are trying to 
improve their quality "I living. 

No matter how excited 
someone is about their reso- 
lutions, the sad reality of the 
vows is they are doomed to 
fail. When is the last time you 
actually achieved the goal 
you set as the ball dropped 7 
The problem is not the peo- 
ple making the resolutions but 
the resolutions people make 
Typically, the established goals 
are unrealistic and generally 
cannot be accomplished over- 
night. 



Look at the facts If your 

resolution is to go to the gym 
and you're not going at all, 
chances are good you're not 
gumg to start going just be 
cause your emotions got the 
best of you one night. 

If you are tired of the feel 
ing you get when you real- 
ize you again failed to achieve 
your goal, the solution is here. 
Start small and set a resolution 
that you know you can keep 

After 24 years of resolu 
tion missteps, my older sis- 
ter finally got the right idea 
this year with her pledge She 
doesn't want to run a mara- 
thon or lose twenty pounds; 
she simply wants to memo- 
rize the words to Billy Joel's 
hit song "We Didn't Start the 
Fire" 

You might read that and 
scoff at her lack of drive or 
motivation, but look at it from 
another angle. 

After she can finally re- 
cite the words and perform 
at karaoke night, the satisfac- 
tion from achieving her goal 
will be a welcomed change 
from the earlier feelings of re- 
gret and remorse, I can see her 
breathing easier as the chains 
that once prevented her from 
achieving her dreams fall away 
and there is no more weight 
on her shoulders 

More importantly, she will 
have the added confidence to 
lake an even bigger step when 
(he sparkling wine is popped 
next year. She will know that 
she has the ability to achieve 
her dreams 

The moral of the story is 
to start small and work your 
way up It isn't loo late lo set 
some pre-year goals, so if you 
start in 200o. you will be able 
to climb Mount Everest in the 
year 2068. Good Luck. 



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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 3 



Students share personal experiences to earn grades, battle procrastination 




CORENE 
BRISENDINE 



It's time to return to class, 
see old friends, make new ones 
and spend hours upon hours 
studying - or 
perhaps not. 

To help 
students stay 
focused and 
avoid the pit- 
falls of mid- 
night cram- 
ming ses- 
sions, here 
axe ten tips to 
help achieve 
good grades " 
this semester 

TREAT YOUR BRAIN 

The brain is a muscle, even 
though most people don't think 
of it as one. Your body produc- 
es specific measurable enzymes 
when you are tired, dehydrat- 
ed, or malnourished Studying 
gives your cranial muscle quite 
a workout and, it needs plenty 
of rest Getting eight hours of 
sleep every night helps maintain 
your cognitive thinking power- 
house and prepares it for anoth- 
er day of exercise. 

You also need to feed your 
brain Breakfast jump-starts 
your metabolism and awakens 
those synaptic pathways first 
Oiing in the morning. A bowl 
of cereal makes an inexpen- 
sive, quick meal anytime, but 
don't forget about it early in the 
morning. 

ORGANIZING NOTES 

Most students take notes 

during lectures, but they neglect 
to re copy or organize them lat- 
er By taking a few minutes after 
class to organize your notes, it 
will help you understand what 
yuu have written, and you might 
jl so remember a lew important 
points you missed while frantic 
ly scribbling. When you review 
them for the exam, your notes 
will be a useful study guide, not 
incoherent hen scratches on pa- 
per 

Making or using flash cards 
is a great way to study formu- 
las, important dates, names and 
events You can purchase flash - 
cards for foreign language, his- 
tory, philosophy, medical termi 
oology, math and many other 
subjects. 

Online. Waldenbooks 
cam offers the largest selection 
with more than 3,000 differ- 
ent types of flashcards flash 
cardexchangecam offers flash- 
cards created by other people 
and tools to create your own 



online 

Don't limit your flashcard 
library to just what you can pur- 
chase - make your own. Index 
cards are inexpensive and while 
you organize those notes, write 
the key points, names, dates and 
events on an index card 

Another great way to gain 
er information during a lecture 
is to record it, but always get 
your professor's permission be 
fore recording any lecture Re- 
cording the lecture makes it eas- 
ier to make those flashcards be 
cause you can pause or rewind 
it to catch every detail 

EXERCISE 

While exercising your 
brain, don't forget to exercise 
your body. Exercising increas- 
es blood flow to your brain and 
maintains your cardiovascular 
system Increased blood How 
means increased oxygen to your 
brain and allows you to study 
more without getting tired Per- 
forming a cardiovascular work 
out - like walking, running or 
cycling - for 15 to 30 minutes 
every day gives your mind and 
body the ability to handle the 
stress of college life 

While working out, instead 
of listening to music, throw on 
that recorded lecture or notes 
you dictated to keep you study 
ing without staring at a book. 

IMPROVING STUDY HABITS 

Study groups provide a way 
not only to visit with friends but 
also to gather information you 
might have missed If you didn't 
understand some portion of the 
lecture, perhaps one of your fel- 
low students did 

If you are unable to find a 
study group or organize one, tu 
toring is a great option The Ac- 
ademic Assistance Center in 
201 Leisure Hall provides free 
tutoring to all K State students. 
The Educational Supportive 
Services, located at 201 Hullon 
Hall, also provides free tutor- 
ing to qualifying applicants You 
can also ask your professors for 
tutors within their departments. 

Study for short periods of 
time Study one subject for 15 
to 20 minutes, and then switch 
subjects. 

Once you complete your 
studying tools, organized notes, 
flashcards. dictation tapes, 
spend time every day studying 
each subject. While eating, re- 
view your notes While watch- 
ing an episode of your favorite 
nightly show, mute those an 





MICHLYNN 
ROSE 



nations by Jonathan Knight | COLLEGIAN 



noying commercials and pull 
out the flashcards 

Kristinu Schnen. a sopho- 
more in modern languages, said 
she studies right before bed 
She said she has no other dis 
tractions before sleep, which 
gives her brain the time needed 
to process the information she 
teamed that day. 

Garett Koop, a doctor at 
Aligned Roup Chiropractic in 
Manhattan said. "While spend- 
ing hours hunched over a desk 
trying to retain all the informa- 
tion, make sure you spend time 
working on posture. Stand up 
straight every half hour, roll 
your shoulders back and stretch 
all your neck muscles This will 
help relieve the stress in your 
neck and shoulders and help 
p rev en I tension headaches" 

Everyone learns in three 
MM by listening, by reading 
and by doing. By incorporat 




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ing all three into your studying 
habits, you increase your learn- 
ing immensely. Good luck this 
semester and remember: study 
wiser, not harder 



(of en« Briwndirw is i junior in pr* 
journalism and mm communkattoni. 
Send comments to optmon | ipub.ktu. 



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1 



Procrastination is a 
common battle in my life 
that has only gotten worse 
since I en- 
tered my 
last year 
of college 

"Col 
lege peo- 
ple are 
busy with 
jobs, 
classes 
and oth- 
er respon- 
sibilities. 
Find a 

balance Graduation is the 
ultimate goal," said 
Rachael Robinson -Keiling. 
counseling services psychol- 
ogy intern. 

'Procrastination feeds 
on itself until it becomes the 
big elephant in the room. 
she said. "Use time manage 
ment and map out your se- 
mester and time. Look at 
pre-planning" 

She said procrastina- 
tion is not just about lazi- 
ness. Some people fear not 
doing well, or they think 
they will never get to the 
end so they don't start. In 
my personal case, I want 
things to be perfect but I 
don't know where to start. 

Drew Dobbeleare, M 
nior in park management 
and conservation, said he 
procrastinates on an every 
day basis out of habit and 
perfectionism 

"I don't know how to 
get an assignment started so 
I wait for hours on end and 
then get it done." he said 
"If an assignment is due in a 
week or so I'll wait until the 
day before to do it. More in- 
teresting stuff pups up and 
I do that and eventually get 
around to getting everything 
done I hate to admit it, but 
there was one assignment I 
didn't gel done because of 
procrastination" 

To avoid procrastina- 
tion this semester. Dobbe- 
leare said if he has a month 
to do an assignment he is 
going to do it within the 
first two weeks and then 
have free time 

My advice on avoiding 
procrastination is to join a 
study group or get a tutor 
This makes you accountable 
for your work Write a to-do 
list - but keep it short and 
simple 1 write long lists and 



then feel overwhelmed 

"Long lists seem in 
surmountable and make 
you think, 'Why am I go- 
ing to even start 7 ' Focus on 
a small part of the list not 
the whole thing," Robinson- 
Ketlingsaid 

Whitney Slot Is, sopho- 
more in social science and 
international studies, said 
she procrastinates if she has 
significant time before an 
assignment ur task is due. 
Stotts said the main rea- 
son she procrastinates is be- 
cause of other priorities 

"I think there is more 
important things like 
friends." she said. "You only 
live so long so you have to 
take those moments." 

To stay on lop of her 
school work she said: "I get 
into the habit in the begin- 
ning and then I can slack 
more at the end of the se- 
mester 1 just gel it done or 
split it up throughout the 
week." 

In Overcoming tto 
crastination by Neil Fiore, 
he explains guilt-free play 
will lead to quality work. In 
the book. Fiore said work- 
aholics and procrastinators 
need to stop putting off life 
and reap in the benefits of 
play 

i p li lit -free play is 
based on the seeming para- 
dox that in order to do pro- 
ductive, high-quality work 
on important projects, you 
must stop putting off living 
and engage wholehearted- 
ly in recreation and relax- 
ation," according to Fiore's 
book 

To have guilt -free play, 
he suggests that you work 
for short periods of time 
and give yourself rewards 
more frequently 

Piore explains how to 
overcome procrastination 
by using what he calls the 
unschedule: a weekly cat 
endar of planned exercise, 
chores, sleep, meals, class- 
es, appointments and other 
important events. This un- 
schedule allows you to re- 
alize the small amount of 
time you have tu actual- 
ly work on projects, so you 
will start earlier. 



Mkhlynn Rot« ii a ten lot in print 
journalism. Sendcommtnttto 

vnspub.kiu.tdu. 



1st Lt. Malqorzata Bujak, RN, BSN 
Brooke Army Medical Center, Texas 



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■■ 



PAGE 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2008 



K-State Proud continues 
campaign to help students 



By Nicole Johnston 
KANSAS RJtll O0U&3AM 

The K State Proud cam- 
paign is back for the second 
noond of inspiring students, 
hoping to leave their legacy at 
K State and show their pride 
ihrough philanthropy 

"Each day on campus, you 
are likely to come across at least 
one student wearing a black T- 
shirt bearing the words K State 
Proud," said Molly Hainm. stu 
dent foundation member and 
senior in English "Yet, in the 
past year this shin has done 
much more than announce 
wildcat pride." 

Though many students pur- 
chased the shirts for the home 
basketball game against the 
University of Kansas last sea- 
son, Hamm said the shirt has 
mure meaning 

All donations for the Proud 
campaign fund the Student Op 



portunity Awards The inaugu 
ral campaign raised more than 
$62,000. creating two types of 
awards K-Slatc Hero awards 
and K -State Proud awards 

"This year, K-State Proud is 
back, but not in black," Hamm 
said "The K-Stale Proud stu- 
dent campaign saw the over- 
whelming response of students 
interested in helping students 
and is continuing in its second 
year to raise funds for Student 
Opportunity Awards" 

The 2008 co-chairs Megan 
Dwyer, junior in history, and 
Cole Galyon, junior in busi- 
ness administration, are lead- 
ing a campus advisory board of 
30 student leaders, along with 
members of Student Founda- 
tion, to plan this year's student 
campaign 

"K-State Proud is a way 
for our campus community to 
come together and raise funds 
for our fellow students through 



Student Opportunity Awards," 

Dwyer said. "All contributions 
are improving, and will contin- 
ue to improve, the lives of many 
K Stale students When you see 
a K-State Proud shirt on cam- 
pus, vmi know that person be- 
lieves in the K- State family 

During the week of Feb 
18-22. students can make dona- 
lions to K-Slate Proud in the K- 
Stale Student Union. Minimum 
donations of $10 will qualify 
students for a gift - a charcoal 
grey T-shirt with a new logo 

Hamm said the 2008 cam- 
paign will culminate ai Brum 
lage Coliseum during the In- 
state. University of Texas men's 
basketball game Feb 25. 

One hundred percent of all 
donations to the student cam 
paign fund the Student Oppor- 
tunity Awards Student Oppor- 
tunity Awards can help any K 
Stale student in an unexpected 
situation that could potentially 




PH0TOI Ol RIKSV 0FK5U FOUNDATION 

Willi* th« Wildcat and members of the student foundation talk with students about making donations to 
the K-State Proud campaign 



jeopardize Iheir future. 

Awards are distributed in 
two categories 

K-State Hero Awards rec- 
ognize students who have 
shown an outstanding commit 
mem lo K State through cam 
pus leadership, community ser- 
vice or other areas of student 



life. 

K- Si ate Proud Awards are 
allocated by a student alloca- 
tions committee to help stu- 
dents who are struggling to 
make ends meet and have ex- 
hausted all oOier forms of fi- 
nancial assistance Students 
can nominate themselves for an 



award, or they can nominate a 
fellow student Faculty mem- 
bers are encouraged to nomi- 
nate deserving students K- Stale 
Proud awards have no applica- 
tion deadline; awards are made 
year-round Visit umjm.iound. 
ksuedu/studentfoundatian to 
apply 



Variety of intersession courses offer different perspectives, lessons 



It Kenneth Laudwehr 
presented graphic photographs 
from the BTK case in Wichita 
Images and 
accounts of 
serial mur- 
derers glazed 
the overhead 
screen for 
Iwo weeks 
straight 

Small 
groups of 
classmates 
read several 

voluminous 

biographies 

of men and women who killed 




ADHIANNE 
DEWEESE 



lens and hundreds of people 
They wrote 10-page papers 
about the books and gave pre 
sentalions lo their peers. 

During my winter break in 
2006 07, 1 opted to not spend 
my days lounging in front of 
the television and sleeping In- 
stead, I experienced the most 
intense two weeks of my aca- 
demic life in Social Construc- 
tion of Senal Murder 

Some students might think 
attending four-hour el- 
and studying during a break 
sounds like an academic nighi- 
marc more than an opportuni- 
ty All courses listed in the K- 



State catalog are fair game for 
intersession, according to K 
Slate's Division of Continuing 
Education Web site. 

However, intercession is a 
lime at K-State when only cer 
lain courses are offered Class- 
es like A History til Amcrn.ui 
Sex and Body Image; form 
sic Medicine and the Investiga- 
tion of Death; and Understand- 
ing Islam were offered during 
the January intersession, which 
ends today. 

Many of my Social Con- 
struction of Senal Murder 
classmates were nol sociology 
or criminology majors In fact. 



during a pop quiz about char- 
acteristics of a serial murder- 
er on the first day of class, only 
one student got a perfect score 
- and he was an engineering 
major. 

During a two -week period, 
my academically diverse class- 
mates talked about reasons 
they decided to take a class 
during winter break. For some, 
they only needed one more 
class lo graduate But for oth- 
ers, sociology and serial mur 
der were topics thai fascinat- 
ed them Intersession provided 
a perfect opportunity lo learn 
more about the subject 



We lived, breathed and ate the- 
ories and anecdotes about se- 
rial murder. Each class period 
presenled itself with a different 
experience 

Susan Williams, associ- 
ate professor of sociology and 
Social Construction of Seri- 
al Murder instructor, once told 
my classmates and I that we 
would lean) more about our- 
selves during the class than 
about the actual serial murder- 
ers 

"The course is really about 
the killers themselves and also 
about us as a culture - us as a 
society," Williams said in a Dec. 



22 K-State Media Relations 
and Marketing press release. 

"I cannot teach anybody 
anything," the Greek philoso- 
pher Socrates once said "1 can 
only make them think" 

K-State's inlersession 
challenges its students to do 
the same; learn an immense 
amount of knowledge in a 
shortened semester, but more 
importantly, think for them- 
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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGES 



Online listings receive positive feedback from students, Varney's 



By Adrlann* DeWeeie 
KANSAS STATU OLLfil.IAN 

The university's offi- 
cial bookstore's online text- 
book listing went well during 
its first full semester in op 
l' rut in n. said one bookstore 
manager 

"We didn't have any- 
body complain about it, and 
I think the students like to 
have the information at their 
fingertips," said Steve Levin, 
K-Slale Student Union Book 
store manager "It's hard to 
say sales- wise what we did 
We were slightly down, but 
we think that might have had 
more about the parking than 
anything." 

Since 2001, Varney's has 
leased its locations in the 
K State Student Union and 
Aggieville to K-State. mak- 
ing it the university's official 
bookstore, according to an 
April 20, 2007, Collegian ar 
tide 

VARNEY'S ONLINE TEXT- 
BOOK LISTING 

K State faculty members 
were asked to report their 
spring semester textbook in 
formation by Oct. 12, 2007, 
Levin said 

"You have good years 
and bad years," Levin said 
"This would be probably one 
of the slower reporting sea- 
sons that we've had 

"We always want to be 
able to have the information 
from the professors as soon 
as we can That's always our 
goal. But as far as posting 
it, we always try to have the 
most accurate information 
on the site as we can." 

The textbook lists are 
available through www.ks- 
su book store com and www. 
shopvarneys.com Tex t boo k 
titles, authors. International 
Standard Book Numbers and 
book editions are provided 
through listings of academ- 
ic departments, section num- 
bers and specific K Slate in- 
structors. 

"When we put stuff into 
our internal systems, we just 
put it on our Web site, so it's 
really not a complex thing," 
Levin said about the online 
posting process "It's just try- 
ing to verify that what we 
have is correct " 

Varney's and the Union 
Bookstore employ a 30- 
pcrson textbook staff. Ten 
people actively accumulate 
and verify textbook infor- 
mation with K- State faculty 
members, as well as order the 
books and provide the lists 
online, Levin said 

Three information tech- 
nology specialists also help 
with Varney's Web sites. 
Ltvis said 

Varney's spends about 
$200,000 a year in develop 
ing its book lists, according 
to an Aug 18. 2007. Colle- 
gian article. 

Cost Factors include em 
ployee salaries. comput 
er software and follow-up 
with K State faculty, said Jeff 
Levin, Varney's co-owner, in 
the Aug. 18 article 



hi! Levin also said in 
the article that the new 
textbook listing's cost is min- 
imal because the bookstore 
already has its distance- 
learning book lists online 

CLAFLIN BOOKS 
AND COPIES 

Clafl in Books and Cop- 
ies, an independently owned 
bookstore on Claflin Road, 
also provides textbooks for 
K Stale students 

Stormy Kennedy. Claflin 
Books and Copies co-own- 
er, said the store has provid 
ed textbooks for about eight 
years and works with the 
College of Arts and Scienc 
es academic departments and 
ihe School of Family Studies 
and Human Services. 

Unlike Varney's and 
the Union Bookstore. Claf- 
lin Books and Copies does 
not have a specific textbook 
deadline for faculty mem- 
bers 

"There is no deadline be 
cause we know that some- 
times things get shifted 
around in the department and 
that sometimes they might 
have emergencies." Kennedy 
said 

Claflin Books docs not 
employ a separate textbook 
support staff, Kennedy said 
She also said the bookstore 
does not have an online text- 
book listing and does not 
plan to include one in the 
near future 

"We're going to keep it 
mostly in store and in large 
part it's because we want the 
students to come in and get 
to know us." she said 

TEXTBOOK COSTS 

Publishers calculate Var- 
ney's textbook prices, Steve 
Levin said. 

"The book is priced by 
the publisher, and we can 
price it lower, whieh we do." 
he said. 

Textbooks found at low 
er prices on the Internet usu- 
ally are older edition books. 
Levin said 

"We might have books 
that we no longer use on this 
campus, and we can sell them 
to wholesalers tor maybe 
$10, so we'll post them on 
the Internet for sale for $15 
because we'll make more 
money." Levin said, "and 
then students at other uni- 
versities will buy them from 
us. Thai's really how students 
are finding deals is that 
most of the books are from 
bookstores selling books they 
can't sell on their own cam 
pus." 

At Claflin Books, Kenne- 
dy said vendors and publish- 
ers also set the bookstore's 
textbook prices. 

"On the buyback, if the 
professor is going to be us- 
ing the textbook Ihe follow- 
ing semester then we can of 
fer more than what the used 
book vendors offer." Kennedy 
said. 

"Otherwise, we work 
with three used textbook 
vendors, and we try to give 
the highest price of the three 





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Jonathan Knight | K A NMS M A I l i < >l I M . I * x 
A Varney's employee stacks textbook', on the shelves in preparation for the beginning of school There are several options available to students 
for boytng books 



vendors It means a little bit 
more paperwork for us. but 
if we can give a dollar more 
back, that's what we'll do " 

Students should inform 
faculty members during the 
semester if (hey do not use an 
access code or CD that came 
with a textbook. Levin said. 

He said this helps en- 
sure used textbook buyback 
because the CDs and codes 
weren't used 

"The code really doesn't 
do anything." Levin said 
The code really is a way for 
the publisher to ensure that 
we'll have to buy new books 
j^ain because the book really 
is perfectly fine; it's just you 
can't use it again without the 

code.' 

A STUDENT-LED EFFORT 

During the mid-fall se 
mester, Student Senate mem- 
bers sent an e mail through 
ihe Office of the Provost Ifl 
faculty members informing 
them of the textbook dead- 
line, said Malt Wagner, stu 
dent body president and fifth - 
year student in management 
information systems Student 
Senate members also com- 
municate with Faculty Sen- 
ate about students' lextbuok 
needs 

Student Senate members 
will facilitate a discussion 
with students and Varney's 
officials at the beginning of 
the spring semesler about 
textbooks, Wagner said 

While an official date 
has not been set for the 
discussion, it will take place 
in the Union Courtyard. 

Student Governing Asso- 



ciation leaders organized the 
effort for online textbook list 
ing during the 2006-07 Stu- 
dent Senate term 

During fall 2006, 
University Relations Com 
mitlee members drafted an 
online textbook-listing pro- 
posal 

Senate members referred 
a resolution supporting the 
proposal back to the Uni- 
versity Relations Committee 
with a vote of 26 18-0 at the 
Feb. 22, 2007, Senate meet- 
ing 

At their March 1. 2007. 
meeting. University Rcla 
lions Committee members 
changed their original pro- 
posal to increase account 
ability for professors, in- 
crease the buy-back cycle 
ai Varney's and lower text 
book prices for students in 
the long run, according to a 
March 2, 2007. Collegian arti 
ele 

Student Senate members 
then passed the initial reso- 
lution in support of the on- 
line textbook listing at their 
March 8. 2007, meeting with 
a vole of 41-4-3. 

Wagner and Student 
Body Vice President Lyd- 
ia Peele included an online 
textbook listing in the aca- 
demic accountability plat- 
form of their campaign. 

"We fulfilled our prom- 
ise in that area," Wagner said. 
"We pushed the bookstore 
to post that information on- 
line, and I think that we ac- 
complished that goal. That 
doesn't mean we are going 
to give up on ihe textbook is- 
sue" 





TEXTBOOK S 



u'u-u'.rftr V-i""< 
■wmOffMHWMNN 

iJihs/iiUik.t'tmi 

(under the Marketplace application) 

wv.boektbttf.com 



StCVC U-vin, K- St.it e Stuilt ill I niim llonksiorc < manager, 
said buying textbooks ia generally an auction with no regula- 
tions 

"lis haaieally buyer beware." Levin said. "We had a stu- 
dent last Ml who bought $-100 worth ol book* anil thev gut 
a box of bricks. And there's no recourse. You're Hut k with 
what y»o have. There's iomt good deals, but you i uuld also 
lose a lot ot monev out there ' 




KXTBOOK RETURN POU 






-Keep your receipt. 

-Please bring back any dropper! or canceled 

spring 2008 textbooks by Feb. 6, 2008, to ensure 

a full ret mid. 

- Dropped" means customers can verify that they 

are no longer enrolled in the class. 

• "Canceled" means the course is Canceled or 

instructor cancels a specific book for a specif le 

class. 

-Valid bookstore cash register receipt is required, 

new books must be returned in new condition, 

and sets must be complete Internet access codes 

must be unopened. 

-Credit card purchases only can be credited back 

to the same card number ol purchase 

Source: Vomer's 



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PAGE 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2008 




Students urge others to 
look beyond bars for love 



| Joily n Brown | ( L l f G i At, 

The parking gauge, which is located south of the K State Student Union, is scheduled to be completed this December and will open in 
January 2009. 

Parking garage construction on schedule 



ByMkhlynnRcut 

MNStfSUtf COLLEGIAN 

The semblance of a parking 
garage is starting to lake form 
south of the K-State Student 
Union after several months of 
construction. 

"The garage construction is 
moving right along," said Gary 
Leitnaker, assistant vice presi- 
dent of human resources and 
parking. "You will see a differ- 
ence They are constructing col- 
umns th.it will support iha tirsi 
deck. Next month, the ground 
level concrete should be poured 
and it will start taking shape " 

As for the icy weather dur- 
ing finals week, Leitnaker said 
the contractors have built-in 



flaftin Extends 
Buyback Dales! 



Wore you left 
In the dark 

when it was time to 
sell your textbooks? 

Textbook 

Buyback 

In Progress 

at titafbnf 

Through January 3lsl 

ID 



weather days, and he said they 
are close to being on schedule. 
The garage should be complet- 
ed this December and open to 
drivers in January 2009 

Because of the loss of the 
parking spaces in front of the 
Union, four shuttles have been 
busing students to and from the 
Union and Peters Recreation 
Complex. The shuttles spend 10 
minutes at each location wait- 
ing on passengers before mak 
ing its commute. 

Hie shuttles were n-ry will 
received and utilized," Leitnaker 
said. "Seven hundred and fifty 
people a day have been riding 
the shuttles" 

These students ride the shut 



ties for classes, work ur visiting 
someone on campus. 

"1 ride the shuttle pretty 
much every day," Selh Gordon, 
senior in finance, said " If I have 
to go to school later or to the li 
brary 1 park on a side street " 

He said sometimes the shut- 
tle caused problems because he 
had an 8 05 a.m. class and the 
shuttle did not start until later in 
the day Krystin Matuszewtcz. 
sophomore in biology, said she 
shares the same frustration She 
was sometimes late to class be- 
cause of the inconsistency of 
when shuttles come and go. 
because of the traffic level on 
campus 

Matuszcwicz said she ndes 



the shuttle three days a week 
and finds ii convenient because 
she works in the Union. 

"Some shuttle drivers make 
conversation and make your 
day a little better," she said. 
"They interact with the students 
taking their minds off every- 
thing else" 

Leitnaker said anyone can 
ride the shuttles but to park on 
K-State property, a valid park- 
ing permit is required. Students 
can purchase a permit for the 
spring semester for $65 in Ed- 
wards Hall. A schedule of shut 
lie departure times is available 
on the K- St ate Parking Services 
Web site at wwwksuedu/park- 



By Mkhlynn Row 
MNMSSTAIECOUEOIAN 

Two partying singles make 
eye contact across the bar and 
find themselves wandering 
over to introduce themselves, 
immediately making a con- 
nection The following morn- 
ing they wake up with no 
clue as to who the oth/r one 
is, wondering what happened 
the night before 

There are alternatives to 
finding a date like this in Ag- 
gieville or at parties. 

When searching for that 
special someone worthy of a 
trip home to meet the parents, 
look in honor groups, clubs, 
work or church, said Erica 
Winter, K-State alumna and 
newlywed 

Erica said she met her hus- 
band, Zach Winter, K-State 
alumnus, in the honor group 
Phi Eta Sigma She said they 
first were introduced at the 
annual Up Til Dawn philan 
thropy event, but she didn't 
even remember his name 
However. Erica was invited to 
a barbecue at his house where 
they connected. They started 
out as friends attending Bible 
study and club events together 
and the rest, Erica said, is his- 
tory. 

Man a Mai, sophomore in 
elementary education, said 
students should look for a 
date in their major, classes, 
residence hall or job. Mai met 
her fiance, Bud Laude. senior 
in art education, while work- 
ing at Derby Dining Center 
and they now have been to- 
gether for seven months 

"Get to know them first 
before you jump into a rela- 
tionship," Mai said. "I think 
that helps." 

Where students look for 
a date also depends on what 
type of relationship they are 
interested in. Erica said 

"You shouldn't really look 
for a date; when you stop 
looking and have faith. God 
will bring someone into your 



life when you are ready," she 
said. "Bui if you just want 
someone to hang out with, 

it depends on what kind of 
person you are looking for If 
it is wild and crazy, go to the 
bars." 

[onathan Frazzell, senior in 
English, said he has met dates 
at the bars in Aggieville. 

"I don't always expect to 
find a girl - but it happens," 
he said 

Frazzell also said it is pos- 
sible to meet people at the 
bars to share long-term rela- 
tionships with. 

")ust about everybody goes 
to the bars, so you're going to 
meet any kind of person." 

Winter also said she dated 
someone she met at the bars 
in Aggieville They dated for a 
little more than a month, she 
said, and though they were 
physically attracted, they were 
not mentally compatible. 

Online dating is another 
way to meet partners outside 
of Aggieville, but Winter, Mai 
and Frazzell said they prefer 
alternative methods of finding 
relationships 

"I have friends who do on- 
line dating," Erica said. "They 
have found people, but none 
are married i think it's creepy, 
but it depends on your person- 
ality and if you believe in it." 

The important thing to re- 
member. Winter said, is that 
if students are unhappy and 
lonely with their lives, rela- 
tionships are not the best fix, 

"Remember girls: girl- 
friends always come before 
boys." she said 

Zach's advice to girls is not 
to smother their dales. Guys 
need time to spend with bud- 
dies and play video games 

Erica also said it is im- 
portant to keep in mind the 
image of what students want 
their match to be. 

"Just remember when you 
arc out looking for a date," she 
said, "Do what is in your per- 
sonality" 



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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 7 



Buddies program gives students chance to connect internationally 



By Katie Stance 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

There is a new way to 
get involved on campus that 
gives students the chance to 
learn a new language, expe- 
rience a foreign culture, open 
their minds to new ideas and 
make friends at the same 
lime 

K-Stale's International 
Buddies program pairs inter- 
national students with more 
traditional students The 
pairs meet once a week to eat 
lunch, go bowling, attend a 
spurting event or do whatev- 
er interests them. Though the 
main focus of the program is 



to have fun. there also is an 
educational purpose 

International students 
can increase their knowl 
edge of the English language 
by communicating regularly 
with their local buddy while 
domestic students can learn 
about life in a different cul- 
ture. 

The program began in fall 
2007 and membership is con- 
stantly increasing, said Claire 
Hemmendinger, senior in ho- 
tel and restaurant manage- 
ment and co leader of Inter 
national Buddies with Holly 
Campbell. 

I decided to lead the 
program because I saw the 



interest from domestic stu- 
dents to meet internation- 
al students, and 1 wanted to 
help the international stu- 
dents with their transition 
to Manhattan and K-State," 
Hemmendinger said. 

She said there are about 
J70 people enrolled at this 
time Those 370 people are 
not only students 

it's a community-wide 
program," Hemmendinger 
said "We even pair interna- 
tional students' spouses with 
people of the same age in the 
community" 

Internationa) Buddies is 
a free program; the only re- 
quirements are that members 



spend one hour per week 
with their buddy and com- 
mit to one semester of mem- 
bership. There is no age lim- 
it, and people can be paired 
even if they know only one 
language. 

fan Bayer, a student from 
Czech Republic majoring in 
mechanical engineering, said 
he joined Internationa] Bud- 
dies to get to know Ameri- 
cans, make friends and sim- 
ply for curiosity's sake Bayer 
said he has been in this kind 
of program before and find- 
ing activities both people en- 
joy can be tough, but he said 
he believes International 
Buddies is a great idea none- 



theless 

Adam Tank, a Kansas 
native and sophomore in mi- 
crobiology and pre med, said 
the decision to join was a no- 
bra iner. 

He said he thinks this is 
a good opportunity for stu- 
dents to expand their hori- 
zons 

"1 would like to hope- 
fully make a life-long friend, 
and I want to learn some of 
the culture so I don't em- 
barrass myself this summer," 
Tank said 

He is traveling to Mexi- 
co this summer, and said he 
would like to brush up on his 
Spanish 



During the sign-up pro- 
cess, students can indicate if 
they would like to be paired 
with someone who speaks a 
specific language, and wheth 
er they would Tike a male or 
female buddy People are 
matched based on their age, 
interests and preferences, 
said Hemmendinger. 

She said the pairing pro- 
cess could take as little « 
two days, depending on how 
many people arc waiting to 
be paired. People can sign up 
for more than one buddy. 

To sign up or to learn 
more about International 
Buddies, visit wwwk-slate 
cdu/oip/buddies/. 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 

785-532-6555 



II I I L | I I I I I I|||| l I I I i | 

L' i 1 " " ' L' :: L 1 «J ss "Ji- '* " 

LET'S RENT 




9j 

Kent-Apt. unfurnished 



LARGE. ONE BED- 

ROOM mil la campus 
Vary nice, recently up- 
dated with ample parking 
Mo pets. Available Immedi- 
ately 7*8-537-7050, 



RerH-Hama 



AVAILABLE JUNE: One 

three, tour, and live-bed- 
room houses Close to 
campus Reservn now tor 
best selection 785-539 
3672 Local landlord 



Rent-Houiei 



NEXT TO campus. Avail- 
able now. June and Au- 
gust One, two. three, 
lour, live, six and nine- 
bedrooms Apartments, 
houses and multiple >es 
No pets TSS-537-7050. 



5ulV Houses 



'HOUSES. CLOSE to 
campus, tor Bale, buy for 
less than renting Call to- 
day I 7fS-3t7-7T13 Cor- 
nerstone Realty 




V 

RentApi Unfumiihed Roommate Wanted 



He/p Wanted 



LEARN TO FLYi K -State 
Flying Club has live air- 
planes and lowest rates 
Call 785-776-1744 www.- 
ksu eduVVsIC 




FOUND A gold rmg by the 
International Student Can- 
ter on Tuesday. Dec 
I 11th Must Describe it 1 
Please small me at 
ler-WBSii'tLsu edu. 

WOMENS CLASS ring ir> 
Gated in AggieviHe New 
Years Eve Call to iden- 
tify 785-537-6843. 



0W LEASING 
FOR FALL 



Large 2 Bedroom Apis. 

Cambridge Square 

Sandstone 

Pebblebrook 



Mturaay 10-3 

537-9064 



2tMOC«*t«*.Ht»" 
• 1114 FfMnont* 



•51. 



OMat** 



WALE OR lemale to rent 
one or two-bedrooms in a 
nice tour-bedroom two 
bathroom apartment five 
minuia walk Irom campus 
on College Heights Rd $ 
290/ month all included. 
Available January IS 
Email h3007<tf'ksu edu 
78'i-3t 7-8291 
MALE ROOMMAlt 

wanted House three 
blocks from campus 
$325 00 plus one-tou* 0) 
utilities Call 620-228- 

1345 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
rour-oedroom, two bath 
apartment 1023 Col- 
orado All appliances fur- 
nished S275 plus utilities 
620-845-24S8 

THREE FEMALE interna- 
tional graduate students 
looking tor roommate at 
University Crossing www- 
ucmanhattan.oo™. Cad 
712-261-7877 or e-mail 
ruponwasaaiSgmall com 





Housing/ Real Estate 




MANHATTAN CITY Otdr- 
n arte a 48)4 assure* ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity In housing with- 
out distinction an ac- 
count of race, sen, famil- 
ial status, military sta- 
tus, disability, religion. 
age, color, national ori- 
gin or ancestry Vlota- 
. lion* should 



AVAILABLE NEXT school 
year Three to eight -bed- 
room houses All have fun 
kitchen washer' dryer, 
central air Call now for 
bast selection www lore- 
mostproperty com 795- 

539- *Mt. 

TWO. three tour. 
five, and six-bedroom 
apaflmenls and houses 
available tot June and Au- 
gust 785-539-8295 




JANUARY FREE' One- 
bedroom ol four-bedroom, 
two bath duplex available 
immediately until July 
$250/ month one-fourth 
utilities 10th and Valtier 
Clean, quiet, no pels 913- 

710-6662 

ONE ROOM In airirt*- 
bedroom apartment Avail- 
able February 1 Room- 
mates are great. Across 
from campus 1225 Ra- 
tone $265' month Call 
785-294-0567 

rime umi 



SUBLEASE 

May or August. 



rnof '-■ 



$315/ 
utilities 



ONE TWO. three, and 

four-bedroom houses 

Close to campus.' also 
ported to the Director of wM Avatabte , mme . Washer and dryer, close 
Human Resource* at diala(y N o pets 785-539- to Aggtoville Call 785-620- 
■Ctty Hall, 785-587-2440. , 975 „, 7g5 . 3 , 3.^95 0512 

H.I. ■ 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordl 
nance 4814 assure* ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity In housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count of race, set, famil- 
ial status, military tte- 
tu*. disability, religion. 
age, color, national ori- 
gin or ancestry Viola- 
tion* should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resource* at 
City Hall, 785-687 2440 

APPLY ONLINE' One lu 

tour-bedroom apartments, 

studios and lofts available 

January or August 2008 

Visit us al housing k -state 

edu or call 785-532-3790 

toset up a tour 

FOUH-rjE DROCiM 

^APARTMENT al 1S21 

-Leavenworth $900. bills 

"paid Call 785-539 8401 

OMF AND Iwo -bedroom 

apartments in new build 

-inns Close 10 campus 

;and Agflkivsta Available 

June and August 2008 

No pats. Can John at 785- 

313-7473 

ONc-BE&ROOM COZY 
apartment, one bloc* from 
campus $500/ month, in- 
cludes utilities Call 785- 
770-0491 

THREE BEDROOM 
APARIMLNT al 930 Os- 
age $750. bills paid. Call 
/8S 5398401 



FOUR-BED 
ROOM, updated brick 
ranch home. Nest to KSU 
Stadium. $137,000 Call 
785-539-6751 




AVAILABLE FEBRUARY 
t Four-bedroom. two 
bathroom. 1 300 square 
feel in RedBud Estates 
Neil to pool $800,' rnonih 
plus deposit 785 304 
0137 



SUBLEASER NEEDED 
lor a two-bedroom apart- 
ment wast ol campus 
Rani $337 50/ month plus 
utilities Please call 402 
617-5878. Room available 
immediately 

WANTED SOMEONE 10 
take over my lease One- 
bedroom $420. Park 
Place Apartments Neit to 
Pizza Hut Call Sua 785 
375-8011 




FOR SALE 1995 Liberty 
mobta horns 16x76, two- 
bedroom, two bath with 
shed. $15,000. 785-494- 
8484 Five miles east ol 
Manhaltan In nice parte 

WALNUT QROVE 2005 
Clayton Mobile Home 
Three -bedroom, two bath 
A* appliances shed, and 
deck 785-313-4560 





THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential ot advertise- 
ment* In the Employ- 
ment/ Career classifica- 
tion. Reader* are *d- 
vl*ed to approach any 
such business opportu- 
nity with reasonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian 
urges our readers to 
contact the Better 8u*i 
nest Bureau, S01 SE Jet- 
ter*on. Top***. KS 
86607-1190. 785-232- 

0454 



A WELL established, pro- 
fessional landscaping 
company is seeking a reli- 
able individual for full-time 
employment in their land- 
scape installation division. 
Pnor landscape or farm 
experience pralerrad 
Above average wages 
commensurate with expe- 
rience and ability Benefits 
include major medical, 
paid leave and 401 k Ap- 
ply in parson al 11524 
Landscape Ln.. St 
Qeorg*. KS 86535 785- 
494-2418 or 785-776- 
0397 

ACiButTfArrfJ tW: 

Due to our continued 
growth. ClvicPlus, the na- 
tion s leading provider of 
City. County, and School 
websites, has an opening 
for a full-time accountant 
This career position re- 
quires the ability to handle 
multiple tasks and prion 
ties white maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Accounting experi- 
ence is requited. 
Peachtree expenenca pre- 
ferred Competitive pay 
plus benefits including 
Health. Dental. Paid Hull- 
days, Paid Vacation and 
401K, Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or Text tor- 
mat to 
(obs®clvicplus.com 

ACCOUNTING CLERK 
part-time with USD 383 
Business Office $7.00 par 
hour Twenty hours par 
wwk during school year, 
full-time summer hours 
High school graduate or 
equivalent, computer 

skills including experience 
with Excel, working knowl- 
edge ol office procedure* 
and equipment baste ac- 
counting skills Job de- 
scription available Appli- 
cations accepted until po- 
sition I* filled Apply to 
Manhallan-Ogoen USD 
383, 2031 Poyntz Ave. 
Manhattan KS 86502. 
78S-587-20O0 Equal Op- 
portunity Employer 

APPOINTMENT SET- 

TER: ClvicPlus is the na- 
tions leading provider ol 
City. County and School 
websites We have lull 
and pan-time positions in 
Manhattan with significant 
income potential for the 
nght individual This posi- 
tion involves calling poten- 
tial clients to setup weba- 
nar appointments Pay n 
$10/ hour plus $40 for 
each webinar appoint- 
ment you setup. Full-time 
benefits include Health, 
Dental, Paid Holidays. 
Paid Vacation and 401K 
matching Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or Text 
format to 
|Obee)ctvicpius com 

ASSISTANT TENNIS 

COACH, Eisenhower Mid- 
dle School. Salary set by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spring stuff Accepting 
■ esumes or letters with 
qualifications until position 
is filled Apply to Manhat- 
lan-Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poynu Ave. Manhat- 
tan. KS 86502 785-587 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



BABYSITTERS NEEDED 
College S liter com con- 
nect* Kansas State stu- 
dent babysitters with Man- 
haltan area families Stu- 
dents, plea** visit Coftaga- 
Sitter com and creale 
your free profile 
BARTENDING' $300 A 
day potential. No expert- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 1-800-965- 
6520 eat 144 

SIllinE cooroinA- 

TOR: Due to our contin- 
ued growth. ClvicPlus. the 
nation s leading provider 
of City, County, and 
School websites, has an 
opening for a full-time 
Billing Coordinator This 
exciting opportunity re- 
quires the ability 10 handle 
multiple tasks and priori- 
ties while maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Competitive pay 
plus benefits including 
Health. Dental. Paid Holi- 
days. Paid Vacation and 
401 K Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or Tatd for- 
mal to 
tobaOcivlcpluB com 



FULL-TIME AND 
lime Porter needed 



HORTICULTURAL SER- 
VICES Garden Center is 
seeking reliable, moti- 
vated individuals tor lull- 
time and pan-time sea 
aortal positions in our re- 
tail store Above average 
wages commensurate 
with experience and abili- 
ties Apply in person al 
t1524 Landscape Ln, St 
George, KS 6653S 785- 
494-2418 or 786-778- 
0397 

HORTICULTURAL SFR 
VICES is seeking reliable, 
hardworking individuals 
t« full-time and part-lime 
seasonal staff in our pro- 
duction greenhouse Ap- 
ply m person at 11524 
Landscape Ln.. SI 
George. KS 66635 785- 
494-2418 or 785-778- 
0397 

IF^YOUiXiH ,i business 
major looking tor a great fi- 
nancial opportunity, try 
working lor the third 
fastest growing company 
in the nation. Wa will train 
you Call 785-342-2619 or 
email houseof|ob a *hot- 
mail.com for a business 
opportunity packet 

Musi LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 



part 



and Landscape Forman 
needed Competitive pay 
and benefits Please con- 
tact Alh an s Services In- 
c of Topeka KS 785-232- 
1558 01 www athansser- 



have valid driver's license 
and clean Driving record 
See Eddie al Schram 
Chrysler Dodge 3100 An- 
dorse n 

FULL-TIME CLERK pos, 
tons available Motorcy- ™n.am\. 
cling background a plus MECHANICALLY 
WW tram Apply in person 
at Brooks Yamaha. 8070 
East Highway 24, Manhat- 
tan. KS 

GRAPHIC DESIGN ' . 



IN- 
CLINED student to do 
apartmenl ana upkeep, 
beginning immediately 
Flexible hours. Variety ol 
work: carpentry, electrical, 
plumbing, painting, yard 
work, and general mainte- 
nance Send letter and re- 
sume c/o Sludenl Publica- 
tions, Box 300, Manhattan 
66506 



Plus a Manhaltan hintri 
company and the leader 
m government websites 
1* seeking lull time and 
con I racl graphic design 
ers No HTML experience 

bui must be MOUNTAIN DEW repre- cycle counting data Also 
tentative* needed. Be a support lor custom** s*r 



PROJECT MANAGER: 

ClvicPlus has an opening 
In our Manhattan head- 
quarters office tor a full- 
time Protect Manager 
This challenging position 
entails managing multiple 
website redesign project! 
Irom start to finish. Po*l- 
tion require* attention to 
detail, the ability to man- 
age multiple task*, priori- 
ties and dsadHnes, and a 
cheerful attitude. Training 
is provided Benefits in- 
clude Health. Dental. Paid 
Hobdays, Paid Vacation 
and 40 IK matching 
Email resume in text or 
Word formal to 
|obs (9 clvlcpius.com 
SERVICE COORDINA- 
TOR: Networks Plus ha* 
an opening in our Manhat- 
tan headquarters office for 
a full-time Service Coordi- 
nator This challenging po- 
sition entails taking cus- 
tomer calls coordinating 
protects, and scheduling 
technicians Position re- 
quires attention to detail, 
the ability to manage multi- 
ple tasks, pnorttlBS, dead- 
lines, and a cheerful atti- 
tude Training is provided 
Hours are 7:30a m to Sp- 
in., Monday through Fri- 
day Salary plus Fktalth. 
Denial. Paid Holidays. 
Paid Vacation, and 401 (k) 
matching E-mail resume 
in tail or Word formal to 
kibe •natwo nu spkji.com 

STEEL 8 PIPE Supply 
Company- Inventory Ana- 
lyst Assistant There Is an 
immediate opening lor an 
Inventory analyst assis- 
tant al our corporate of- 
fice. Position is responsi- 
ble lor creating migration 
materials, analyzing and 
monitoring SAP 
processes, and assisting 
analysis of warehouse 



STUDENT TECHNICIAN 
position opening $7 00/ 
hour. Hours requited: 
Twenty hours/ week when 
class Is In session forty 
hours/ week during sum- 
mer and breaks Job de- 
scription: Pickup and deliv- 
ery of computers, primers, 
etc. to various campus to- 
(vakd rjrtvan *- 
required) general 
PC and printer mainte- 
nance and tepait general 
inventory and accounting 
functions. Preferred qualifi- 
cations 1*1 or 2nd year 
student in computer, elec- 
tronics, or related major, 
applicants with demon- 
strated mechanical apti- 
tude, computer mainte- 
nance experience helpful. 
How 1o apply Interested 
applicants should come in 
person to 121 East Sta- 
dium to fill out an applica- 
tion Please contact An- 
thony Phillips al Antho- 
ny 9ksu.edu with any 
questions about the posi- 
tion 

wildca¥snee6j68S - 

COM PAID survey lakers 
needed In Manhattan. 
1 00S free to join Click on 
surveys 

If 



GROWING COMPANY 
seeking motivated K- 
Stater s who wish to earn 
money fast working pan 
time online horn home 
www I evidence abunzs.- 
00m 




Open Market 




COMPUTER. WINDOWS. 
Business, Internet and En- 
tertainment CO -ROMS tor 
Sale at Discounted 
Puces 1 Visit: wwwlas 
tandeasy com/walker 



WORK AT home, book 
keeping and sates repre- 
sentative You can work 
at home and earn up to 
$3000 $4000 monthly 
Contact if interested E 
mall: lgboclaro@nopl.net 





is 

proficient in Photoshop 
An understanding of 
Flash. Adobe Illustrator, 
end Microsoft Word is 
helpful but not required 
Musi be able to manage 
multiple projects simulta- 
neously in a last -paced repnellon.com/dewcrew 
environment Full-time to apply t 



leader this spring I Oat 
paid to promote a brand 
you love while gaining 
real world experience. 
Only two position* are 
available. Go to 



benefits include health 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 40f(k) 
matching Email resume 
and design samples 10 
tobs^ civicpkis com 
CHEAT JOB tor Out- 
doorsy Peopfet Kaw v.ii 
ley Greenhouses is look 
ing for help this growing 
season We are interested 
m part or hill- time sched 
ules tor the second 
semester For more Infor- 
mation contact human re- 
sources at kygemptoyrnen- 
t(#yahoocom or 776- 
8585 To apply in person 
go to 360 Zeandata Rd 
Manhattan, Monday- Fri- 
day 8a m 4pm 

HEAD TENNIS COACH. 
Eisenhower Middle 

School Salary set by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spring season. Accepting 
resumes or tetters with 
qualifications until position 
is Mtod Apply to Manhat- 
tan-Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poyntz Ave, Manhal- 
lan, KS 68502 785-587- 
20O0 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

KSU 



NOW HIRING Subway 
Work up to twenty hours a 
week, maals provided 
Day. night, and weekend 
shifts needed. Wilt work 
around schedule Pick up 
application at any Sub 
»tq including the Student 
Union 

PROGRAMMER Hf - 

SPONSIBLE lot develop- 
ment ol the websil* sys- 
tem for CivicPlus, Ihe na- 
tion's leading provider of 
local government web 
site*. This full time posi- 
tion tequire* ASP or ASP- 
NET experience, knowl 
edge of SOL. solid expen- 
ence with HTML, CSS 
and Javascript Fast 
paced environment that re- 
quires hard work and a 
smile Competitive pay 
plus full-time benefits in- 
cluding Paid Training, 
Health, Dental. Paid Holi- 
days. Paid Vacation and 
401 (k) malching Email re- 
sume 10: 
jobs v»civicplus com 



ADVERTISE HERE 



HELP WANTED 

BEEF CATTLE 
SEARCH CENTER 
CONTACT: Garrett al 
gparsonsi&ksu edu or 
785-539-4971 



vice and sales staff Quali- 
fied candidate* will have 
basic math and account- 
ing Work experience in in- 
ventory control a plus 
Two years college educa- 
tion pteferred Interested 
applicants should submit 
tosume to Sleet 8 Pipe 
Supply. Inv Analyst As- 
sist., PO Box 1666. Man- 
hattan. KS 88505 Equal 
Opportunity Employer 

STUDENT PUBLICA- 

TOMS Inc has » part- 
time position for a Macln- 
tosh technician available , 
The tech support 1**m 
maintains about 50 Macin- 
tosh workstations, provid- 
ing software support as 
welt as performing gen- 
eral hardware mainte- 
nance. Any experience 
with Mac OS*, design 
software such a* Adobe 
Photoshop. Adobe In De- 
sign, and networking is 
helpful but not required. 
Pay starts at $850 per 
hour with the opportunity 
to advance Musi be a lull- 
time student at KSU Ap- 
plications may be picked 
up in 113 Kedzle or online 
at http '/www kstetecoHs- 
gian com/sputt/ Down- 
load the second applica- 
tion at this link Applica- 
tion deadkne is 5 p m Fri- 
day. February 15. 2006 
Please include your 
spring 2006 class sched 



MOW HIRING - TWO LOCATIONS 



ABOVE AVERAGE COMPENSATION 

• Discounted Meals 

• Flexible Schedule 

• Crew Incentive Programs 

• Medical Insurance 

• Retirement Plan 



API'IA TODAY • WORK TODAY 



at: 

KWGoodftkid Place 

WOti Andetsiio Ave. 

EOE/Drug Free WirrhpUy 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



suldolku 



Fill in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every i x 3 box 

contains the digits I through 9 

with no repeats. 



RE 



ADVERTISE. 



weird roommate? 



find a new pad in the classifieds. 



Available Now! 



^| + 1 A bedrooms 

A. 



1 


4 


7 


3 






8 




9 
7 


8 


2 


7 

4 9 




1 


3 


6 


7 


5 


7 












3 


5 


6 


9 


4 




2 




8 5 




1 


3 




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2 


4 




5 




4 


6 3 


8 


9 




Sol 
at w 


utic 

WW. 


m and 
sudoku 


tips 

.CO! 


n 





FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share fiouse 
with female and mat* 
$300i rnonin. Utilities 
paid Call 7»5 S3T-4847 



IS SPOT LOST? 

Place an Ad 785-532-655S 



DIAMOND 



( live us a c.ill! 
337-7701 



-_ 



rm 1 prvKliant') Mini 

TiiLilK i iniMilriiti.il M-r i in 
s.nin il.it rvMilU* < ;ill for iipiminimt'iil 



s . 



Vtrilt tn l t .1 111 S iv 



PAGE I 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2008 




Campus groups help students find 
similar interests outside of classes 



PHOTOS COUBTtSY OF MKGAN LEONARD 

Above: M«gan Leonard and Christy Clartday weigh out ingredients to start making cookies Below: 
Megan Eplar and Kaliay Falrfiald are preparing cookies for the bake sale 



By Carly Harmon 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Joining a club on campus 
could be an easy solution for 
students tired of trying to so- 
cialize in classes or crowded 
bars 

K-Slate has 428 registered 
organizations covering a vari 
ety of interests. 

Whether you want to 
meet people who enjoy play- 
ing dodge ball or are inter- 
ested in finding friends with 
similar faith. K-State campus 
organizations exist to turn col 
lege into a memorable experi- 
ence 




For M egan Leonard, sen ior 
in bakery science and manage 
menl. joining the Bakery Sci- 
ence Club initially was a way 
to meet upperclassmen and be 
involved with something out- 
side of class pertaining to her 
major. 

She is now president of 
the BSC and will represent 
K-State at the American Soci- 
ety of Baker's Convention in 
Chicago 

"Being part of this club, 
I have gained a lot of expe- 
rience on equipment, more 
knowledge about baking and 
how to prioritize between club 
and homework." Leonard said. 
"I've been able to network 
with people that are in the in- 
dustry as well." 

She said she has made life- 
long friends through the BSC 
and also has enjoyed tasly ben 
ehts 

The BSC club meets every 
Tuesday nighl in Shellenberg- 
er Hall Baking Lab where they 
spend all night baking prod- 
ucts for the following week's 
bake sale which takes place on 
Wednesdays from 3-5 p.m 

Sean Jones, vice president 
of the Snow Ski and Snow- 
board club and senior in elec- 
tric engineering, said he alto 
liked the idea of joining an or- 
ganization when he first start- 
ed college. 

"At the time, I didn't know 
very many other people who 
had skied before, so 1 wanted 
to meet others similar to my- 
self," Jones said. 

Since his freshman year. 
Sean has traveled with the 
Snow Ski and Snowboard club 
to Breckenridge, Crested Butte, 
Aspen/Snowmass and Tellu 
ride, along with thousands of 
other college students from all 
over the country 



[ones said after each day 
on the slopes, club members 
spent the night relaxing in 
million-dollar condos — 

He also said the club tries 
to make it possible for small 
er trips by getting discount lid 
tickets. 

For those that think the 
club is for advanced skiers and 
boarders, that is definitely not 
the case, The majority of oui 
members are fairly new to skii 
ing and snowboarding and are 
interested in just having the 
opportunity to try something 
new." Jones said. 

If there still isn't a group 
that fits an interest or hobby, 
students can start their own, 
said Bill Harlan, assistant co- 
ordinator for student activities 
and services. 

He said registered organi- 
zations need at least five stu- 
dent members - with at least 
50 percent of total member- 
ship being students - a full 
lime faculty or staff person 
to serve as the advisor of the 
group, a completed registra 
lion form and a constitution 
for the organization. 

All groups must attend a 
registration meeting and have 
a one-on-one meeting with a 
staff member to finish the pro- 
MM 

It usually takes one week 
to get a club started, Harlan 
said. 

"1 think the best part 
about being involved in a club 
is making contact with other 
students and staff at K-State," 
Harlan said. "Your college ex- 
perience can be pretty imper- 
sonal if all you do is at- 
tend class Getting involved 
in organizations lets you have 
the chance to meet people 
outside of the classroom who 
have similar interests as you* 



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Short 



Student 
known 
for his 
resolve 



ByRyneWitt 
KANSAS STA If COUfcGtAN 

Lucas Short didn't have 
to come back to school af- 
ter being paralyzed from the 
chest down 
in 2006, but 
he was not 
one to give 
up 

So he 
returned to 
K-State dur- 
ing the fall 

2007 semes- 
ter. He was 
trying to 

iive a normal life again, but 
before the junior in electron- 
ic engineering could start this 

2008 spring semester, he died 
on }an, 10 from lung compli- 
cations, 

The 21 -year-old's chron- 
ic lung problems were from 
a diving accident at Tuttle 
Creek Lake that left him with 
the spinal-cord injury in Sep- 
tember 2006. 

Short skipped the 2006 
school year before coming 
back His return sent a mes- 
sage to people who knew 
him 

"His message was to nev- 
er give up," said Ruth Mill- 
er, his adviser and profes- 
sor within the Department of 
Electrical and Computer En- 
gineering. "He wasn't going 
to wait." 

Short was determined 
to accomplish his goals, 
said Brett Beier, Short's fel- 
low Phi Kappa Theta frater- 
nity member "He was one 
of the most determined in 
dividuals that I know" 

See SH0BI, Page 10 



Possible 

currency 

collection 

found 



By Owen Kennedy 
KANSAS SIATfc UlLLfcliiAN 

The Riley County Police 
Department discovered a large 
amount of collectible coins and 
paper currency (an. 4. which 
might have been stolen from a 
private collection. 

HCPD Capt Tim Hegarty 
said the currency was found in 
a building in central Manhat- 
tan but declined to comment 
on how much it was worth. He 
said he did not want to say what 
kinds of coins were in the col- 
lection, because if a person is 
missing such a collection, they 
already would know what is in 
it 

"They should be able to 
identify what was in and what 
the collection was comprised 
of," Hegarty said. "The contain- 
er it was in and the way it was 
stored leads us to believe it was 
someone's collection." 

Police do not know if the 
coins and paper currency were 
stolen from the location at 
which they were found, or if 
they were even stolen in Man- 
hattan, Hegarty said. 

There have been no bur- 
glary reports matching the prop- 
erty found earlier this year, and 
Hegarty said there were no ar 
rests in connection to the recov- 
ery 

"If it was a result of a bur- 
glary, we don't have any sus- 
pects," he said. 

Anyone with information 
regarding the recovered proper- 
ly should contact the RCPD at 
785 537 2112. 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2008 



Vol 113 | Mo 1 



After the storm 

City to clean up debris for next several weeks 



By Corene Br isertdins 
KANSAS STATE C01.lfl.IAN 

The city began the long 
process of cleaning up the 
debris from the recent ice 
storm that look out elec- 
tricity, downed trees and 
caused chaos during fall 
semester's finals week and 
winter break 

Jeff Walters, Pub- 
lic Works Superintendent, 
said all went well the first 
day of clean-up The city 
of Manhattan started pick- 
ing up limbs and brush on 
the northeast side of town 
They estimate the clean-up 
will take four to six weeks 
barring any further inter- 
ruptions by the weather. 

The only problem Wal- 
ters perceives is not gath- 
ering all the debris be 
cause people might not 
know when or where the 
city workers will be dur- 
ing the clean-up He said 
the residents need to make 
sure they stay abreast of the 
pickup The city Web site, 
www.ci.manhattan.ks.us, 
will have daily updates on 
where the crews will be and 
where they plan to be the 
following day. 

Residents and business- 
es unwilling to wait, or who 
missed the city pick up, can 
take limbs and brush to the 
Riley County Transfer Sta- 
tion located at 1881 Hen- 
ton Road The Transfer Sta- 
tion is open from 7 am to 5 
p in.. Monday through Sat- 
urday. Residents can depos- 
it brush and limbs free of 
charge, but businesses nor- 
mally pay $3 per ion. Gary 
Rosewicz, assistant coun- 
ty engineer, said the fee for 
businesses will be suspend- 
ed until Jan. 31 in support 
of the clean up. 

Rosewicz also said 
business has increased no- 
ticeably but not as much as 
they had anticipated. They 
receive between 100 to 200 
loads per day and expect 
that to remain the same 
through spring when peo- 
ple begin preparing for the 
growing season. 

Nick Arena, manage 
ment intern for city hall, is 
coordinating efforts 

S*e DEBRIS. ?tq* 10 







Photos by Jonathan Knight | UlLlJsGttN 

TOP: Jason Sagwr, right, and another city worker rake leave* into a Bobcat tractor Wednesday afternoon. Street crews have been 
workTng long days to remove the tree limbs that Manhattan residents have set aside. LEFT: A worker uses a Bobcat to place tree limbs 
in a truck Wednesday. Crews swept tree limbs into the Bobcat and use it to place them in the truck to be hauled away. Crews have 
worked since Monday to clear limbs, RIGHT: Tree limbs lay by the side of the mad while Dustta Potts waits to sweep more Lip. 



Hollywood actor's father a leading professor, researcher at K-State 



By Adrlanne DeWeese 

KANSASSTAIM Oil H.IAN 

A Google search of lames 
Marsden reveals an actor who 
appeared in recent movies 
like "Hairspray," "Enchanu-d 
and "27 Dresses." 

But add "Kansas State 
University" to the search and 
a biography of Regents Dis- 
tinguished Professor of ani- 
mal sciences comes up 

James Marsden, father of 
the actor, came to K Stale in 
December 1994 with 100 per 
cent research appointment 
The Regents professorship is 
the most prestigious of all ac- 
ademic appointments in the 
Kansas Regents' system of 
universities and colleges 

A MOVIE-STAR SON 

Marsden said he remem- 
bers the first time he knew 
his son would become a mov- 
ie star. At age 16, the future 
actor James Marsden and his 
family took a vacation to Ha 
wait. The boy introduced him- 
self to "Full House" cast mem 
bers, who were filming an ep 
isode of the TV show. 

"I went down to the pool 
one day to get him, and he 
was laying on a lounge chair, 
and he had his sunglasses and 
was twirling them," Mars- 
den said about his son "He 
had this total circle of young 
girls around him in his chair. 



just hanging on every wurd 
he had to say. I knew he had 
something then" 

Marsden said he enjoys 
attending his son's Hollywood 
movie premieres and has at- 
tended almost every premiere. 
He also said he is impressed 
al his son's versatility in act- 
ing roles. 

"His range surprises 
me sometimes, and I like to 
see that," Marsden said lis 
more fun to see him on the 
big screen than it is on the 
television just simply because 
it's a big screen - there he is " 



MEAT-SAFETY EXPERT 

Marsden, who special- 
izes in meal safety, came lo 
K-State for specific research 
with E. coli. He said he im- 
mediately got involved with 
research projects related to 
pasteurization technologies 
that would minimize the risk 
of the E. coli pathogen 

"We have developed so 
many technologies now thai 
are being used by the indus- 
try." he said. "Steam pasteur- 
ization of carcasses was vali- 
dated here at K-State. Steam 
cleaning carcasses with a lit- 
tle hand-held steam-cleaning 
device was developed here. 
Technologies that rely on ul- 
traviolet light for decontam- 
inating the surface of meal 
products - that was devel 




llsle Aldtrton | < oi l huiAN 
Dr. James Marsdan a distinguished professor of veterinary medicine, displays one of his rare books, 
"Sunrise Is Coming after While," a collection of poetry by Maya Angetou with illustrations by Phoebe 
Beasley on Wednesday evening. 



oped here A whole list of 
technologies were either de- 
veloped or validated here al 
the university over the past 1 5 
years" 

Before Marsden's K-State 
appointment in 1994, most 
food -safety research used sur- 
rogate organisms, he said. 

"The work wasn't real- 
ly done with the real patho- 



gens," Marsden said It was 
done with bacteria that aren't 
harmful bul behave similarly 
lo the pathogen We changed 
all of that here; we worked 
right from Ihe start" 

K-Slale researchers went 
into hiocontainment type 
laboratories and pilot plants 
where they inoculated meal 
wilh harmful bacteria The 



experiments and research in- 
creased the understanding of 
pathogens and iheir control, 
he said 

"Really, up until that 
point, most of the consumer 
groups who were very pow- 
erful in food safety were op- 
posed to most food -safety 

See MARSDEN. Page 10 




WOMEN ROCK BIG 12 

Catsimprovi lo ' Din conferonfe play 



PAGE 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2008 



* Call 



776-5577 




2008 SPRING EDITORS 



Puzzles I Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

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drama 
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lliruil 

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potentate 

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acronym 

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follower 

20 Grate 
22 Dated 
26 February 
archer 

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basket- 
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30 Grown-up 
elver 

31 UnyreW- 
tng 

32 Conclu- 
sion 

33 Back talk 

34 Billboards 

35 Time of 
your lite' 



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pionship 
prize 
money 

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40 Aclor 
Brad 

41 Deepest 
within the 

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bil 

49 Notion 

50 Boleyn 
or 
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51 Seek 
damages 

52 Kind 

53 Ad 

54 - 
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55 History 
chapters 



DOWN 

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compo- 
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units 

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solo 

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watch 

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box 

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THE MOl'NTAIN PEAK ON WHICH HIS \RK 
won in wij, HE CRIED 1 SMELL ARARAT! 

I mini, , r r\ pli VL|inp t'liu' II oUllills < ) 



Editors hope to expand coverage, listen to readers 



JON GARTEN j EDITOR IN CHIEF 
*(li»itudfntiji*wipiprrwirJijiiMietyo(l(-StW(()wa9f" 

SALENASTRATE | MANAGING EDITOR 
WILLOW WILLIAMSON | MANAGING EDITOR 
' 'Our qui r, to krep ttif (ollrgun sljff is motrvatKl as possfclr to 
proAi«qwlrryr>WTfrt(irsfw»d#>i*wouk)isolil«lfiryrjvide 
If*? pubiK with noting page rwu rontwl 

SHEILA ELLIS | CAMPUS EDITOR 
Auampus editor I *il strive to iwn ill *spttti of K StatfUanipus 
by praductng twwent That n, mforrrwcn*" 

OWEN KENNEDY | NEWS EDITOR 

K is my goal that we can make slonnttvK «r inportant rweiomlfy 

and ntwrvitioniKy speilfiully important to K Slit* ' 

KELSEYNOEL | OPINION EDITOR 

'My goat KM Mp produce 4 baiAfHfd and infomutivr ooimon page 

witti cokimni thit addms j biwd rin^e of topB 

JOEL /ELLISON | SPORTS EDITOR 
WENDY HAUN | SPORTS EDITOR 
"Our 90)1 Bto fairly and (omfwhemiwly icrvei all KStalt 
MNetks inrludrnq intrarmiraty into cotlequfe *fh»>lN% 
and dub sports' 

ALEX PEAK | EDGf EDITOR 

^rmWan and inform" 

BRANDON STEINERT | METRO EDITOR 
My goal ft to make sure students know wtial ft gomq on m 
the tommurWy around 1hem~ 



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HANNAH BLICK | COPYCHIEF 

SCOTT GIRARD | COPYCHIEF 

"Our goals are lo produie (Van art«l« *nd makf sure the store* and 

(olumm rrta»e to and intomi ilv K Staff (ommunrty ttpeaalfj thr 

students' 

ANNETTE LAWLESS | MULTIMEDIA EDITOR 



Jonathan Knight | i OUltitAK 

"TolaundraiwlingCotifq*H*bs(tFtwfunng audio, «dw and prtnt 
nmrttortwt 

NICOLE JOHNSTON | SPICIAl SECTIONS 

1 would liVe in inf iurte intormanw and fun tratute siwies m al I amoVs. 
I will hoot to helo bnies with ttai planrung in ire 0n» m a Ufdmw 
swtion 



THEBIOTTER I ARRESTS IN RILEY COUNTY 



The Collegian takes reports directly from 
the Rilev County Police Department. Wheel 
locki or minor traffic violations are not listed 
because of spate tonstiamts. 



MONDAY, JAN. 14 



Ashley Jo Ket, Ogden. Kan , at 94/ am for 
driving with a canceled or suspended license, 
Bond was $500 

Sharon Marl* Keeling, Topeka, at 1 2: 35 pm 
tor failme to appear Bond was 5500 
RoMlInd Kay Holloway 2}14Terry Way, at 
1.49 p.m (or failure to appear Bond was 54 78 
Richard Martin Glbion Green. Kan at 2:49 
pm for failure to appear Bondwas$j16, 
David R. Payne. }J10 Kennsington Court 
Apt J. at 10: tO p.m for battery Bond was 
5500 

Brandon Terrell Con 928 Mora St . at 11pm. 
far failure to appear Bond was St 70 
Charles Patrick Lyle. 1 1 JO Bertrand St.. Apt 

1 1 08 p.m tor driving under the influ 
era.e Bond was St. S00 

TUESDAY, JAN. 15 

Husam Ibrahim K. Alsayed. 1 1 1 5 N 1 2th St , 
6. at 1 55 am for driving under the influence 
Bond was S7S0. 
Scan Even PHelpi iOOO Turtle Creek Blvd.. 



S57. at 8:10 a m for theft and criminal use of a 
financial card. Bond was 51.000 
Jacob Peter Kati 400 Oakdale. at 1 2 53 p m 
for failure to appear unlawful possession of a 
depressant or narcotic and driving with a can 
celed or suspended license Bond was S7S0. 
Kryttal Lynn Urbarvek 210 5 Manhattan 
Ave „ at 1:02 p.m. for aiding and abetting and 
theft jond was S500. 
Joshua iliac Holla man 101 1 Fremont St . 
102, at 3:20 p.m for failure to appear. Bond 
was $S0O 

Nathan Ray Dodge 730 Allen Road, Lot 
1 79, at 6:1 5 p.m for driving with a canceled 
or suspended license and driving under the 
influence Bond was $1,500 
Annette Nlchole Garcia 3000 Tuttle Creek 
Blvd., Lot 79, at 9 pm tor possession of a con- 
trolled substance or narcotic, possession of an 
opiate or narcotic and unlawful possession of 
a depressant or narcotic Bond was $2,000 

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16 

Alberto Tom as Fellclano. 413 Redwood 
Place, at 1231 am for obstruction of the legal 
process, unlawful use of a license and driving 
without a drivers license Bond was $ 1 ,S00. 
Sandra Rom Henke, 1 1 16 Thurston St.. at 
2 10 am lot driving under the influence. 
Bond was S 7 SO. 



4* 



THURSDAY'S WEATHER 

PARTLY CLOUDY 
High | 30" Low | 19- 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The Collegian, a student newspaper at Kansas State University, n 
published by Student Publications Inc. it is published weekdays 
during the school year and on Wednesdays during the summer; ' 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS POSTMASTER: 
Send address rJMflgtStQttM i in nijtion desk at Kedzie 103. 
Manhattan, KS 66506-7167 First copy free, additional copies 25 
cents [USPS 291 020! Kansas State Collegian. 2007 



THE PLANNER 

CAMPUS BULLETIN BOARD 



Applications for Student 
Alumni Board art now 

available at the Alumni 
Center or online at www.k- 
S fdfe. com/5 fu dents 's t u 
cfentalumnibciofcf.cjspx. An 
information reception will 
be in the Alumni Center at 
4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 
S, for anyone interested in 
learning more about the 
group. Applications are 
due at the Alumni Center 
by 5 p.m no Thursday, 
Feb 7 

Relay for Life of Kansas 
Stat* University will have 
a team captains meeting 



at 7 p.m. Jan. 22, at the 
firehouse on the corner of 
Denison and Kimball av- 
enues Survivors are invited 
to come and be celebrated, 
and they are requested 
to arrive 45 minutes early - 
to receive free gifts and - 
snacks. Teams can sign upu 
at w w w. even tsc one ei.org/Z 
rflkstateks. 

To place an item in the 
Campus Bulletin, stop by 
Kedzie 1 16 and fill out a 
furm or e-mail the news J 
editor at cf>(/eg/on«i!spijf.i 
ksu.edu by 1 1 a.m. two days 
before it is to tun. 



CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS 

tf you see something that should be corrected, call news editor 
Owen Kennedy at 78S 532-6SS6 or e-mail co/Jeoidnjsspub ksu etfu. 



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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 3 



City funds additional 
downtown developments 



By Brandon Stein«rt 
M»SAiSt»HtOlL[6W» 

An ordinance to amend 
a Manhattan marketplace 
was approved by city com- 
missioners Tuesday night. 

The ordinance will al- 
low Dial Realty to devel 
op the area north of Osage 
Street, west of Tuttle Creek 
Boulevard, south of Moro 
Street and cast of North 
Fourth Street, according to 
the agenda. 

The ordinance passed 
3-2. Commissioners Bob 
Strawn and James Shcrow 
were opposed 

Commissioners also 
unanimously authorized an 
agreement with Dial Real- 



ly to build future residential 
units in the same area 

Twenty million dollars 
will be issued to Dial Realty 
in revenue bonds to acquire 
the land in the South Project 
area. 

Strawn said he was con 
cerned the city would not 
gain some of the franchises 
Dial Realty was promising 

Dial realty partner Rich 
ard Kiolbasa told commis- 
sioners that a Hilton Gar- 
den Inn would be one of the 
franchises constructed in the 
South Project area. Strawn 
used the inn as an example. 

"There's nothing in this 
agreement that says we're 
going to get a Hilton Gar 
den Inn." Strawn said 



Assistant City Manager 
Jason Hilgcrs said Dial Re 
alty has to own the project 
area before a specific fran- 
chise can be secured, which 
is why no franchise was 
guaranteed. 

He also told the com- 
missioners the agreement 
is very strict about building 
materials and the quality of 
the developments. 

After a lengthy period of 
questioning, the ordinance 
passed unanimously 

A real estate contract 
between the city and Dial 
Realty was approved unan 
imously to help Dial Real- 
ty purchase the remaining 
properties in the south rede- 
velopment area. 



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Sylvia Con boy 

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Large amount of tickets left 
for Will Ferrell performance 



By Adrianne DeWeete 
KANSAS StATElOLlKilAH 

Several hundred tickets 
remain for Will Ferrell 's Feb 
4 performance at K-State 

Ben 
Hopper, 
Union Pro 
gram Coun- 
cil program 
adviser, said 
available 
scats remain 
at Brain luge 
Coliseum in 
all three sec- 
tions - floor 

seats, the first 10 rows and 
bench seating 

"There are several really 
good seats available based on 
the tech writer." Hopper said 
"We had certain sections held 




ferrell 



not knowing where certain 
lech equipment would be So 
now that we have that infor- 
mation from the tour in a nag 
er, we have certain scats thai 
are really good seats" 

Student tickets are $10. 
$35 and $40. and public lick 
ets are $35, $50 and $55 
People can purchase up lo 
four tickets, but K Slate tbl 
dents must present a K- Slate 
ID at the performance. Hop 
per said 

Tickets can be purchased 
a I www.ksiaiesporia.com or 
bv calling Ihe K State Athlet- 
ics Ticket Office at 800 221 
CATS or 785-532 7606 be- 
tween 9am and 5 pm Mon- 
day through Friday. 

UPC members negotiated 
with Ferrell's agent for more 
than three months and sc 



cured a con I rat I in early De- 
cember for his performance. 

K State is Ferrell's first 
slop on his nationwide col- 
lege comedy lour thai pro- 
motes his film "Semi Pro." 
which has a Feb 29 theatri- 
cal release dale 

"Not only will this tour 
make people laugh, but it's 
going to change lives ... I 
think." Ferrell said in a Dec. 
6, 2007, Business Wire press 
release 

Ferrell's comedy lour also 
will feature comedians Zach 
Galifianakis, Demelri Ma run 
and Nick Swardson 

For more information 
about "Will Ferrell's Funny 
or Die Comedy Tour Present- 
ed by Semi- Pro" visit UPC's 
Web site at www.hsu edul 
upc 



Chinese ambassador to the United States 
to present first Landon Lecture of semester 



By Scott Girard 
KAHSASVtAlE COUEOIAN 

The Chinese Ambassa- 
dor to the United Stales mil 
speak at 230 pm Feb II 
in McCain 
Auditori- 
um as pari 
of K State's 
renowned 
Landon 
Lecture 
Scries 

H E 
Zhou Wen 
zhong,who 
has served 
as ambas 

sador to the U.S. since 2005, 
was scheduled to speak on 
Oct. 10, 2007, but was post- 
poned al the ambassador's re- 



Campus Phone Books 




We nz hong 



quest 

Charles Reagan, chair 
man of the Landon Lecture 
Series and associate to Presi- 
dent |on Wefald. said few lec- 
turers have rescheduled their 
lecture in the history of the 
series, so he does not expect 
the ambassador to reschedule 
a^ain 

Keagan also said the am 
bassador's lecture will be 
valuable to all student;. He 
said China is one of the last 
est growing nations in the 
world and has a significant 
effect on the United States 

"I don't know the con- 
tents of the speech, but it's im 
portant (or students to see the 
the lecture and ask questions 
first-hand." Reagan said 

Ambassador Zhou will 



be the third ambassador to 
the United States to speak 
in the sines since 2005 Sau- 
di Arabia ambassador Prince 
Turki al Faisal spoke Jan. 26, 
2007, and Japanese ambassa- 
dor Ryozo Kalo spoke Oct 
Id. 200"> 

"It's a sign of how inter- 
national the series is." Rea- 
gan said "We don't just look 
in the United Stales, we look 
alt over the world for political 
leaders' 

The lecture is free and 
open to the public Though 
there will be no seating ar- 
rangements for Ihe large 
number of Chinese students 
at K State, Reagan said the 
students will have a chance 
to meet the ambassador at a 
breakfast thai morning. 



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PAGE 4 



OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Asking for ID 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 20O8 




Requiring voters to show 
identification not a burden 



Christina Forsberg | « OU1GIAN 



In the first major cast be 
(ore the Supreme Court COS) 

cemtng voting since Bush v. 
Gore, Democrats and 
the American Civil l,ih 
ertics Union ure fighting 
tooth and nail against an 
Indiana law requiring vol 
crs to present a state or fed 
era) ID to cast (heir ballot 
Oral arguments (or this cast- 
began Ian 9. 
A posting on the Democrat 
ic Party Web site declared opposi 
tion to the law based on its ability 
to disenfranchise "real voters - se- 
niors, students, veterans, minorities 
and low-income families." 

Chairman of the Democrat a I 'arty, How 
ard Dean, was quoted in the posting as say- 
ing. "Undemocratic voter ID laws are just 
another part of a broad Republican effort to 
undermine our fundamental right to vote 
We will not let Republicans 
al another election " 
Always quick to 
shoot off his mouth 
without the facts, 
Dean should re -ex- 
amine the results 
from the 2006 Elec- 
tion in the slate of 
Indiana. While the 
law was in effect, ac 
cording to voting re- 
sults posted on CNN 
com. three incumbent 
Republicans lost their 
congressional seats 
which gave Democrats 
five of nine House seats 
If losing elections 
is considered stealing. Re- 
publicans need to take a few 
notes from late Mayor Rich- 
ard | Daley of Chicago on the 
proper way 

The Indiana law was de 
signed to prevent voter fraud during elections 
According lo Ihe Public Education Initiative 
concerning the new II) requirement, written 
by Indiana Secretary of State Todd Rokita. 
published Oct 13. 2005. the goal of this law 
was "to improve the integrity of Indiana elee 

In the time leading up to the May 2006 



Q 



<A» 



BRETT 
KING 



Primary Election, the slate was to make the 
public aware of the new law through "a com 
bination of mass marketing, direct marketing, 
in person training and strategic part- 
nerships" 

The state of Indiana's message was 
clear: "Go (to) the polls; bring pho 
to ID, vote with confidence" Some- 
how these simple instructions - which 
are in no way a burden to the Ameri- 
can voter, caused attorney Paul Smith 
- representing the challengers, to say 
during oral arguments as reported by 
USA Today on Jan «, "This is the most 
strict law in the country" 

As reported by USA Today. During 
oral arguments Indiana Solicitor Gen- 
eral Thomas Pisher said, "I think its also ter- 
ribly significant that we don't have anybody 
in front of this court ... who's injured by this 
law" 

The Indiana League of Woman Voters 
had one woman parading around for opposi- 
tion to the Indiana ID law, but according to 
the Fort Wayne Daily News, on Jan. 9. Faye 
Buis-Ewing was dropped by the 1LWV in their 
cause Ewing claimed to be a 50-year resident 
of Indiana, even though she and her husband 
spend winters at their own property in Flori- 
da. 

In the days before oral arguments, it 
was discovered Ewing had become a regis- 
tered voter in Florida on Sept 18, 2002. Daily 
News stated, Ewing "signed an oath that she 
was a Florida resident and understood that 
falsifying the voter application was a third-de- 
gree felony punishable by prison and a fine up 
to $5,000" 

Being registered to vote in Indiana and 
Florida makes Ewing a potential felon. 

A decision in this case will be rendered 
by the Supreme Court during the summer 
months, which will affect all citizens of the 
United States; however, let's be realistic. 

Citizens of this country are asked to pres- 
ent ID every day across the country. We are 
asked when we use a credit card, purchase al- 
cohol or tobacco, when pulled over by the po- 
lice or even applying for a job. Asking for an 
ID is not a burden Asking voters to pay a poll 
tax disenfranchises them - asking for an ID 
does not 



Brett King is a senior in political Hit nit. PI mm send com- 
ment* to opinion a ipub.kiti.tilv. 






THEF0URUM 

17851395 4444 

The Campus Fourum is the 

Collegian \ anonymous call-in 

system ihe Fourum is edited to 

eliminate vulgar, racist, obscene 

and libelous comments The 

comments are not the opinion 

o( the Collegian nor are they 

endorsed by the editorial start 

Dear f rink Martin, why the hell ire Sut 
Ion, Wilkei ind Beasiey on the bench with 
three minutes to qo in Ihe game? thinks 

Frank Martin, this is net in AM a«ne 
Please put your be sl players in it the end 
of the game 

frank Mamn, nice win 



Collegian 



lantltun §WM 

{DIIURINOIIil 
$»l«nt S1IMI | MNMMH 

• wuiiMnun | MtimiM, itmw 
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sn*«i( [tut I (iwus EOiirja 

Al*« Putt I IHf EDGE IWtDI 

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KtlMy NMl I OPINIO* EDHHW 

Windy Maun | SPOOtS tEMTon 

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Nkol* Muifton I SPKlM ttOtOm FDI1M 

Tyler MynoWi | AD MMMtt 



KANSAS STATE COLLECIAH 

nnwspufc km rdu 
IWne 10], Manhattan, KS 66506 

DISPLAY ADS (7SS) S32-6S60 

CLASSIFIED ADS (785) 5H-65S5 

MllVERt (785) SH-6SS5 

NEWSROOM (785)532-6556 

LETTEIS TO THt EDITOR 

The (olleqiin welcomes your letters to the 
editor They tin be submitted by r null 
to ttttmimptib.Hiitdu. or in person lo 
Kedne 1 16 Please include your full name, 
year in school ind major letters should be 
limited to 2 SO words All submitted letters 
might be edited foe length mil elicit y 



TO THE POINT 



Residents should help to clean up winter weather debris 



Manhattan is still digging 
itself out of the debris from 
the ice storm that almost par 
alyzed the city WIMWNTlia n 
late last year. 
When stu- 
dents returned 
to Manhat- 
tan from their 
holiday break, 
many limbs and pieces of de- 
bris were here to greet them, 

The city of Manhattan and 
the cleaning crews arc doing 



editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion 



everything they can to clean 
up the city, but they need the 
help of Manhattan residents 
and students 

If limbs are still in near- 
by yards, help out by mov 
ing the debris, to the curb so 
the crews do not have lo go 
into individual yards to gath 
er every limb If students have 
a fireplace, they should keep 
some of the larger limbs for 
firewood 

After the ice storm, the 



weather warmed up for a cou- 
ple days, but it looks like win- 
ter moved back to Manhat- 
tan along with everyone else 
As the weather worsens, the 
city's capabilities will slow, es- 
pecially with poor road condi- 
tions and low temperatures. 

Residents and students 
should let the season of giving 
extend to this month by vol- 
unteering to help out with the 
clean- up The crews do not 
have enough staff to clean up 



at the desired rate, and this 
will continue as the weather 
gets colder. 

These efforts will take time 
and will require help from all 
concerned Manhattan resi 
dents. The debris will not dis- 
appear on its own, and it is 
time to get Manhattan back 
to the way it was before the 
storm. 

Anyone interested in volun- 
teering should call the city at 
785-587-4588 



Senior student offers advice for successful college experience 



Here it is: my last first column of my 
last semester at K State Thousands have 
been in my place - like my mother and my 
aunts and uncles - and thousands will come 
after me - like my cousins and my brother 
But when a person is about to graduate, it 
is hard to trunk their experience is anything 
but their own Whal I have learned dur 
ing my seven semesters at K Stale will slay 
with me forever Some of the tilings I have 
learned 1 wanted to pass on to those who 
still have time lo spend here Hopefully you 
can leant from my experiences as you create 
your own. 

First, thou shall not buy books at Vamey's un- 
til shopping online first. Admittedly, Vamey's has 
stepped up to the plate and provided a book list for 
most classes on their Web site, but look around on 
Web sites like Amazon com and Half com before buy 
ing books al Vamey's 

You are now responsible for your own finances, 
and this means you must make the best choices with 
your money. From textbooks lo loan- < l>>n 

ger comes down to the allowance your mother gave 
you every week 

This brings me to my second tip: thou shall not 
go overboard on student loans, lust because loans are 
offered to you by the Office of Student Financial As 
sistance doesn't mean you have to take them Get a 
part-time job to pay for living expenses It's more im- 
portant to be better off than to "live the life" while in 
college. 

Third, being a poor college student is an ex- 
perience everyone needs to live through, bul being 
an overexposed college student isn'l something you 




KELSEY 
CHILDRESS 



should do thou shall not have discriminat- 
ing pictures of thyself on liicebookcom ;md 
the resi of the Interne! 

Tins means when you arc look- 
ing for your first full time job, employers 
could search on l-uchouk and Goagte.com 
to see whal you have been up to Sure, that 
turn you passed out on the bathroom floor 
in stilettos might be funny the next 
day, but il won't be funny lo some- 
OEM who is thinking about hiring 
you fur a job. Google yourself See 
what you can find, and do what is 
possible to make the best digital 
impression you on 

Memories and whal you do with your 
life make you into the person you are, which 
brings me to my fourth and final point thou 
shalt not forget about your childhood friends 
It is a fact of life thai people grow up and go 
their separate ways. However, the girl who 
sal by you the first day of third grade knows 
who you really are She was there when your 
parents got divorced and when your heart 
was broken for the first lime Being bound to 
get her by childhood makes some or the slroti 
gest friendships ever forged Keep in touch 
with the people who have kept you laughing 
your entire life That way, you will never forget 
the person you always were. 

There are so many cither stories I could tell arid 
' I could leach about my time spent at K State 
It might sound corny, but one of the most impor- 
tant parts of college thai shaped me into who I will 
he when 1 graduate was the ability to make my own 



mistakes So go, college student Go and make mis- 
lakes and create your own future 



Ms*y Childress h * senior in English literature aid creative writing. 
Mease send comments to opinion** ipub.k m.rdu. 




mam 



mtmm 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGES 



FROM THE EDITOR 



Campus coverage, 

multimedia to be top 

priorities for spring 




JONATHAN 
GARTEN 



At the beginning of my 
Collegian career, it didn't 
seem very likely that I'd wind 
up one day 
being the ed- 
itor-in-chief 

I didn't 
exactly shoot 
up the ranks 
of the Col 
legian staff 
right away 
Our staff had 
a surplus of 
sports writ- 
ers covering - 
most of the 

high profile sports - I was as- 
signed to cover women's ten- 
nis for two semesters. 

However, I didn't mind. I 
took the opportunity very se- 
riously. 1 went to practice ev- 
ery week, watched as many 
as 10 hours of K State worn 
en's tennis matches per week, 
and I even dressed up - if you 
consider wearing a polo shirt 
dressing up 

The point is, I took it 
seriously I might not have 
known much about women's 
tennis in the beginning, but t 
wanted to do everything pos- 
sible to absorb as much in- 
formation about the sport as 
f could because that was my 
job 1 did more than the bare 
minimum. I went the extra 
mile 

Now that f am the edi- 
tor-in-chief, I plan to do the 
same thing I realize the dif- 
ficulty of this job, but 1 know 
that working hard won't be a 
problem 

I have already filled posi 
lions with the paper as sports 
editor during spring 2007 



and managing editor during 
fall 2007 One thing I learned 
was that the Collegian has a 
way of sucking you in, and in 
some cases, taking over your 
life For my sanity's sake, I re 
aliie there will be times when 
I need to pull myself away 
from the Collegian to catch 
my breath and clear my head. 

If there are times that I 
need to take a break for a few 
hours, I feel confident that 
the staff I've assembled will 
be more than capable of run- 
ning the newsroom without 
me. One quality that I know 
they all possess is the ability 
to do a little extra when it's 
needed 

This semester, we plan to 
continue to provide students 
with as much K-State cover- 
age as possible If there's any- 
thing important happening 
on our campus, we want to be 
the first to cover it 

We would also like to 
continue improving our Web 
site and our multimedia cov- 
erage We hope to have more 
blogs, videos and breaking 
news to post on kstatecotte- 
gian.com 

However, we are always 
looking for suggestions from 
our readers Since we are 
the students' newspaper, we 
want to provide the best cov- 
erage for our students If you 
ever have a story idea, letter 
to the editor or just a random 
thought, come talk to my staff 
and me in Kedrie 116. 



ionithin Garten it t i*nwr in print 
journalism. Plus* lend commenti to 
nsw5iispub.kiu.«du. 



WORLD NEWS 



1 9 GAZANS, ECUADOR 
EAN KIBBUTZ VOLUNTEER 
KILLED IN ISRAELI-PALES- 
TINIAN CLASHES 

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip 
- Israeli troops killed a son of 
Gaza's most powerful leader 
along with 18 other Paleslin 
ians on Tuesday in the blood- 
iest day of fighting in the coast- 
al area since Hamas militants 
seized control last summer 

As fighting raged in Gaza, 
a Hamas sniper shot mid killed 
an Ecuadorean volunteer work- 
ing in the potato fields of an Is- 
raeli border fa mi Thai killing, 
and Tuesday's high death toll, 
stoked the flames of violence 
at a lime when Israel and Pal- 
estinian moderates are making 
hailing attempts to talk peace. 

Tuesday's bloodshed be- 
gan before dawn when Israeli 
infantry, tanks and helicopters 
pushed into northern Gaza in 
what the military said was a 
routine operation aimed at l';il 
estinian militants who launch 
rocket barrages at Israeli towns 
near Gaza almost every day. 

Three Palestinian civilians 
were killed in the ensuing fight- 
ing, along with 14 armed mil- 
itants - one of them Hussam 
Zahar, 24. the son of hard line 
Hamas leader Mahmoud Za- 
har. The Israeli soldiers pulled 
out Tuesday with no casual- 
ties. 




FORMER CONGRESSMAN 
CHARGED IN CONSPIRACY 
INVOLVING TERROR FUND- 
RAISING RING 

WASHINGTON - A for 
mer congressman and delegate 
to the United Nations was in 
dieted Wednesday on cfiarg 
es of working for an alleged 
terrorist fund raising ring that 
sent more than $130,000 to an 
al-Qaida supporter who has 
threatened U.S and interna 
tional troops in Afghanistan. 

Mark Deli Siljander. a 
Michigan Republican when he 
was in the House, was charged 
with money laundering, con- 
spiracy and obstructing justice 
for allegedly lying about being 
hired to lobby senators on be- 



half of an Islamic charity that 
authorities said was secretly 
sending funds to terrorists 

The 42 count indictment, 
unsealed in US District Court 
in KansasCity, Mo., accuses the 
Islamic American Relief Agen- 
cy of paying Siljander $50,000 
for the lobbying - money that 
turned out to be stolen from 
the U.S. Agency for Interim 
tional Development 

FEMALE SUICIDE BOMBER 
KILLS 9 SHIITE WORSHIP- 
PERS IN IRAQ'S DIYALA 
PROVINCE 

BAGHDAD - A female 
suicide bomber struck black 
clad worshippers preparing lor 

Shirk Islam's holiest day, kill- 



ing at least nine Wednesday in 
an attack that highlighted in 
surgents' widening array of tac- 
tics against a U.S. -led off en 
sive in key areas on Baghdad's 
doorstep 

A witness said people 
shouted slogans against al-Qal- 
da in Iraq as they carried the 
dead and wounded from the 
blast scene near a marketplace 
in Diyala province - a region 
of Farmland and palm groves 
northeast of Baghdad that 
holds strategic havens for ex- 
tremists. 

The blast in Khan Bam 
Saad, a Shiite village 15 miles 
northeast of Baghdad, was the 
fourth suicide attack by a worn 
an in Iraq in three months. All 
have taken place in Diyala. 




iiVfcSliilJM! 



we've got the stories you've got to read. 



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What do Hayden and McLovin' 
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They both registered to vote through: 



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in the Kansas primary : 

Democrats: Jan. 21 st 
Republicans: Jan. 25 th 

Easy online registration! 



WWW.DECLAREY0URSBF.COM 



PAGE 6 




JOEL 
1ELUSON 



K-State 

makes 

headlines 

over break 



Remember when Bob 
Huggins was (he head coach 
of the re- 
state men's 
basketball 
learn 7 

O K , 
maybe that's 
not the best 
way to start 
this column, 
but maybe 
it's worth 
pointing tnit 
that Hug- 
gins and h is- 
West Virgin- 
ia Mountaineers are neek-and- 
neck with K-State with a re- 
cord of 12-4 and are coming off 
their biggest home victory over 
Syracuse in 32 years 

Meanwhile, the Cats 
reached a similar height by 
shaking a five-game losing 
streak to Oklahoma K-State 
might not have Huggins any 
longer, but so far Michael Bea- 
sley has been a great consola- 
tion prize Frank Martin is hav- 
ing a good year, and it's K-State 
who generally is receiving the 
most national attention. 

The Beasley-lcd Wildcats 
have been making headlines 
throughout the winter break. 
From playing in the new Sprint 
Center to losing in a rout to 
Xavier. the stories continued 

Even while students were 
enjoying a long break, K State 
related sports stories kept pop- 
ping up all over as teams con- 
tinued their seasons. 

fust a few days ago, Bea- 
sley appeared on ESPN2 tak- 
ing part in a segment on the 
show "First Take" Even coun- 
try singer Toby Keith had to see 
Be as ley as he sat court -side last 
weekend in the Cats' win over 
Oklahoma 

The women's basket- 
ball team has been the talk 
of K-State sports recently af- 
ter knocking off two-straight 
ranked opponents during a 
road trip in Texas. 

The first win over Tex- 
as A&M ended the Aggies' 
26-home-game winning streak. 
The Aggies were ranked No. 12 
in the nation when the Wild- 
cats beat them. 

Next, K State knocked off 
No. 15 Texas in overtime. It 
was the first time the Cats de- 
feated back to-back ranked 
teams on the road since the 
1979 season 

The worst news for the K- 
Stale women came after after a 
Jan 2 win over Western Illinois 
when freshman forward Jackie 
Stanley announced she would 
be leaving the program because 
of differences with the coach- 
ing staff 

Both basketball teams are 
on pace to make a run at the 
NCAA postseason 

Basketball was not the 
only sport making the news 
during the break, as K-State 
alumnus Darren Sproles made 
headlines in leading the San 
Diego Chargers over the Indi- 
anapolis Colts and to the AFC 
Championship game. 

Sproles caught a screen 
pass and turned the play into a 
56-yard touchdown while La 
Dainian Tomlinson was on the 
sideline 

Keeping on the subject of 
football, K-State has a new of- 
fensive coordinator after |ames 
Franklin left for Maryland. 

Wide receivers coach Dave 
Brock will take over the pod 
tion after coaching Jordy Nel- 
son through an All- America 
season This year was Brock's 
first season at K-State after 
coaching at North Carolina. 

The track-and-field team 
also participated in three events 
during the break, including a 
trip to Arkansas for the Arkan- 
sas Invitational 

Highlighting that event 
was sophomore pole vault 
er Alexandra Gonzalez who 
became the third Wildcat to 
reach 13 feet jumping 13-02.25 
feet. Gonzalez came away with 
fifth in the competition 

With all the headlines K 
State made in the sports world 
throughout (he break, it should 
be a busy spring for Wildcat 
fans because the seasons have 
just begun 



)Mi J*lllton is t junior in *i*ctrwtk 
journalism, P(eai# lend commtnti to 
spartswsptifc.ksu.tdii. 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2008 



Racking up the wins 



Cats beat 

Tech, 

extend 

streak to 

six games 

By Joel Jeliison 
KANSAS STATfc COLLEGIAN 



K State let the three- pointers 
fly early and often against the Tex 
as Tech Red Raiders Wednesday 
night at Bramlage Coliseum 

It was the early points from 
those three-point baskets that 
helped the Wildcats extend their 
winning streak to six games with a 
71-45 victory 

K State opened the game with 
back-to-back threes from Kimber 
ly Dietz and Ashley Sweat to go 
ahead 6-4 with 17:28 left in the 
first half 

Dietz and Danielle Zanot 
ti knocked in consecutive three- 
point baskets with just over eight 
minutes to play in the hall to push 
the K-State lead to 25-11 The 
Wildcats finished the first half 
5-of-12 from the three point arc. 

Texas Tech responded with a 
7-2 lead late in the half, but then 
the Wildcats defense took over 
keeping the Red Raiders from 
scoring again in the 3:29 left 

An additional key for K State 
in the first half was offensive re- 
bounding where they grabbed sev- 
en boards Lehning led the way 
in the half with four offensive re- 
bounds, and K-State finished the 
game with 14. 

"1 think it was important for 
us in this game to assert that we 
were going to defend post play and 
rebound well," K-Stale coach Deb 
Patterson said. "I felt we held our 
own against a very talented often 
sive rebounding team." 

The Wildcats opened up their 
lead again in the second half with 
a 9-2 run spanning just under sev- 
en minutes of play that put them 




Jonathan Knight | I'OLLBilAN 
Sophomore ShalM Lchnlng started off the season with a dominating performance on the boards. Lehning pulled down 1 2 
rebounds to go along with seven points and nine assists to lead the Wildcats to a 71 -45 win over Texas Tech Wednesday. 



ahead 47-26. 

Dietz hit another three with 
6:17 left in the half to give K-State 
a 57 35 lead before Texas Tech 
scored five straight to cut the lead 
to 17 points. 



K State put the Red Raid- 
ers away with consecutive three- 
pointers from Kelsey Nelson and 
Kelsey Hill The Wildcats finished 
the game shooting 9-for-26 from 
behind the three-point tine. 



Sweat and Dietz led the way in 
the scoring category for K-State 
each finishing with 17 points. 



Sw WOMEN. PjgelC 



Men go 5-1 over break, win first Big 12 game against Oklahoma 



By Wendy Haurt 
KANSAS STATE COLUGIAN 

The men's basketball 
team flourished over the win 
ter break, posting a 5-1 re- 
cord and netting its first Bin 
12 Conference victory over 
Oklahoma on Jan. 12. 

FLORIDA A*M 

KANSAS CITY, Mo 
- All 11 players on the ac- 
live K-State roster scored in 
an 87-60 victory over Flori- 
da A&M at the Sprint Center 
on Dec. 17 

Though the victory 
looked solid for the Wildcat!, 
Coach Prank Martin said he 
thought the team came out 
and played lethargically 

"We're a better bas 
ketball team than Florida 
A&M," he said "We were 
bad in practice this week, 
and we played bad We could 
sit around and say ice storm, 
finals ... all those are excuses. 
I'm not interested in excus- 
es" 

WINSTON-SALEM 

Forty points Thai was 
Michael Beasley's contribu 
tion in a 90-48 victory over 
Winston Salem on Dec 22. 
Beasley almost outscored the 
other team by himself. 

He became only the 
ninth player in K-State histo- 
ry to score 40 and also post- 
ed his 1 1th double-double of 
the season 

"Mike's a tremendous 
talent," senior guard Clent 
Stewart said "He told me at 
halftimc that he was going to 
get 30 this half. I look at him 
and said, OK, you've gotten 
30 in a couple games but not 
in a half.' He said, 'I'm going 
to get 30 this half Watch' He 
went out there, and he was 
motivated " 



WAGNER 

K-State pul up scores in 
the triple digits Dec. 29 to 
push past Wagner 101-59 

Beasley, who had 21 
points and 10 rebounds, led 
the team in scoring Fresh- 
man guard Ron Anderson 
had a career-high in points, 
scoring 14 points and also 
pulling down six boards. In 
his first appearance in a Wild- 
cat uniform, freshman guard 
Dominique Sutton scored 10 
points and grabbed four re 
bounds. 

"Dominique (Sutton) 
is a good defensive player, 
and he is going to bring his 
A-game every time we prac- 
tice or out on the court He 
goes hard every game," Slew- 
art said. 

XAVIER 

K Stale's four-game win- 
ning streak was snapped Dec. 
31 by an upstarl Xavier team 
that is making a push for the 
NCAA Tournament 

Xavier had seven players 
in double figures, including 
Derrick Brown, who had 14 
points and 12 rebounds, and 
guard Drew Lavender, who 
had 21 points. Xavier won 
103 77. 

Shining for K-Stale was 
Bill Walker, who had a ca- 
reer-high 31 points and Fresh- 
man guard Fred Brown, who 
put up 25 points 

SAVANNAH STATE 

K State bounced back 
in a big way from the loss to 
Xavier, showing no mercy in 
an 85-25 rout against Savan- 
nah State Jan 7 

During the game, K- 
Slate set several records 
The 25 points scored by Sa 
vannah State was the lowesl 
ever scored in Bramlage Col- 
iseum Savannah State only 




K-State 
forward 
Bill Walk*r 

dunks over 
Oklahoma's 
Longar Longar 
in the first half 
of the game in 
Norman, Okla. 
The Wildcats 
won 84-82 to 
start Big 1 2 
play 1-0. 



scored four points in the sec- 
ond half, which was also a 
Bramlage record Savannah 
State also set the NCAA re 
cord for the lowest field-goal 
percentage in u half (they 
only shot 4 3 percent in the 
second half) 

OKLAHOMA 

NORMAN, Okla - A K- 
Stale team that played well 
beyond its years sealed a vie 
tory with less than three sec- 
onds left to stun Oklahoma 
on |an 12. 84 82 



Michael Beasley simply 
drove through the lane and 
put up a lay-up with 2.3 sec- 
onds left. 

After the game, Beasley 
said the play (hat came out 
was not the play originally 
set up 

"It didn't happen exactly 
like it was supposed to, but 
(freshman guard) Jacob Pol- 
len was able to play like a 
point guard and make a play, 
and it worked out for the 
best," he said "Jacob's ability 
to pull my man toward him 



Jonathan Knight 
COOKHAJi 



was just gorgeous It was the 
perfect play." 

K-State's record im- 
proved to 1 1 4 and 1 -0 in the 
Big 12 It was the first time 
K-State has won in Norman 
since Jan 20, 1996. 

K-State had a season- 
hinh field-goal percentage. 
shooting 56.4 percent from 
the floor. 

Michael Beasley had his 
sixth 30-point game, putting 
up 32 points The K-Slale 
player record for 30- point 
games in a season is seven. 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 






THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE? 



State lottery hires 

consultant to review 

casino contracts 



THE ASSOCIATED PRESSi 

TOPEKA - The Kansas 

Lottery Commission took an- 
other step Wednesday toward 
making resort casinos a reali- 
ty when it hired a consultant tu 
help write and negotiate con 
tracts with the 13 applicants to 
manage the four facilities 

The commission unani 
mously agreed to hire Richard 
Schuetz. of Laguna Beach, Ca 
lif ., and to pay him $40,000 for 
the first 90 days His fee could 
be up to $120,000 if he works 
an additional 60 days 

"We really don't have a 
background in casino -type gam- 
bling. To do it right, we want- 
ed to get a consultant on board 
with that background, and Mr 
Schuetz will Mil the bill," said 
Ed Van Petten, the Kansas Lot- 
tery's executive director 

Schuetz has three decades 
of experience in the gambling 
industry, including top posi 
turns at five casinos in Las Ve- 
gas and one in Minneapolis He 
has been a visiting professor at 
the University uf Nevada, Reno, 
and the University of Houston, 
and holds graduate degrees in 
economics and finance. 

"I have been around the 
business a lot and will be a 
good conduit with people who 
haven't had the experience. I 
think they just want some ex- 
perienced hands on their side," 
said Schuetz. who started out 
dealing blackjack in Reno while 
in college 

Van Petten said Schuetz 
will help the Kansas Lottery 
evaluate the contracts and help 
negotiate them He said that 
will include checking on the vi- 
ability of an applicant's business 
plan and finances and back- 
ground information on them 

The Lottery has until the 
end of March to complete ne- 
gotiations with the 13 appli- 
cants, although Gov. Kathleen 
Scbeli us could extend the dead- 
line. Van Petten said he thinks 
the negotiations can be com- 
pleted without asking for more 
time- 



It can reach agreements on 
as many contracts as it wants 
and forward them to the Lot- 
tery Gaming Facility Review 
Board, which makes the final 
selection of casino developers 
in each zone. 

Last year, Sebelius signed 
legislation allowing for a casino 
in Wyandotte, Cherokee, Sum 
ner and Ford counties, plus 
slots al the Woodlands in Kan 
viv City ,iin.l Camp town Grey 
hound Park in Frontenac The 
state already has four tribal ca- 
sinos in northeast Kansas. 

The local government 
where the casino would be lo- 
cated must give its approval be- 
fore a contract is signed with 
the state Five applicants are in 
the process of getting that local 
approval 

Van Petten said negotia- 
tions are continuing with the 
tracks Earlier this month, a 
contract dispute between his 
agency and Camptown halted 
renovations at the track. 

"We've got a dialogue go- 
ing, and we hope to finish up 
soon We're talking to every 
body." Van Petten said 

He said the tracks prob- 
ably will operate slots by this 
summer - 600 al Camptown 
and 800 at the Woodlands, al- 
though the Lottery could in- 
crease numbers. 

Eleven states have nontnh 
a I resort casinos, but Kansas 
would be the first to have state- 
owned and operated ones The 
Lottery would own the gam- 
bling and contract with opera- 
tors to run the facilities. 

Even as the Lottery moves 
toward, the issue of whether 
the expanded gambling law is 
constitutional remains uncer- 
tain. A lawsuit filed by the at 
lomcy general's office argues it 
isn't and the issue is in Shaw- 
nee County District Court. Ulti- 
injidy. it will be decided by the 
Kansas Supreme Court. 

Sebelius said the law is 
constitutional but asked for the 
legal challenge to get a defini- 
tive answer from the Supreme 
Court. 



Court case could alter Nev. primary outcome 



THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

LAS VEGAS - A last-minute federal 
court battle over caucus rules demonstrates 
jus) how important a tight three-way Dem- 
ocratic presidential contest in Nevada has 
become in the battle for momentum head- 
ed into Super Tuesday's votes. 

Hillary Rodham Clinton. Barack 
Obama and John Edwards are in a statis- 
tical dead heat in polling here before Sat 
urday's caucuses. Nevada's sizable blocs of 
Hispanic, union and urban voter^'.ould 
provide an indicator of where the race is 
headed on Feb. 5 when hundreds of dele 
gates will be awarded in stales with signifi- 
cant minority populations 

By contrast. Republican candidates 
have stayed away from the diverse elector 
ate and unfamiliar electoral landscape as 
Nevada voters weigh in earlier than ever 
before 

No major GOP candidate has set foot 
in the state for two months, and some Re 
publicans arc bracing for a possible sur- 
prise first-place showing by long-shot Tfex 
as Rep Ron Paul, the only Republican lo 
broadcast TV ads in Nevada 

At issue in a federal court hearing 
Thursday is whether Democratic caucus- 
es will be held in nine casinos along the 
Las Vegas Strip The special locations were 
designed to make it easier for housekeep- 
ers, waitresses and bellhops in the state's 
biggest industry to caucus at midday near 
their jobs rather than returning home to 
neighborhood precincts 

The rules were unanimously apprm >.d 
by the state Democratic party last March 
and ratified by the Democratic National 
Committee in August 

But last Friday, six Democrats 
and a teachers union, which has ties to 
the Clinton campaign, sued lo shut the 
sites on grounds they allocate too many 
deleptes to one group. Of roughly 10.000 
delegates to Nevada's presidential nomi- 



nating convention, more than 700 could 

be selected at casino caucuses, depending 
upon turnout, which could make them 
more valuable than some sparsely popu- 
lated Nevada counties, the lawsuit said 
Four plaintiffs are on the committee that 
approved the sites 

The DNC petitioned to join the suit 
on behalf of the state party Tuesday. 

The Clinton campaign has denied any 
involvement in the lawsuit, but Obama 
noted it was filed two days after he was 
endorsed by the powerful Culinary Work- 
ers Union Local 226. which has organized 
many workers along the Strip The union 
is the state's largest with 60,000 members, 
more than 40 percent Hispanic. 

The Illinois senator drew cheers at 
a Culinary Union event Sunday when he 
said the rules were fine until the union de 
cided, "I'm going to support the guy who's 
standing with the working people instead 
of the big shots." 

By Monday. Bill Clinton was defend 
ing the lawsuit. "1 think the rules oughl 
to be the same for everyhody," die former 
president told high school students near 
Las Vegas 

The Culinary Union circulated a 
less subtle message on fliers to members: 
"Backers of Hillary Clinton are suing in 
court lo lake away our right to vote in the 
caucus." It's airing the same message in 
Spanish lungaiige radio ads. 

The legal dustup is not the only sign 
that stakes have risen here as a new sur- 
vey this week by the Rent) Gazette- Jour- 
nal showed the race is a toss-up among the 
three main rivals 

Democratic campaign offices are 
packed with field workers from Iowa and 
New Hampshire An Obama phone bank 
has been expanded ■ into a trailer. New 
Clinton staffers are wearing name tags. 
The Edwards campaign tripled its staff 

Firs! to arrive after New Hampshire. 
Clinton went straight to a heavily Culinary 



Union neighborhood and found several 
members willing to break with the union 
to support her 

The fight over labor has dominated 
the campaign partly because its proven or- 
ganizing ability is one of the few tested ele- 
ments in the contest 

Party officials arc hoping 40,000 peo- 
ple turn out, 10 percent of the stale's regis- 
tered Democrats Four years ago. a record 
9.000 turned out. 

Clinton has the support of the Dem- 
ocratic establishment thanks to her state 
chairman. Clark County Commission 
Chairman Rory Rcid, Sen Harry Reid's 
son The New York senator lined up the 
boldface names in each demograph 
ic group, particularly among Hispanics, 
who are nearly 25 percent of the popula- 
tion She went after regular party activists. 
women and hordes of retirees with time lo 
work the phones 

Edwards locked down some early 
onion support, but the former North Car- 
olina senator wrestled hard and lost when 
he needed it most Along with the Culinary 
Union, the Nevada chapter of the Service 
Employees International Union aligned 
with Obama The Edwards campaign has 
focused on a badly needed win in South 
Carolina and did not rush to match the 
stepped -up Obama and Clinton efforts 

Before his labor endorsements. 
Obama's campaign was fueled by new vot- 
ers, blacks and scores uf out-of-state can- 
vassers from California and Arizona His 
workers reached out to the massive work 
I iree on the Las Vegas Strip in casino em- 
ployee breakrooms and cafeterias 

Obama has tripled his TV advertis- 
ing and added a new commercial about 
his union endorsements Clinton's ads 
have highlighted her promise lo clOM the 
proposed nuclear waste dump al Yucca 
Mountain, but all three candidates vied al 
a debate Tuesday to express the deepest 
opposition to the dump 




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Using the Aggieville 
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How do I use SafeRide if 
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t Call 539-0480 

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3. Wait at location for taxi 

4. Show a K-State Student 10 to the 
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A free service provided by the K State Student Governing Association 



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ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT j SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



THURSDAY, JANUARYI 7, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



A new you 

Campus offers resources for fulfilling resolutions 




Ptiotot by Joslyn Brown | (QllEGMN 
Discussing mathematics placement exams, Valentin* Burton, testing coordinator, speaks with international students with the translation assistance of Jimmy Wu 
graduate assistant lo K- State's English-language program. Placement exams are one of many services offered by the Academic Assistance Center in 101 Holton Hall. 



ByAdnanneDeWeese 
KANSAS 5 IMS COLLEGIAN 

Amanda Mosteller wants lo 
lead a "more fabulous life" in 2008 
through drinking more water, liv- 
ing a healthier lifestyle and becom- 
ing a posit ive change in the world. 

Mosteller, fifth-year student in 
history and women's studies, said 
most people word their New Year's 
rvsiilntions in a negative way. In- 
stead of focusing on mst losing 
weight, Mosteller said she wants to 
eat more fruits and vegetables and 
drink and smoke less this year. 

"If you put things in a negative 
way, you're less likely lo succeed," 
she said 

Mosteller wrote down her 
New Year's resolutions and has 
them on display where she can see 
them daily She said people should 
set resolutions lo improve them 
selves from the previous year. 

"You set little goals to set the 
big goals, which are resolutions," 
she said "It's one of those things 
where I want to be a better person 
than 1 was before, so 1 set resolu 
lions'' 

K Slate offers its students ser- 
vices in areas like wellness, financ- 
es, academics and counseling so 
they can work toward their resolu 
tions in January and year round 

WELLNESS 

Small goals - including daily 
and weekly goals - are necessary 
lo accomplish resolutions related 
lo exercise and wellness, said Erin 
Dawson, Peters Recreation Com- 
plex assistant director for fitness 

For example. Dawson said 
students should Ml in 10 minutes 
of physical activity each day with 
walking to class or working on an 
elliptical machine 

"Setting smaller goals will 
help people more in accomplish- 
ing those longer term goals," she 
said "If ii's something specific like 
a race, they may want to have the 
help of a personal trainer" 

The rec employs more than 20 
industry-certified personal tram 
M who can help students devel- 
op programs to achieve their well 
ness and exercise goals A quick 
start session costs $20 for students 
and consists of ;i first session with 
a fitness assessment and consulta- 
tion. The second session includes 
a one- hour workout Other pro- 
grams and their costs can be found 
at umm> recservices h state.edu/fil- 
ntmennces/fitpenotiattmin htm 

During the fitness assessment, 
trainers meet with clients and dis- 
cuss iheir specific goals, Daw- 
son said. Tlie rec also offers a free 
weighl-rotim orientation, where 
personal trainers introduce stu- 
dents to weight machines and car 
dio equipment 

"Even if they have a really tight 
budget, they could always do thai 
weight-room orientation, which is 
free," Dawson said. 

Many students and faculty 
members incorporate wellness and 
recreational activities inlo their res 



-. i lut mi is Dawson said. 

"There's always an overflow 
of people coming around at the be- 
ginning of the year" she said "We 
have had a lot of faculty and staff 
come in and sign up for payroll de- 
duction so that if they hadn't had a 
membership before, they could get 
one." 

FINANCE 

Saving money is as easy as one 
trip to the grocery store, said John 
Grable, associate professor of (am 
ily studies and human services and 
director of K-State's personal fi- 
nancial planning program. 

Students and faculty could 
save as much as $2O-$30 each 
month if they buy a 12-pack of pop 
or water from the grocery store in- 
stead of spending pocket cash at 
the vending machines, Grable said 

Another option for students to 
save money is starting a savings ac- 
count if they already do not have 
one, Grable said 

"If you're not saving money, 
pay more than the monthly mini- 
mum payment on a credit card," he 
said "|ust do something above and 
beyond the minimum You don't 
have to do dramatic things lo be- 
come financially fit; you just need 
to start with the small steps." 

Students should stay optimis- 
tic even if they break a financial 
resolution. Grable said 

"Try to save $1 today; at least 
give it an attempt." he said. "If 
you're at least trying lo save mon- 
ey, you're at least further ahead 
than someone who doesn't give it 
any thought." 

ACADEMICS 

Small adjustments like review- 
ing class notes every day and at- 
tending class can help students 
achieve their academic resolutions. 
said ludith Lynch, director of the 
Academic Assistance Center 

Instead of waiting until 
the nighl before an exam to be 
gin studying. Lynch said students 
should underline their notes or 
make flash cards within 24 hours 
of taking them in class 

"Many times students have 
bad habits, and if they just change 
those one or two habits to how 
they study, it can make a world of 
difference," Lynch said 'They have 
to make a conscious effort to rec- 
ognize those habits and make an 
effort to change them. It's just kind 
of a way of keeping that in front of 
them" 

Tutoring is the most underuti- 
lised service at K State's Acadcui 
ic Assistance Center, Lynch said 
More than 50 tutors are available 
in most subject areas, especially 
math and science, she said, 

"For any student who is wor 
ned about a particular class, we 
are able lo satisfy mosl requests, 
and you don't get one (tutor) un- 
less you ask," Lynch said "If ihey 
find out they don't need it. they 
can drop the tutor If ihey find out 
in the middle oi the semester they 
need one, it might be loo late" 




Spotting Pamela Fwrtro during one of her final exercises M«Hsm Haug wraps 
up the liourlong session. The personal training sessions usually include a variety 
of exercises that focus on strength training, cardiovascular activities and flexibility 
training. 

SUGGESTIONS FOR SIMPLE RESOLUTIONS 

Whenever possible, get an ettra how of sleep every nk»hf 

spend 10 minutes t wry ewnina flrafghtiiring up)W mm. 

Head il kivt one book per semester juvi for Am. 

If you drmt, consider setting i reasonable limit on how much you drink. 

Spend i little less time watching teley won. 

Spend i little let) time on MySpace or Facebook, 

Work in extra walking into your ,'veryriay rartini' 

(ill ywif more, more often. 

-Do your laundry Mare ft piles up on ihe flow 

Avoid drama as much a-, possible, an J I* kind to your friends, 

-Try to improve yo ur attention span in class, and attend daumottofow 
.'0 hours a semester at a total charily 

lit brMtt>it everyday. 

it ynu t nrNgtous, spend a little more time obserytna 

M youre seiually active , always urn protection. 

-Stop comparing yourself to other student* who you think an smarter or more am active. 

(ut your tun' spending by 2S percent 
-fltS it least three times a week, If not more 

Ut i ■ ,.. '■ i ...i.",ii,-', you ramfcn m& 

II -i bout the candidates and roe issues In the upcoming eh 

Source www cotkqfutHvtruty sure Whom 





COUNSELING 

Balance in one's life is an im- 
portant factor for selling reso 
lulions, said Dorinda Lambert, 
Counseling Services associate di 
rector and licensed psychologic 

"Most people who are mak- 
ing resolutions are looking back at 
what worked for I hem and want 
ing to make changes," Lambert 
said. "Students are wanting to look 
;ii bom they can handle relation 
ships, handle stress and procrasti- 
nating" 

University Counseling Servic 
es offers individual therapy scs 
sions for students. Enrolled stu- 
dents can receive four sessions 
each fiscal year at no charge Ses- 
sions five through 10 cost $14 per 
hour, and sessions beyond 10 cost 
$24 per hour For more in forma 
tion about University Counseling 
Services, visit wwui.k-state.edu/ 
OOtltmba§/ or call 785-532-6927 

Because each person is differ 



ent, Lambert said students have 
different factors and situations to 
consider when selling resolutions 

"They might look at how they 
might become more helpful in ur 
ganizing their lives," she said "For 
.some students, that might include 
finding balance in classes, cutting 
back on times in Aggjeville, cutting 
back on procrastination and cut- 
ting back on stress in their lives 

"Some students might look 
at how to become more clear on 
what they want in their lives. Oth- 
ers might look at how they might 
become more involved with Iheir 
liiinilies" 

When choosing resolutions, 
she said students must set realistic 
goals and not take on too much. 

"They need lo make sure they 
don't make such broad resolutions 
and need lo be realistic about the 
lime frame they have to make I hose 
changes and not make too many 
changes at one time," she said. 



PAGE 8 




ADAM 
REICHENBERGER 



ASK THE FIFTH YEAR 

Love the 
ones you 
are with 



Waiting in the hospital. 
Cake said it best: "The minutes 
change like seasons - only 
eight more 
hours to go." 

The 
clock on 
the wall 
stood sus- 
pended in 
time as we 
all hoped 
for the best 
but wait- 
ed for the 
worst Wait 
ed. Waited. 
Waited for the inevitable. 

With every second, a doz- 
en tears dropped, a hundred 
hearts broke, a thousand lives 
changed forever 

A week ago a friend of 
mine died, A friend who I had 
gone to school with for almost 
18 years, and before his acci- 
dent, we had played disc golf 
in the afternoons and enjoyed 
long conversations, which of- 
ten reverted to the naming of 
former high school classmates 
that we perceived to be going 
nowhere with their lives The 
list was long. 

A week ago a friend of 
mine died, and I remember 
feeling helpless that night and 
even more so during his visita- 
tion and funeral How do you 
comfort someone who has lost 
the perfect son? How do you 
console someone who has lost 
the most supportive brother, 
loving cousin, smartest tutor, 
funniest friend? He was some- 
thing different for us all, but of 
all the things he was, he was 
always the best 

A week ago a friend of 
mine died, and each day I re- 
gret not knowing him more. 
The man was a genius, plain 
and simple, and here I was the 
fool, loo scared to ask for help. 
The man was hilarious, sup- 
portive, kind, loving, and here 

I was, "too busy" to hang out. 

A week ago a friend of 
mine died, a friend who I was 
fortunate to spend Christmas 
with not so long ago 1 remem- 
ber hearing the laughter in his 
voice as he explained his new 
Wii, Turns out. if you give him 
a preseni and tell him not to 
open it, he would only listen 
to you so many times. He ru- 
ined the surprise by "acciden- 
tally" opening the very gifts 
he was told not to, which, of 
course, were the Wii games. 

II frustrated those who gave 
him the gifts, but he loved it 
just the same. He was excited 
about it, too, hoping it might 
aid in his rehabilitation. We 
were all hoping. 

We went to a movie that 
night - he, his family and me 
He wanted to see "I Am Leg- 
end." It scared the crap out of 
me, but he enjoyed il It seems 
all the things that frighten me 
in life he enjoyed. School, re- 
sponsibility, looming careers - 
they all terrify me But he had 
a grasp on things He under- 
stood the bigger picture and 
was able to take things slow 
ly and prevail through adver- 
sity He loved being tested and 
pushed to the limit of his abili- 
ties because to him there were 
no boundaries, nothing was 
impossible 

He loved lo learn, but 
more so. he loved to teach 
And therein lies my regret; I 
wish I had been a better stu- 
dent He knew so much it 
was scary sometimes Like his 
friend said at his visitation, 
"I guess the world just wasn't 
ready for stable fusion energy, 
'cause God knows, he would 
have figured it out" 

A week ago a friend of 
mine died, and now I'll nev- 
er have those opportunities 
to learn from his grace his 
brains, his love 

A week ago a friend of 
mine passed away, and while 
1 believe he's in a better place 
now, il still sucks He was a 
wonderful person, 

Co with love, Luke We'll 
always miss you. 



Warn Rekhenoerqer h. a fifth ynr 
student in mathematics and economics. 
Please vend comments UrDgt-ipub. 
Jiiu.edu, 



CLASSIFIEDS 



THURSDAY. JAMUARY 17, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



To place an advertisement call 

785-532-6555 

PAGE 9 



II II II 



II II 

L« «J s: 



1 1 ■ i it 



LET'S RENT 




LARGE ONE-BED- 

ROOM, next to campus 
Very nice recently up- 
dated wild smote parking 
No pels Available immedi- 
.ilely 7*5-537 -7050. 



Lost something! 

an ad FR Ef fof 

th 'eeday s i 



AVAILABLE JUNE: One. 
three, tour and five bed- 
room houses Close to 
campus Reserve now lot 
best selection 785-5J9- 
3672 Local landlord 



NEXT TO camput Avail 

able now. June and Au- 
gust One two. three, 
tour five an and nine- 
bedrooms Apartments 
nouses and multiplexes 
No pets 78S-537-7050 



'HOUSES, CLOSE 10 
campus tot tale buy lor 
less than renting Call to- 
day! 7»$-31 7-7713 Cor- 
nerstone Really 



Need A New 
Place to live? 

in the 

Classifieds 

for a 
roommate I 





MANHATTAN CITV Ordi- 
nance 4ft 14 aeaurea ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity In housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count of race, sen, famil- 
ial status, military sta- 
tus, disability, religion, 
age, color, national ori- 
gin or aneeetry. viola- 
tions should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resources at 
City Hall. 785-587-2440 



ONE. TWO. throe and 
tour bedroom houses 

Close lo campus' also 
wests*le Available imme- 
diately No pets 785-539 
1975 or 785-313 8296 

THR£E FOUR-BED 

ROOM updaled buck 
ranch home Neil lo KSU 
Stadium. % 137 .000 Call 
785-539-6751 






HOME CHILDCARE 

wanted tor 2. 5 and 7 year 
old Dnvabte and reliable 
car needed References 
required Contact Lindsay 
al 785-317-2140 or 
iknurae 79 gma il com for 
more mformalion 



AVAILABLE FEBRUARY 
t Four-bedroom, two 
bathroom. 1300 square 
feet in RedBud E slates 
Next lo pool S800 month 
plus deposit 785-304- 
0137 




Employment 'Careers 




MANHATTAN CITV Ordi- 
nance 4814 assure* ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity in housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count ot race, sex, famil- 
ial statue, military sta- 
tus, disability, religion, 
age, color, national ori- 
gin or ancestry. Viola- 
tions should be re- 
ported to the Director ot 
Human Resources al 
City Hall, 785-587-2440 

A^VtHYf3ce^or*e-bed> 
room Close to campus 
and Aggieville New paint. 
carpel and appliances 
Available now 1 No pets 
785-336-1124 

APPLY ONLINE' One 10 
lour-bedroom apartments, 
studios and lofts available 
January or August 2008 
Visii us al housing k-state 
edu or call 785-532-3790 
lo set up a lour 

FOUR BEDROOM 
APARTMENT al 1521 
Leavenworth $900. bills 
paid Call 785 539 8401 
HTTf"— TOITTwol553room 
apartments in new build 
ing* Close to campus 
and Aggieville Available 
June and August 2008 
No pats Call John at 785 
313-7473 

-,■■■■:.■■■ ■ 

aparlment. one block from 
campus 5500 month in 
eludes utilities Call 785 
770-0491 

THREE-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT at 930 Os 
age $750. bills paid CaU 
7 B5 539-8401 



FOR FALL 



Large 2 Bedroom Aois. 

Cambridge Square 

Sandstone 

Pnbulebrooh 



FOR SALE 1995 Liberty 
mobile home 16x76 two- 
bedroom, two baih win 
shed Si 5.000 785 494 
8484 Five miles easl of 
Manhattan in nice park 

PBnTA^^eaTtltunwo* 
bedroom one bath I4x 
65 mobile home, two car 
carpon. partially fur 
mshed. garden tub all ap- 
pliances large shed and 
deck Possible owner fi 
nancing. $10-500 Walnut 
Grove (785) 568-8483 
WALNUT ArOVE 2005 
Clayton Mobile Home 
Three-bedroom two balh 
All appliances, shed and 
deck 785-313-4560 




FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted to share house 
with lomale and male 
$300/ month Utilities 
paid Can 785 537-4947 

MALE ROOMMATE 

wanted House Ifiiee 
blocks from campus 
$325 00 plus one-lounh ot 
utilities Call 629-228- 
1345 

RooUmate 1 — 5eTlTE 

four bedroom two bath 
apartment 1023 Col- 
orado All appliances fur- 
nished $275 plus utilities 
620845-2498 

TTtRfTTPflATE-intemT 
tionsl graduate students 
looking lor roommate at 
University Crossing www- 
ucmanhallan com Call 
712-261 7877 or email 
ruppmelissa igrgmail com 





AVAILABLE NEXT school 
year Three lo eight -bed 
room houses All have ton 
kitchen washer/ dryer 
central air Call now lor 
best selection www tore 
mostpraperty.com 785- 
539 4641 



CKHUt 



'TUUHHbU- 



ROOM two bathroom car 
peted rec room. Near Ag- 
gieville/ campus central 
air. washer dryer, dis- 
posal, fireplace, garage 
Available now lease 
lerms negotiable (785)- 
317,5468 

ONE TWO. throe, tour 
live, and six -bedroom 
apartments and houses 
available tor June and Au- 
gust 785 539-8295 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 

wanted as soon as possi 
bte 1 One block from cam- 
pus 1 Vou will have your 
own bedroom and own full 
bathroom! With washer/ 
dryer, dishwasher, and 
lireplaco Wamr and trash 
paid tor 1 if interesled call 
Cami at 7B5 747 674;' or 
e mail me c2| Oksu edu 

SnTTciBm"" irTTrtvee" 
bedroom apartment Avail- 
able February 1 Room 
males are great Across 
from campus 1225 Ra 
lone $265- month Call 

SUBLEASE THROUGrH 
May or August $315/ 
month plus utilities 
Washer and dryer close 
lo Aggieville Call 785-820- 
0512 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
lor a two bedroom apart- 
ment wesl of campus 
Renl $337 50/ monlh plus 
utilities Please call 402. 
617-5678 Room available 
immediately 

WANTED ^MFoWf to 
lake over my lease One- 
bedroom $420 Park 
Place Apartments Next lo 
Pi/ra Hul Call Sue 785 
375-801 1 




THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential of advertise- 
ments In the Employ- 
ment/ Career classifica- 
tion Readers arc ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business opportu- 
nity with reasonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian 
urges our reader* lo 
contact the Belter Busi- 
ness Bureau, 501 SE Jet 
lerson, Topeka, KS 
66807-1 190 785-232- 

0454 

A well estaMahtd, pro- 
feasional landscaping 

company is seeking a re* 
able individual tor lull RfM 
emptoymenl in then tana- 
scape installation division 
Pnor landscape or farm 
experience preferred. 

Above average wages 
commensurate with expe- 
rience and ability Benefits 
include major medical 
paid leave and 401 k Ap- 
ply in person at 11524 
Landscape Ln.. 51. 
George KS 66535 785- 
494-2418 Of 785-776- 
0397 

ACCOUNTANT/ CFO: 

Due lo our continued 
growth. CrvtcPkjs the na 
Iton's leading provider of 
City. County and School 
websites, has an opening 
tor a full-time accounianl 
This career position re- 
quires the ability lo handle 
multiple tasks and priori 
ties while maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Accounting expen- 
ence is required, 

Peachtree experience pre- 
ferred Compel ilive pay 
plus benelits including 
Health Denial Paid He* 
days. Paid Vacation and 
401 K Email resume m Mi 
crosofl Word or Tbx! for- 
mal lo 
tobaOovtcplus com 

accTCnTing CLERK 

part -lime with USD 383 
Business Office S7 00 per 
hour Twenty hours per 
week during school year, 
tun time summer hour* 
High school graduate or 
equivalent computer 

skiUs including experience 
with Excel working knowl 
edge of otltce procedures 
and equipment, basic ac- 
counting skills Job de- 
scription available Appn 
calrcms accepted until po- 
silion ls filled Apply to 
Manhattan Ogden USD 
383. 2031 Poyntt Ave. 
Manhattan. KS 66502. 
785-587-2000 Equal Op- 
portunity Employer 

APPOINTMENT SET- 

TER CivicPius is Ihe na 
lions leading provider of 
City, County and School 
websites We have full 
and part-nn.e positions in 
Manhatlan wilh signidcanl 
income potential tor the 
flfltfl individual That posi- 
tion involves calling poten- 
tial clients lo selup webi- 
nar appointments Pay is 
$10/ hour plus $40 tor 
each webinar appoint 
menl you setup Full lime 
benefits include Health 
Denial, Paid Holidays. 
Paid Vacation and 40 1K 
matching Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or Text 
Irxm.il lo 
job* O civic piu s corn 




ASSISTANT TENNIS 

COACH, Eisenhower Mid- 
dle School Salary sel by 
teacher* salary schedule 
Spring season Accepting 
resumes or letters with 
qualifications until position 
is tilled Apply to Manhal- 
tan-Ogden USD 363 
2031 Poynii Ave Manhat- 
tan KS 66502 785-587- 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

BABV'sifTEfts NEEDEfS 
CollegeSitler com con- 
nects Kansas Stale stu- 
dent babysitters with Man- 
hattan area families Stu- 
dents, please visit College 
Sfttercom and create 
your free profile. 

BARfFNDING' £300 A 
day potential No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 1-800 965 
6520 ext 144 

Wim COORD^A- 

TOR: Due lo our connn- 
ued growlh. CivicPtus. the 
nations leading provider 
ot City County and 
School websites has an 
opening tor a full-time 
Billing Coordinalor This 
exciting opportunity re- 
quints the ability to handle 
multiple I asks and prion 
ties while maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Competitive pay 
plus benefits Including 
Health Dental. Paid Holi- 
days. Paid vacation and 
401 K EmaH resume in Mi 
crosofl Word or Texi tot- 
ma,! to 
jobsCclvicpfus com 




MERS wanted tor posi- 
tions in the Knowledge 
Discovery in Databases 
Research group al K- 
State Applicants should 
be responsible diligent 
and creative, and should 
be lamiliar with C» or 
Java or have Ihe ability lo 
learn Pay is oommensu 
rate with experience, all 
grades are encouraged to 
apply Call 785-341-1599 
or send resume lo bnsutf- 
os ksu edu 

FLU l TIME AND part- 

dm* Porter needed Must 
have valid drivers license 
and clean dnving lecoid 
See Eddie at Sen ram 
Chrysler Dodge 3100 An 
darson 

FULL tlME CLElV POSI- 
lions available Motorcy- 
cling background a plus 
Will Iram Apply in person 
at B looks Yamaha 8070 
East Highway 24 Manhat- 
tan KS 

GRAPHIC DESIGN Civic 
Plus, a Manhattan based 
company and the leader 
in government websites 
is seeking lull -time and 
contract graphic design 
ers No HTML experience 
is necessary but musl be 
proficient in Photoshop 
An understanding of 
Flash Adobe Illustrator 
and Microsoft Word is 
helpful but not required 
Must be able to manage 
multiple projects simulta 
neously in a last paced 
environment Full-time 

benefits include health 
denial paid holidays paid 
vacation and 401 (k) 
matching Email resume 
and design lamp*** lo 
lobsOcivicplus com 



GREAT JOB tor Out- 
doors y People I ft a* Val 
ley Greenhouses is look 
Ing tor help this growing 
season We are Interested 
In part or lull-lime sched- 
ules for the second 
semester For more infor- 
mation contact human re- 
sources at kvgemptoymen- 
1*)yahoooom or 776- 
8585 To apply in person 
go lo 360 2«*ndal* Rd 
Manhattan. Monday- Rt- 
day Sa m - 4pm 

Uead Tennis coach. 

Eisenhower Middle 

School Salary set by 
leathers salary schedule 
Spring season Accepnng 
resumes or letters with 
qualifications until position 
is lilled Apply to Marihat 
tanOgden USD 383. 
2031 Poynu Ave. Manhat 
ten. KS 66502 785-587- 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

HELP WANTED ~ 
BEEF CATTLE RE 
SEARCH CENTER 
CONTACT Garrett al 
gparsonsOksu edu or 
785-539-4971 

Hr^-TT^-- — — 

VICES Garden Center is 
seeking reliable moti- 
vated individuals lor lull- 
lime and part-time sea- 
sonal positions in our re- 
tail store Above average 
wages commensurate 
with experience and abili- 
ties Apply in person al 
1 1524 Landscape Ln . Si 
George KS 66535 785- 
494 2418 or 785-776- 

tttr 

UorTicUlTural Sep.. 

VICES is seeking reliable 
hardworking individuals 
for full-time and part-lime 
seasonal staff >n our pro- 
duel ion greenhouse Ap- 
ply in person al 11524 
Landscape Ln . SI 
George. KS 66535 785- 
4942418 Of 785-776- 
0397 

|F VOU are a business 
major looking tor a great fi- 
nancial opportunity, try 
working tor Ihe thud 
fastest growing company 
in the nation We will train 
you Call 785-342-2619 or 
email houseofjobtthot- 
maH com for a business 
opportunity packet 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 
and Landscape For man 
needed Compelitive pay 
and benefits. Please con- 
lad Al ban's Services In- 
c a" Topoka, KS 785-232- 
1558 or wwwathansser 
vces com 

MECHANICALLY IN 

CLINED student to do 
apartment and upkeep, 
beginning immediately 
Flexible hours Variety of 
work carpentry, etedncal, 
plumbing, painling. yard 
work, and general mainte- 
nance Send letter and re- 
sume c/o Student Publica 
lions. Box 30Q. Manhattan 
6650*3 

MOUNTAIN DEW repr* 
xe ma lives needed Be a 
leader this spring 1 Gel 
paid to promote a brand 
you love while gaining 
real world experience. 
Only two positions are 
available. Go to www - 
repnatlon.com/dewcrew 
to apply! 

NEED SOMEONE to help 
clean my house, Sixteen 
hours' week Call Rhonda 
at 785-537-7978 tor inter- 
view 

HcWTiRING Subway 
Work up lo twenty hours a 
week meals provided 
Day. night, and weekend 
shifts needed Will work 
around schedule Px:k up 
application at any Sub- 
way including the Student 

Union 

PRlWi MANAGER 
Civic Plus has an opening 
m our Manhattan head- 
quarters office tor a full 
lime Project Manager 
This challenging position 
enlails managing multiple 
website redesign piofecls 
Irom atari lo finish Posi- 
tion requires attention lo 
detail the ability to man 
age multiple I asks pnon- 
lies and deadhnes, and a 
cheerful attitude Training 
is provided Benefits in- 
clude Health Denial Paid 
Holidays. Paid Vacation 
and 401 K matching 
Email resume in text or 
Word format lo 
jobs «> civicptus com 



get a job 

*»k-»* ^t# 




NOW HIKING - TWO MX ATIONS 



\l I. SHIH.s. |i \VS. MCtN S&« KKKKNI1N 



ABOVE AVERAGE COMPENSATION 

• Discounted Meals 

• Flexible Schedule 

• Crew Incentive Programs 

• Medical Insurance 

• Retirement Plan 



APPLY TODAY • WORK TODAY 



100 Ooodfbod Hmc 

HKIli Anik'fMin Ave 
I i H I iriijj tree WurkpLny 



SERVICE COORDINA 
TOR: Networks Plus has 
an opening in our Manhat- 
tan headquarters office for 
a lull- time Service Coordi- 
nator This challenging po- 
sition enlails taking cus- 
tomer caHa cooidmaling 
protect*, and scheduling 
tectimcians Position re- 
quires attention to detail, 
the abihly to manage multi- 
ple teaks, pnorrties dead 
lines, and a cheerful atti- 
tude Training » provided. 
Hours are 7 30a m to rip 
m . Monday through Fri- 
day Salary plus Health, 
Denial. Paid Holidays 
Paid Vacation, and 401 (k) 
matching E-mail resume 
in texi ot Word formal to 
jObsffrvetwprksplus com 

STEEL ft PIPE Supply 
Company Inventory Ana- 
lyst Assiatani There ■ an 
immediate opening for an 
Inventory analyst assa 
tant at our corporate of. 
tics Position a responsi- 
ble tor creating migration 
materials analyzing and 
monitoring SAP software 
processes, and assisting 
in analysis of warehouse 
cycle counting data Also 
support tor customer ser- 
vice and sales staff Quali- 
fied candidates will have 
basic math and account, 
ing Work experience m in- 
ventory control a plus 
Two year* college educa 
lion preferred interesled 
applicants should submit 
resume lo Steel A Pip* 
Supply, Inv Analyst As- 
sisl PO Box 1688. Man 
rialtan KS 66505 Equal 
Opportunity Employe i 




STUDENT PUBLICA 

TIONS inc has s part 
11m* position tor a Macin 
tosh lechnlcian available 
The lech support learn 
msmiain* about 50 Mean 
losh workstations, provid- 
ing software support as 
well as performing gen- 
era I hardware mainte- 
nance Any experience 
with Mac OSX. design 
software such as Adobe 
Photoshop. Adobe InDe- 
aign, and networking is 
helpful but nol required 
Pay starts at $6 50 per 
hour with ihe opportunity 
lo advance Musi be a full- 
lime student at KSU Ap 
pkcations may be picked 
up in 113 Kedrie or online 
at http /%ww kstalscolle 
gian comsputy Down 
toad the second applica- 
tion at this knk Apples 
tun deadline is S p m Fri- 
day. February 15 2008 
Please include your 
spnng 2008 class ached 



STUDENT TECHNICIAN 
position opening $7 00/ 
hour Hours required 
Twenty hours, week when 
class is in session, forty 
hours/ week during sum- 
mer and break* Job de- 
scription Pickup and deliv- 
ery of computers, printer* 
etc to vanous campus lo- 
cations (valid drivers li- 
cense required!, general 
PC and printer mainte- 
nance and repair general 
inventory and accounling 
functions Preferred qualifi- 
cations tst or 2nd year 
student in computer, elec- 
tronics, or related major 
applicants with demon- 
slraled mechanical apti- 
lude. computer mamie 
nance experience helpful 
how to apply: Interested 
applicants should come in 
person to 121 Easl Sla 
dium to fill out an applica- 
tion Please contact An 
Ihony Phillips al Antho- 
nyOksu edu with any 
questions about the posi- 
tion 



WILDCATSNEEDJOBS 
COM PAID survey takers 
needed m Manhattan 
100% tree lo fom Click on 
surveys 



WORK AT home, book 
keeping and sales repre 
sentative Vou can work 
at home and earn up lo 
$3000- $4000 monlhly 
Contact it interested E 
mail IgboclaroVnopi nel 



Deadline* 



Classified ad> muvt be 
pieced by noon the day 
before you w*nt your *d 
to run. Clenitlvd dit|il*y 

ads must bp placed by 
4 p m two working days 

prior to the date you 

want your ad to run. 

CAU 785 532 6555 

f-melf 



GROWING COMPANY 
seeking motivated K- 
Slaler's who wish to earn 
money fast working part 
time online from home 
www lavldarica abunra 
com 




COMPUTER. WINDOWS, 
Business. Internet and En 
lerteinment CD-ROMS for 
Sate at Discounted 
Prices' Visit www las 
(andeasy com/walks r 



MCCULLOUGH DEVELOPMENT says 

Don't move! m 



&iif&ltttittr2i#frtt<tiiti ' 



'^"* i *##$iw^ 



Stay with McCuflough 

and save money, time and 
all the headaches of moving. 

mdiproperties.com 785.776.3804 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



su|do|ku 

Fill in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 







5 




2 8 










8 




6 


9 


7 




2 


... - l 




4 


5 


1 




4 




8 




2 3 

7 








3 






3 7 
9 5 
2 6 


8 
1 


9 


8 


5 








a 


Sol 
t w\ 


ut ion a 
ww.sud 


nd 
oku 


tips 
.cor 


n 





"Real Hope. Rfttl Help, Real Options 

FrtT piv|jniini'> testinn 

Totally 1 1 hi lii Icti l i.t I sci \ ice 

Same day results • ( all for apiKHiitmcnt 

Located across From I'lmpiix m XnikTMin Vill.ipe 
k Mon lii *) ;i.ni, -^ p.m. 




Classified Rates 



1 DAY 

20 wordi oi lest 

(12,75 

r*Oi word over 20 

10! per word 

7 DAYS 

20 w ordt or less 

$14 70 

each word over 20 

2S( per word 

1DAYS 

20 word) or lets 

$1740 

each word over 20 

30i per word 

4 DAYS 

20 words or lesi 

mis 

*ach word over 20 
15« per word 

5 DAYS 

20 worth or less 

$20 50 

each word over 20 

40c per word 

(consecutive day rate) 



To Place An Ad 



Go to Kedne 10) 
(across from the K Stale 

Student Union ) 

Office houri are Monday 

through Friday from 

8 em. to 5 p m 

or place an ad online at 

www Xslatecolleglan torn/ 

«nd click the yellow 

Submit ClMiified link 



How lb Pay 



All classifieds mutt be 
paid: in advance unless 

you have an account 

with Student 
Publications Inc. Cash, 

check. MaiterCerd or 
Visa are accepted. 

There il a S2S seiv>c* 
charge on all returned 
checks. We reserve the 

right to edit, reject or 
properly classify any ad 



Free Found Ads 



As a service to you, we 

run found ads for three 

days free of charge. 



Corrections 



If you finer) an error in 

your ad, pleat* call ut. 

We accept responiibility 

only for the first wrong 

insertion. 



Cancellations 



It you wi( your item 

before your dd h&\ 

expired, we w>H refund 

you for the rem ami ng 

days You must call us 

before r>oon the day 

before the ad iv ra be 

publiihed 



Headlines 



For an extra charge, 

*ve 14 put a headline 

above your ad to catch 

the reader'* attention 



Categories 




BuJetln Board 




Housing Real Estate 






Op*>n MatkPt 





MMi 



Ml 



.» 



PAGf. 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2008 



DEBRIS | City encourages residents 
to help in storm clean-up process 



Continued from ftqt 1 

to gather volunteers for the 
debris cleanup 

"I think it's going trcmert 
dous." Arena said. "1 think its 
great that the community is 
coming together and helping 
each other out " 

Arena said a few local 
businesses and organizations 
have donated lime and equip 
ment for the project, but more 
arc needed 

"We were wanting to in- 
clude the limb clean up us 
pari of 'A Day of Service' on 
Martin Luther King Jr. Day," 
said Kim Fraiser, coordinator 
for the Volunteer Program at 
K-State. 



Ken Johnson, Ki wan- 
ts Club member, has volun 
leered to find people with 
in the Kiwanis Club and oth- 
er clubs affiliated with them 
to help clean up limbs and 
branches for disabled citi 
zens. 

"I think it's worthwhile." 
Johnson said "The two peo 
pie who called me are really 
desperate One woman had 
a tree limb go through her 
roof" 

For people unable to 
clean up their downed tree 
limbs and brush. City Hall 
has a list of volunteers. Resi 
dents can call or stop by City 
Hall and pick up a copy The 
main thing for people to do. 



Arena said, is to be patient 

Along with the city, the 
county has started cleaning up 
along the county roads "Wu 
actually started last week," 
said Rod Meredith, assistant 
director of Public Works 

They have two crews pick 
ing up the downed branches 
and debris along the sides of 
all county maintained roads. 

Meredith said they have 
no structured program and 
are not promoting the pick 
up. But if rural residents leave 
any branches along the sides 
of the county road, they will 
be picked up 

Anyone willing to volun- 
teer should contact city hall 
at 785-587-4588 



SHORT | Professors, colleagues 
recall student's humor, intellect 



Continued from Page 1 

Short also impressed his 
professors before and after his 
accident. Miller characterized 
her former student as "quiet 
and sharp" 

"He was going to be the 
quintessential engineer," she 
said "He was the most self 
less student that I know of" 

Caterina Scoglio, associ- 
ate professor in electrical en 
gineering, said Short was do- 
ing well when he relumed to 
school after his accident de- 



spile all of the injuries 

Besides being an active 
student, Short was involved 
witb the Phi Kappa Thela fra 
ternily and was a member of 
Alpha Phi Omega, a service 
fraternity 

"He had a sense of humor 
- quiet, but when he spoke he 
made you laugh," said Beier, 
i a junior in business manage 
ment and business marketing 
Beier said Short was 
the scholarship chairman in 
Phi Kappa Thela, and il was 
something at which he ex- 



celled 

"He kept the guys going 
with the nose-to-grindstone 
way," Beier said. "He helped 
me, I was always able to go to 
him" 

Short was a native of Au- 
burn, Kan., and memorial ser 
vices in Topeka have already 
taken place A memorial ser- 
vice in Manhattan is being 
planned bul has yet to be an- 
nounced. 

Short is survived by his 
parents, Steven and Janice 
Short, and his sister, Melissa 



WOMEN | Cats continue strong 
Big 12 conference performance 



Continued front Pigr 6 

Texas Tech coach Kristy Cur- 
ry called Sweat the most im- 
proved player she has seen in 
the Big 12 this season. 

The Wildcats used their 
experience and teamwork to 
overwhelm an inexperienced 
Texas Tech team at times. K- 
State finished the game with 
18 assists and forced the Red 
Raiders to commit 20 turn- 
overs 

"I think it's just us playing 
well together - getting the stop 
we need and hitting (shots) 
when we need to." Dietz said. 
" I think we are just really play- 
ing the mental game right now 



of playing mentally tough and 
competing every day" 

Lehning finished the 
game wilh seven points, 12 re- 
bounds and nine assists and 
was a key to the production of 
the Wildcats offense wilh her 
ability to penetrate and find 
open players 

"As far as teams go in this 
league, there is (Baylor's An- 
gela) Tisdalc and Lehning; as 
they go, the team goes," Cur- 
ry said Lehning ran her team 
very well tonight" 

The win marked the first 
time K-State opened league 
play at 3 since the 2003 
04 season when they finished 
14-2 in the Big 12 K Slate is 



now 11-5 after starting the 
year off by going 5-5. 

'This is a team that con- 
sistently works hard to get bet- 
ter everyday and it really does 
come down to the basics of 
being resilient and consistent," 
Patterson said "We had some 
losses that were disappointing 
to us in the preseason, but this 
group was determined to learn 
and improve." 

The Wildcats continue 
their three game home stand 
Saturday against No. 25 Col- 
orado at 7 p.m. Il will be the 
third game against a nation 
ally ranked opponent K State 
has played in the last four 
contests 



MARSDEN | Research professor 
establishes own TV noteriety 



Campus Phone Books 

On sale in Kedzie 103 
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 



(ontinuMt from Past 1 

innovations because they 
didn't trust them," Marsdcn 
said. ■'They always thought the 
industry was trying lo do some- 
thing that wasn't in the inter- 
est of food safety When we 
started working with the real 
pathogen, they could really re- 
late to what we were doing 
They could understand what 
we were doing, they could sup- 
port it and things started hap- 
pening much faster" 

FAMOUS IN HIS OWN 
FIELD 

Marsden has appeared as 
a food-safety expert on nuiner 
ous daytime and evening net- 
work news shows. He also is a 
regular guest on "World Busi- 
ness Review," which Norman 
Schwarzkopf and Alexander 
Haig co- host 

"If there's an issue ill at in- 
volves food or water or is sci- 
entific in such a way that they 
don't necessarily understand it 
well, they bring me on to co- 
host it," Marsden said "So I 
ask the questions and co-hosl 
it with either Gen Haig or 
Gen. Schwarzkopf so that they 
don't have to carry all of the 
technical questions" 

Curtis Kastner, director of 



the Food Science Institute at 
K-State, said Marsden 's Amer- 
ican Meal Institute and in- 
dustrial background added a 
breadth of knowledge related 
to food safety at K-Stale 

"Once you gel the exper- 
tise and get the program start 
ed, that lives beyond just the 
time we*re here because you 
develop the reputation, you ed- 
ucate the students." said Kast- 
ner, who has directed the Food 
Science Institute since its start 
in 2001 "It has a life beyond 
just what we do while we're 
here." 

While Marsden has a full 
research appointment, he also 
advises and researches with 
graduate students Pamela 
Hatesohl. master's student in 
food science, said Marsden is 
well- respected in the animal 
sciences industry 

"The field is very inter- 
esting to me, and he's been 
very helpful." Hatesohl said. 
"Sometimes it's been a little 
harder because I have a family 
and go to school, but he's been 
very helpful with that With all 
of the students, he treats us as 
equals and doesn't talk down 
to us ever and tries to help all 
of us learn." 

RARE-BOOK COLLECTOR 



Marsden also has a rare 
books collection in the Rich- 
ard L.D and Marjorie ). Morse 
Department of Speciai Collec 
lions at Hale Library He said 
he started the collection in his 
early 20s. 

During his adult life, 
Marsden acquired the Limit- 
ed Editions Club, a collection 
of rare autographed and illus- 
trated books published since 
1929. Only several full collec- 
tions exist in the United Stales, 
which George Macy started in 
1929, Marsden said 

Marsden said Upton Sin- 
clair's "The Jungle" is his fa- 
vorite book in the Limited 
Editions Club collection He 
said he made his students read 
the book while he still taught 
because it relates to the meat 
industry. 

"When you read the 
book, 1 always wondered my- 
self - he was sort of a social- 
ist and an activist. Did he just 
make all thai up, or was it re- 
ally a reflection of the way 
things were''" Marsden said. 
"And late in life, he wrote a 
forward for a Limited Edi- 
tions Club book and he talk 
ed about the tact that he did 
work in those plants and he 
did observe those conditions 
in meat packing plants." 



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KANSAS STATE 



4 




www.ktattcolltgiarucim 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



Vol.11) I No 80 



Former 

student 

president 

dead 



By Stwila tllis 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Furmer K State Student 
Body President Kyle Barker 
was known as a people person 
by his peers 

Barker, 29, who was elected 
student body president in 2001, 
died at his home in Olathe, Kan. 
on Dec. 19, 2007 from compli- 
cations that resulted from a car 
accident a few years ago, Bran 
don Kauffnian, vice president in 
2001 said. 

Barker attended KState 
from 1997 to 2002, according 
lo the K- State Registrar's office, 
and majored in political sci- 
ence. 

"Kyle was very charismatic 
and a real people person," said 
Kauffman, who spoke at Bark- 
er's memorial services on Dec. 
28, 2007 

Barker's ability to win peo 
pie over helped him connect 
with students while campaign- 
ing for president, Kauffman 
said. 

When Barker was elected 
for student body president, he 
was new to the KState Student 
Governing Association. 

However, Gayle Spencer, 
assistant dean of student life 
and office of student activities 
and services said Barker "got 
right in there and did a good job 
during his term." 

Barker's student govern- 
ment administration initiated 
the SaieKide program, Spencer 
said He also was involved with 
moving the KState 91.9 radio 
station studio into KState Slu 
dent Union in Spring 2002, ac- 
cording to an article published 
in 2001 in K-State's Update 
Magazine, a magazine for the 
A Q Miller School of journal- 
ism and Mass Communication. 

"Everybody loved him, he 
had a great smile," Spencer said. 
"You felt like you knew him the 
minute you met him." 

Kauffman also said he re- 
membered Barker's dedication 
to K-State 

"Kyle loved the universi- 
ty and just had a deep admira- 
tion and respect for it," Kauff- 
man said "Manhattan was his 
favorite place lo be" 

Kauffman said a large part 
uf their platfonn focused on im- 
proving the overall quality of 
life of students at K Slate 

Barker was also a bartend- 
er at Pat's Blue Kib'n Barbecue, 
president of Phi Delta Theta 
fraternity and a member of Pub- 
lie Relations Student Society of 
America and the Political Sci- 
ence Club, according the mag- 
azine article. 

Barker is survived by his 
parents Gerald and Dcba Bark- 
er of Spring Hill, Kan , his sister 
Kendra Jenkins of Olathe, Kan., 
his brother Kelly Baker of Law- 
rence and bis grandmother Bet 
ty Wealhcrwax of Tiverton, R.l. 



Prison 

to add 

cell space 

By Brandon Steinert 

KANSAS MATfctOLLEOlAN 



The Riley County Jail ig- 
niting fast, and it has created 
a space problem for the Riley 
County Police Department 

The Riley County Board 
of County Commissioners met 
Thursday morning to review 
the current plan for a multi 
million dollar facility expan- 
sion to deal with the cramped 
jail. 

The project originally was 
expected to cost between $3.1 
million and $3 4 million early 

SMrKPDPapH 



Planning for diversity 




Photos by Man Castro | < 01 1 H.IAN 

Cotatta Hamilton (left), graduate in architecture, Jaramy Anttrola (back left), graduate in landscape architecture, Clara nc* Oxandina (back right], fifth year in 
lanscape architecture and David Hltdabrandt (right), graduate in Architecture, discuss plans for the Coretta Scott King Gardens to surround the bust of Martin 
Luther King Jr. that was built last year in front of Aheam Field Mouse. The group of students started designing the gardens in fall 2006. The project will have an 
architectural firm construct drawings from the students completed designs. These drawings will be used in the actual construction of the gardens. 

Gardens designed to honor Dr. King, Coretta Scott King 



By Sarah Burford 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

When Coretta Scott King 
died last year, she probably never 
imagined being commemorated 
alongside her husband, the Rev 
Dr Martin Luther King |r . in this 
way 

K State is planning to build 
a group of gardens in honor of 
Mrs King called the Coretta 
Scott King Gardens of Engage- 
ment, which will surround the 
bust of Dr King that was dedicat- 
ed in front of AJiearn Field HoiiM 
last year 

K State 's National Organi- 
zation of Minority Architecture 
Students (NOMAS) was commis- 
sioned by Myra Gordon, associ- 
ate provost for diversity and dual 
career development at KState, to 
design the gardens The students 
hope to break ground for the proj- 
ect during next year's Martin Lu- 
ther King Jr. Observance Week, 
Gordon said 

"This is one-of-a-kind," she 
said. "The bust, the gardens, the 
lac l thai it's on Martin Luther 
King Jr. Drive with him looking 
down it ... it is truly, truly, truly 



unique. No one has a garden ded- 
icated to Mrs King" 

Since Dr King's last univer- 
sity speech was made at Aheam 
Field House on Ian 19, 1968, be- 
fore he died in April of that year, 
the university wanted to dedicate 
that area of campus to him and 
his wife, Gordon said. 

"It's an opportunity to eel 
ebrate her as we celebrate Dr. 
King," she said "This is a unique 
opportunity to reunite this worn 
an with her husband Really, they 
were an indivisible pair during 
the civil rights movement 

David Hildebrandt, gradu- 
ate student in architecture, is the 
president of NOMAS and has 
played a leading role in designing 
the gardens with his fellow group 
members He said the gardens' 
design of three intersecting cir- 
cles reflects King's principles and 
teachings 

The bust of Dr. King will 
stand as an anchor point at the 
intersection of the circles, which 
will represent three of his core 
principles, Hildebrandt said. 

One will be a reflection eir 
cle with landscaping and vegeta- 
tion to provide a peaceful envi- 



ronment. Another circle will sym- 
bolize action commemorating the 
action people took during the civ- 
il rights era and to acknowledge 
donors' contributions to the gar- 
dens; a timeline of King's life and 
the civil rights era will be includ- 
ed on a wall in this circle. The 
third circle represents education 
and is designed as a gathering 
place for classes and other groups 
to meet. Hildebrandt said. 

"All of us have worked real- 
ly hard on this project, and we're 
very proud of it," Hildebrandt 
said 

Clarence Oxendine, fifth 
year student in landscape archi- 
tecture and member of NOMAS, 
said the group started designing 
the gardens in fall 2006 Soon. 
the university will have an ar- 
chitectural firm construct draw- 
ings from the students' complet- 
ed designs. These drawings will 
be used in the actual construction 
of the gardens 

"They take our design and 
make it a reality,'' Oxendine said. 

He said the design was a 
combination of several students' 
ideas 

Hildebrandt said Colette 



Hamilton, graduate student in 
architecture, contributed to the 
main design, and )eremy Antero- 
la, graduate student in landscape 
architecture, dealt with the tech- 
nical details and costs 

"We want people to see it 
from the public realm, so not only 
current students but prospective 
students could see it from 17th 
Street, from Boscu Plaza." Oxen 
dine said "We want to lei them 
know the significance of what 
came about in [Aheam)." 

To raise money for the gar- 
dens, K-State is hosting an event 
called "Bring Forty lo Celebrate 
Dr King" on Thursday, |an. 24 
from noon to 5 p. in outside the 
KSDB-FM 91 9 radio station in 
the K State Student Union. The 
Martin Luther King |r Planning 
Committee is encouraging each 
student organization (or any indi- 
viduals who want to participate) 
to donate at least $40 to the fund 
lo commemorate the 40th onm 
versary of King's visil to KState. 

"We want to make her [Dr 
Gordon], the university, and ev- 
eryone who will be affected by 
the project proud," Hildebrandt 
said 



Actor, rapper to speak as part of weeklong MLK celebration 



By Sarah Burford 
KANSAS STATS OlIl.HilAN 

Performer Ice T will 
speak at 7 30 on Monday 
night in Forum Hall as part 
of Martin Luther King. Jr.. 
Week activities from Sunday, 
|an 20, to Saturday, |au 26 

Brandon Clark, Mar 
tin Luther King |r Planning 
Committee member and co- 
ordinator for mullicullur 
a] programs for the K-Slale 
Alumni Association, said Ice- 
T's lecture should be interest- 
ing since he is not only a fa- 
mous actor on the show Law 
and Order: Special Victims 
Unit, but also a former gang 
member and an orphan. 

"He's part of Dr King's 
dream - he started off with 
nothing but is now willing to 
give back to the community," 
Clark said. 

Historically black fra- 
ternity Alpha Phi Alpha, of 
which Dr King was a mem- 
ber, will hold its annual can- 
dlelight vigil Monday eve- 
ning following the Ice-T lec- 
ture. 

Clark who is also the fra 
ternily's alpha adviser said 
the MLK committee is hop- 
ing a large amount of stu- 
dents will come to the vigil 
and lecture since there is no 
school on Monday 



Careem Gladney. senior 
in finance and president of 
Alpha Phi Alpha, said the 
vigil helps students remem- 
ber the past but also look to- 
ward I he future to increase 
equality and diversity. 

"It's important [to have 
the vigil) so students can 
look at the past and then 
move forward into the fu- 
ture," Gladney said 

Following the vigil, 
K Stale's leadership studies 
department will hold a hot 
chocolate social, Gladney 
said. 

This year is the 40th 
anniversary of King's vis- 
it here on Jan. 19, 1968 be- 
fore he was killed in April, 
Myra Gordon, associate pro 
vosl for diversity and dual 
career development, said. 
King spoke at many schools, 
she said, but K- State had the 
privilege of hearing his last 
university speech. 

"K Stale is extreme- 
ly lucky." Gordon said "We 
have benefited from the most 
evolved thinking of Dr King 
To me, that's the greatest 
honor" 

The university also will 
have a fundraising campaign 
called "Bring Forty to Cele 
brate Dr. King" on Thursday 
The Ml K Committee is en 
couraging every student or- 



ganization to donate at least 
$40 to the campaign. 

The money will help fund 
the Coretta Scott King Gar- 
dens of Engagement, which 
will be built within the next 
few years outside of Ahearn 
Field House and will sur 
round the bust of King that 
was dedicated last year 

"This year is really about 
celebrating those 40 years 
since his speech," Clark said 
"K-Slale should take pride in 
that and take part in at least 
one activity and remember 
the life and legacy that he 
lived" 

On Monday at 8 a.m.. 
community members, stu- 
dents and faculty will meet 
for a prayer breakfast at the 
Clarion Hotel 

Starting at 10 a.m. Mon- 
day, music, a job fair, vol 
unteer activities, and oth- 
er events will take place at 
Manhattan Town Center all 
day 

A film showing on 
Wednesday at 11 30 am in 
the Union's Grand Ballroom 
will be another event for stu- 
dents to mark on their calen 
dars. 

"February One: The Sto- 
ry of the Greensboro Four 
is a civil rights documenta- 
ry that tells the story of four 
college students who sat 




down at a lunch counter in 
North Carolina in 1960 and 
thereby became part of the 
civil rights movement. 

"The men |the Greens- 
boro four) talk about how 
they were thinking then ver- 
sus how (hey are thinking 
now," Gordon said "College 
students played a tremen- 
dous role in Ihe civil rights 
movement" 

Clark said the MLK Plan 



ning Committee has worked 
hard to provide events that 
will be inviting and intrigu 
ing for students 

"We do this knowing we 
have come a very long way 
from 40 years ago, but we still 
have a long way to go," Clark 
said "The very least you can 
do is come out and attend 
one of the many events This 
week is for you, the students. 
Learn something new" 



MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. WEEK TRACK TEAM BACK AT AHEARN 



ACTIVITIY SCHEDULE PAGE 14 



PAGE 6 





mam 



~M m 



PAG£2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



^ 776-5577®) 



BEST BETS 

Your social calendar for the weekend 



PUZZLES | EUGENE SHEFFER 



ACROSS 

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Paleozoc 

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DOWN 
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instance 

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max 

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Friday- 1 1M:1<!.7TO,940 
Satunlay 115, A 10 J 00. 9.40 
Sunday 1.1S.4.10. ?:00.0:40 

A comedy aboul three ordinary women who 
form an unhkety friendship and deride to do 
somethinq eittaordinaty — rob one of tf»» 
most set lire banh in the world 



CL0VERFIELD 

Fridays 20, 7:00, 7:10. 920. 

0-45, II SO 

Saturday: 1:00, 3:10. S:«, 7:00, 

7 JO, 9:2 J. 9:45 

Sunday 1-00. HO. S:20. 7 00. 

7:M,9:».9:4S 



Fi« your*: New folders throw 
then taenia going away parly 
ihe night I 'vat a monster the size 
of a sky* in per defends upon 
ihe uty Tol f from the point of 
new o( the-.r video camera, the 
film it a document of then al 
tempt to M yi« the most surreal 
horrifying ewnt ol their lives 



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it T v c N M w fill M IN w w i y l 

II I (if I M'S JIM Mf 1 9YMXW 

Ye<.Urrlut\ CryMoqeto: II \ CXRiPLE OH 
MKIAIUDKKIKS UN) III! k\OI I SUPPOSE 

\ \W I DIM, KICI IN Mil ill I K>1 LOW 

[bdtiy'ii Cryptoquip Que: \l equals I 



Men's basketball 
K State vs. Texas A&M 

1 p m Saturday 
Bramlage Coliseum 

Esm 



Don't miss the men play in their 
'.emndBiqUqame 



SPORTS 



Women's basketball 
K- State vs. Colorado 

7 p.m. Saturday 
Rramlaqe Coliseum 
FSN Midwest 



Saturday's game will be 
their Big 12 home debut 



NEXT WEEK 



Track and field 
Wildcat Invitational 

Men s events 4 pm Friday 
Women's esmrts-12:1Spm, 
Saturday 
Aheam held House 

This event will be the fourth meet of 
the season 



Martin Luther King 
Jr. observance 
week begins 

Jan. 20-26 

A celebration of the civil rights 
leader's legacy. See page 1 for 
more details or visit 
wwwt itate.edu/caltnda! 




The Collegian takes repor ts duectly 
from the Riley County Police Depart- 
ment'! daily logs 
The Collegian does not list wheel 
locks or minor traffic violations be 
cause of space constraints 

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16 

Julius Ervmg Russvll .'.M Allison 
Ave 17, at 10 5? am for driving with 
a canceled or suspended license 
Bond was S7SO 
Justin Thomas Wild I. 1CU0 Batons 



THE BLOTTER 

ARRESTS IN RILEY COUNTY 

St., at 4:12 p.m. for failure to jppedi 

Bond was S 1,000. 

Calais James Phelps. Sit Fremont 

St, at 7:25 p.m for failure to appear 

Bond was S19S 

Christopher Michael Karotyi I }] 

E Butterfield Road, at 1 020 p.m Am 

possession of an opiate oi narcotic .. 

and failure to provide drug tan stamp. 

Bond was $2,000 

THURSDAY, JAN. 17 
Sarah Christine Herald 1917 



Bluestem Terrace, at 1 2:07 am. for 

driving under the influence Bond 

was 51,500 

Kevin Lee Brunei Jr , 819 N Eighth 

St, at 1:32 a.m. for battery. Bond was 

S7SO 

J i me t Thome I Moore. 1 J l 2 Blue 

moot Ave.. iS, at hJSa.m. for battery 

Bond was 4750 

Joshui Coring Goodman Krinhop. 

2315 Candlewood Drive. Apt 7, at 

240 a.m. for failure to appear Bond 

was 52,000 



Applications for Student Alumni 
Board are now available at the Alum 
ni Center oi online at wwwi jlate.com' 
sf utfen ri ■ s tudentalum mboan) ospi . 
An infornunon reception will be held 
dt the Alumni Center at 4: 30 p.m. on 
Tuesday. Feb. 5. for anyone interested 
m finding out more about the group 
Applications are due at the Alumni 
Center by S p.m. on Thursday, Feb 7 

Relay for Life of Kansas Stat* 
University will have a team captains 



THE PLANNER 

CAMPUS BULLETIN BOARD 

meeting at 7 p m. on Jan. 22, at Ihe 
hrehouse on the corner of Oenison 
and Kimball. Survivors are invited to 
come and be celebrated, and they are 
requested to arrive 45 minutes early 
to receive free gifts and snacks. Teams 
can sign up at www.evenn.ccwcef.cvgv 
rttkstateks. 

The 5th annual Brett Cushenberry 
Memorial Bullridlng will be at 7pm 
Jan 26 in Weber Arena Admission 
is 5 10 for adults. 55 with a K State ID 



and for children 6 to 1 2, and free for 
l hi Irlien younger than 6, 

Students for Obama will have its first 
meeting of the semester at 5: JO p.m. 
today in Union 206. Staff from the slate 
campaign will be present to discuss 
opportunities to get involved 

To place an item in the Campus Bulletin stop 
by Ked.'ie 1 16 and fill out a form or e-mail the 
news editor at co/lrtjion.o ipuMsu etSu by 1 1 
am two days before it is to run. 



CORRECTIONS AND 

CLARIFICATIONS 

There was an error in Thursday's Col- 
legian James Mars den i a Regents 
Distinguished Professor iif animal 
sciences. The Collegian i egrets this 
mistake If you see some thing that 
should be corrected, cat 1 news editor 
OwenKennedyal7855l2 6S56or 
e mail col/ecjirtnirtspiJb, kMj.edu 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The Collegian, a student newspaper at 
Kansas State University, is published by 
Student Publications inc It is published 
weekdays during the school year and 
on Wednesdays during the summer 
Periodical postage is paici at Mannat 
un KSPOSTMASTFH:Seixf address 
changes to the circulation desk at 
Kedoe 103, Manhattan, Kb 66506-7167. 
First copy free, additional copies 
25cents [USPS 291 020] 

h*iwilitrCr4>er]tfi,nat 



SATURDAY'S WEATHER 

Partly cloudy 
High | 26° Low | 14° 



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This Call is a Good Call 



What is SateRide ? 

SafeRide is free service, by K-State 
in conjunction with a Taxi Service to 
provide students with a sate ride to 
their home from any location in the 
city limits of Manhattan 

How do I use SafeRide if 
I'm not in Aggievilie? 

1 Call 5390480 
2. Give your name, location 
and home address 

3 Wait at location for taxi 

4 Show a K-State Student ID to the 
taxi driver 



Using the Aggievilie 
Pick-Up Station 

• There is no need to call SafeRide 
if using the Aggievilie Station 

• The Pickup station is at Willie's 
Car Wash, 12th & Sluemont 



Every Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday 

11 :00 p.m. -3:00 a.m. 



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FRIDAY, JANUARY 18 f 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 3 



K-State recieves $2.5 million grant for soon-to-open biosecurity center 



By Annette lawless 
KAMASStMBCOUKIAK 

K Stale might be one step 
closer in becoming the home of 

I new federal biosecurity facili 

V 

This week, bioscience re 
searchers from across ihe slate 
met dt i be Statehouse in sup- 
port ol research initiatives at 
Kansas Bioscience Day. The 
iwu day event served as a step- 
ping stone fur a new $2 5 mil- 
lion research initiative for 
K Stale's Biosecurity Research 
Institute, according to the Kan 
sas Bioscience Authority 

According lo the KBA. il 
launched the campaign for the 
plan, which would strengthen 
the university's research capa- 
bilities in addressing threats to 
the nation's food supply. 

The $2 5 million plan - 
known as the Collaborative 
Bioscience Research Initiative 
- will allow researchers from 
the government, non-profit or 
sanitations and other univer- 
sities to conduct research and 
mllaburatc wilh K State, ac- 
cording to the KBA 



"We're issuing a call today 
for the nation's brightest re- 
searchers to partner with us lo 
protect public health and safe- 
guard the agriculture econo- 
my," said KBA lYesideni Tom 
Thornton in a KBA press re- 
lease "Our facilities are high 
ly specialized and world class, 
and our scientists are doing 
world -class research. Now is 
the lime for collaboration to 
take on this important national 
challenge 

This week, the KBA staned 
soliciting grant proposals from 
researchers who would like 
to join the collaborative pro) 
cct Thornton said the CBRI 
was established to support Id- 
ler institutional research aimed 
at developing disease counter- 
measures, providing advanced 
testing, threat evaluation ca- 
pabilities and strengthening in 
stitutional biosecurity capabili 
lies 

Strengthening the abilities 
of the BR I was needed, as it 
will formally begin full-fledged 
research this spring The solidi- 
ty of BRI research and this $2.5 
million project can breed bei 



ler biosecurity opportunities, 
like the opportunity for K-Slaic 
being selected as the home <<l 
a National Bio- and Agro- De- 
fense Facility Kansas House 
Speaker Melvin Neufeld, R- 
Ingalls, said he anticipates the 
c ol I abora ti ve researc h proj 
ect should help Kansas attract 
NBAF 

"Initiatives like this high- 
light our commitment to win 
(NBAF) on the merits," Neufeld 
states in a media release. "Our 
slate already has established it 
self as a world leader in animal 
and plant biosciences The Col 
laburaiive Biosecurity Research 
Initiative and the NBAF com 
piemen t and expand the work 
of the Biosecurity Research In- 
stitute, a stale of the art facili- 
ty at K Slate, as well as Ihe nu 
merous plant and animal com- 
panies already in our slate The 
NBAF would be a greal fit in 
Kansas" 

Yet, even more important- 
ly. K State President )un We 
fald said lite plan would help 
put K-State on the map 

"This would set the stage 
for basic research, applied re- 



search, Ihe commercialization 
of that research, new startup 
companies, new jobs The ben 
efils lo Kansas would be, well. 
monumental," Wefald said. 

Competing against four fi 
inbti for Ihe biosecurity facili- 
ty, Wefald said he remains pos 
itive about what the universi- 
ty has to offer but also realiz- 
es I lie area might not meet big- 
city demands. If chosen as the 
NBAF site. Manhattan might 
have to accommodate lo those 
needs 

"Our setback' We don't 
have an international airport 
in Manhattan, Kansas," Wefald 
said. "You know, I think the 
other sites are a lit lie bit close 
to a - you might say - a na- 
iiona], an international airport, 
so we're working with the City 
of Manhattan 

"So if we do get il. there 
would be a proposal to kick in 
to have better air service So 
we're even going to try lo get a 
win on that one too" 

Wefald said he remains 
optimistic about Ihe possibil- 
ity of K Slate becoming a key 
player in security research 




nut PHOTO 
K- State's Biosecurity Research Institute is one of foui finalists for a S450 
million federal biosecurity facility. 



"We've got the undivided 
support from the speaker o{ the 
house, the president of the Sen 
ale, the governor, the state leg- 
islature, the congressional del- 
egation - clearly its Ihe No 
1 priority of the State of Kan 
sas," Wefald said "Then look at 
it: we're geographically in the 
middle of America we're in 
the middle of agriculture. Stra- 
tegically, geographically, scien 
title ally. I think we have a shot 
at this" 



That shot however like 
ly it might be - is against four 
other finalists for the $450 mil 
lion federal biosecurity facil 
ity The finalists include sites 
in Georgia. Mississippi, North 
Carolina and Texas. The De 
partment ol Homeland Secu- 
rity will make ils final decision 
in October, and construction 
would be complete in 2013 

A v*rciwi ot Ihu sto ry w<i mm i<j m .a I > 
written fwKTIUTV 49 ABC Newt 




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kslatecollegian.com 



|[HKELIGION 




^Directory 



College Avenue 
United Methodist Church 



HonJm. Wnrdiip 10:50 i.m 
Quidv$cftool4:l> i.m. 

I tilted Mcihodtit Cimpiu Miniitry 
fruit Strvitr ":J0 p.m. 
C ollrjt Mtal h:-o p m. 

hator lam lr> 
UXN Ulkp Wur US 4111 



unity 

i h ur« h of Minhillin 

AgnjwingsfiiTtualajninunity 

Service 11:00 A.M. Sundays 
Uplifting menage & mutic 
ECM Center 1021 Oenison 

unity, m#i}mi,i1 torn VO &1J0 

WwM.unity.0r9 1 800 NOWPHAY 



Unitarian- , 
Universalis! 
Fellowship 
of Manhattan 

4HI A'jiitialL" knj*l (SVhcrt iciMim tinil 

Litnituori fiikk am h ■ 
PrnfTvn S«*U> at HM9 Ui N«l<j:irti* 

cdlk .tlHMl 1 lil»H'» 111 VHIlti 

Rev MwhJtt Stlvm 
in uilivmjlj'm call i 1 *?" " 



6- 



, Lutheran 

! Campus 

Ministry 

Thursday Supper. <» ['■ m 

it Luthc Itouj* 17-15 Andmon 

Sunday I vening Worship 
6pm. Pan for I h Chapel 

Pastor Patty Brown Harnett 
BMW 

w VAftfcl u .* J u.'' k n i akl 

— AU Are Welcome — 



Christian Science 
Society 



Sunday 10:30 a.m. 

Danforth Chapel 

KSU Campus 



Wed. 7:30 in Reading Room 

Reading Room open Tup* Tliui* 111 

105 N. 4th St. 



Agape Family Church 



I 2 I S. 4th - llimmuwn 

'"Inn ' . .1.1 ■!,, |l,l.|, 
. XMOim. *,>i\hip 
Viinlji "iQOp.nt. Fvcnina. Wonktp 

Ul "MOp.ia. H ■■( lUd 

V u'h I Ikcnricci 

MmtiM.iu im,i\s Huron 

121 i taJukMttl 

*** jgipriimiii.org 
\ 1 i i ii J u N ii c I itr 7i ] $ p.m. 
Cnllnp prilnwAlp 208 Uohxi 



85) 539-3570 



First Presbyterian 

^■m^ Church 



*>: 1 5 .i.m. Worship Service 

9: 1 5 t.m. Sunday School 

10:30 a.m. Worship Service 

I I : I S a.m. Contemporary 

Worship Service 

U ( Mil otiitrll. I'jsd.r 
801 l^Hven worth • 537 ORIS 



w * » .first urtMii.inli;! 1 1.111.4 inn 



wcw SSf™" 



IN 

QoHnwm 
Chuzoh 



1 1 Nirl 



Scnint Point; I'll Ilrnntlt 



785-537-7173 



mwh MeMvieMiiinimunitk mm 



Faith Evangelical Free Church 

• Worship dt 8 0O.9 30,1 1:00 

• Video Venue at 10:50 

• College class al 930 

■ 

1911 BtrnnRd 

776-2056 





I IKS! It IHIM CHI Rtll 

2121 Itlue IlilK KimcI 

S3M0I 

•il Suitdjl) Sdliml 

1 1:1 m, im SimJaj V\ . .i -shiji 
Praise TontT*ke Each Month 

w^»',cemendiivhrix,ui 
Baptist Campus Center 

1601 Andufson Ave 539 3051 



A lamily-ulino.snhert' church in the hWntcrian & 
Relormed Iradition, glcnfying ti*>d by: 

• ■ I'iii;«i»i 1 1 ■(•• I .Kid Nj\u ii |c*u» Chrirt, 

■ i f[iii|l)p|ii' t ' U In i , 1- In HHHI-.U t w ith tin llil 

• I'tongcli/liig tKi Hnrlil, ai»l nu 1 nirjyin^ gtnlU hmm'luiUs 
Son.l.is Servkr: in 11 lOun, Stwrti V*llc> Inn, f.10 S. Strnlc Di 
Sunday Eve. Bible Study: fc-Bprn ^~f W -f-f-v irrr^i^ 
Wedneaday Apolo^rtk-t: 8 I0|w { 1— I D I V j 

Mort- inr« v,v, rt tinliiiuli iuUi n r ^— ' ■ , 

„r 1. .11 Pa.Ii. 1 NjIi- 7SS ,17 4177 II HI 1)1. 1 Ml.R 



All .trt hcIi i urn ' 



n u ii t 



K-State Wesley 

wwwJi-5tate.edu/umcm 

ksuwesle70ksu.edu 

785.776.9278 

Worship & Dinner: 

Sunday, 6:45pm • 

College Ave. United Methodist Church 




€% 



UNIVERSITY 

t HHISUAN CHURCH 



1*1 1h* COjrrUM of riiflm. t |i ihWipij) 

i Od pm luni'dJi <onl*mpo'*'i IWNI 

IDI "i I 00 am tumdaiy £ &n lempof a' •, ItfWC* 

• Ml ncmiw \u^d«v t»*d<lioia- lajewej 

*-** uri^aphaftian tw| 



MANHATTAN 

iMENNONlTKCHltRCHl 

MKiil l-reimmi S3W079 

Wiirvhip I it: 45 SS 'i in 

: t 

■ Riihiiril Al Biiihjr.it irhnn;. PiWur. : 

k St. ii,- Siikk-in (n.iiip 

: mi* iiunli.H|jn k^ u. jiit:muiriil^_nc* ■ 

: Pmlmk l-i ,iih1 Ii'' Sunday i 

jllci » 



Grace 
Baptist 
Church 



m 



.'"'III 'kl.ns 2Ub I ..IStiln hikl 

4 Sunday Worship ♦ 
8:00,9:30,11:00 a.m. 

Hihlr i lunMO M0« n im* m 

■■i-i i ii 1 1 ii l .ii .»1 h I .ii.upsr. p in 

785-7760424 
www. gratebdiurch.org 



St. Isidore's 

Catholic Student 

Center 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Tuesday-Thurvday 10:00 p.m. 

Friday 12.10 p.m. 

Saturday 5 p.m. 

Sunday 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. 

Sun. 4:30 p.m., 6 p.m. 
Father Keith Weber Chaplain 

1711 Denison 539-74961 



RRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 
ELCA 

Worship: Sat S: 30 pm 

Sun 8:30 8rU :00 am 

suiiiUvSthiHilSMSam 



t all lor Summer 

Hours 

• 

Handkuppi-il 

Aitfisiblt 



h 



www.lirstlutheranmanhanan.org 
930 Poynb — 785 537 8532 



CmssRoaas 



^5 



■ 

kaVa^i 




nun 

Sr-lSpm T»Wc Mhwihip 

Tuesday 

7:lX)pm Yogi ti. \WiMtiiin 
I 

I \pll.U' • Ill'H.IIM'l ■ Hi'liill^ » SlTVC 



,V MANHATTAN JEWISH 
VV CONGREGATION 

Wonhl|i l-il 7 JO |ii» 
I:i0?l ttu-jlli Avr. MhiiImtuii 

Fftrmtir nr/f tHIrr' 

«»» in. i n lull. i n |r» nil ( i»nj| urn 

In ,hmi. i.iiu.n Hilh MM I I I 
Ihr |*i*itH iiuilfin tii.|iiini/ji Umi 

ww-w.k tlalr mIu liilW 



CALL ALEX & JOIN 
THE DIRECTORY 

■ Call 785-532-6560 i 



k 

new 

CHURCH! 



WORSHIP TIME if 



r-dajj jft« ilrtlf Htr 'hHfi. *«iv ' I 

i iMtm mhI i -mm i umi >■ ■■-■ 

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3 «W Cnm X* 

• >7 238' 



Peace Lutheran Church 

Worship Sunday? 



8:30 and IKK) 
< ooumpocar) 
<-^_ ' Soviet 5*0 p-in 

P-rTC-t 

I'jstoi Mkli.nl Ui- 

250(1 KimMI 

$39 "371 

«« n peace in you.org 

Wilh Christ... Gather... 
Grow ami Go Forth! 



Come Worship 
With Us 

1st Church of the Nazarene 
I Kimhall Ave 

9: JO Sunday Schiol 
10:40 Siiml.n Vmi .hip 
7:00 Wtd Hibk-Siii.iv. lccn% 

VmilhA College ininiMii nppaMHMK 

Si-iiii.i PMtof P»l rtiii.uiili 

SMKI 

<* m m . n ihiiIiii I Ian mi/ . ■ ■ rt: 




Mcthodiil Church 

U1KJTI 



Iradiltotul Hi" 
Sun M hi & i 
Stncur) 

Blended Worship 
Sun i I inn Harm Vein in ■ mm 

Surt&t } Srlaaj " ■( i jm 

('ommuanm ,\fn ;, | 

v.XIpji 



MANHATTAN FRIENDS QUAKER MEETING 

Un programmed Quiet Meetings, 10-1 lam 

First Sunday of each month, Sept. -May 

UFM Building, 1221 Thurston 

Discussion and Visiting, 1 1 am-noon 

Hisinrndllv rootc-d in ihe Judco-C:hntiii;m iradition, 

lomemporarv unpro^utniTird Quaker Meeting! nlten 

un I Hilt- both ( !lni>ti,ui and m m-f in isti.ui members. 

Manliall.il] I iiciiiIn sii|)piirl llir teilimonict of 

Simplicity, Community, Non-viokncc, Sm ui \, n, m 

l-.i|ii.iln\ ul race, gender, sexual orientation, 
phytit .il aiiiliiy, aR«', class and natiuiiality. 

Other Meetings during the month in family home.s. 
For more information, call 539-2046 or 539-26% 



PAGt 4 



OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



Those cryin eyes 

Garnering sympathy often dishonest but effective politics 





STEVEN 
KELLY 



Minutes after the results of the 
New Hampshire Democratic prima- 
ry were released, news of Hillary Clin- 
ton's victory over Ba- 
rack Obama spread na- 
tionwide like the latest 
celebrity scandal. 

It seems analysts 
were wrong in pre- 
dicting Obama would 
take New Hampshire, 
though he was poll- 
ing well ahead of Hil- 
lary before the votes 
started pouring in 
This surprising turn- 
around victory led 

many to wonder why the experts missed 
the mark. While some people chalked 
up her victory to coincidence, others 
pointed their fingers at a more ques- 
tionable reason - the sympathy vote. 

On Jan 7, just one day before the 
primary, Hillary met with New Hamp- 
shire voters in a coffee shop to answer 
questions. 

At one point in the session, she 
went off on an impassioned tangent 

"I just don't want to see us fall 
backward as a nation," Hillary said, her 
eyes glistening with tears. "I mean, this 
is very personal for me Not just politi- 
cal. I see what's happening. We have to 
reverse it. Some people think elections 
are a game: who's up or who's down 
It's about our country. It's about our 
kids' future. It's about all of us togeth- 
er." 

The rhetoric alone wasn't unique or 
exceptionally moving, but the fact thai 
it was coupled with tears made it stand 
out like a lime-green suit at a funeral 

And this is from Hillary of all peo- 
ple - a woman who has often been la- 
beled an "ice queen" for her frosty dis 
position. The real reason for the ruckus 
is not the tears themselves, but the mo- 
tivation behind them Many people har- 
bor suspicions that the tears were fake 
- a political ploy to counter whispers 
of her inhumanity and make her more 
appealing to the public. 

Bill Kristol, editor of the political- 



ly conservative magazine The Week- 
ly Standard, even went as far as saying 
on the Fox News Channel that night, 
"It's the tears. She pretended lo cry, the 
women fell sorry for her, and she won." 

Though the primary's results con- 
firm that more women voted for Hillary 
than for Obama - 47 percent to 34 per- 
cent, respectively - people like Kristol 
go (oo far by claiming she won because 
of the women's sympathy vote. For one, 
that kind of chauvinistic thinking does 
nothing but aggravate the already sore 
issue of gender equality. I realize it's no 
secret women are generally more sen- 
sitive and sympathetic than men. Still, 
that doesn't mean a few tears render 
them incapable of making rational deci- 
sions 

Besides, 1 doubt the women of New 
Hampshire - or women in general - 
appreciate being slapped with a com- 
ment that essentially refers to them as 
emotional saps. 

Hillary's critics don't want lo see a 
gender rift appear within the electorate, 
1 think they should start choosing their 
words a little more wisely. 1 can't rule 
out the possibility that the tears were 
fake, but if that was the case, I can't 
say I'd blame her Pulling a stunt like 
that might be a bit underhanded and 
dishonest, but it's smart politics, and 
Hillary's opponents know it 

If appealing to people's emotions 
gives you even the slightest edge over 
your opponents, why not go for it? 1 
bet the other candidates wouldn't hesi- 
tate to show a little feeling if they were 
certain il would gain them a few votes. 
Does this mean we might see other can- 
didates dissolving into waterworks? I 
wouldn't count on il, mainly because I 
don't think they would want to risk ru- 
ining their generally stolid reputations. 

Bui hey. it's still a long time un- 
til November. Perhaps we'll see a few 
more showers after ail. 



Steven Kelly is a sophomore in politkil science 
and history. Please send comments to opinion • 
ipub.kiu.tdu. 



TO THE POINT 



THE FOURUM 

I7H5I 195-4444 

The Campus Fourum is the 

Gollecjian'i anonymous call-in 

system. The fourum is edited to 

eliminate vulgar, racist, obscene 

and libelous comments. The 

comments ate not the opinion 

of the CoHeqlan nor are they 

endorsed by the editorial staff. 



The Slum laughs it snow. 

Hey. AW i girl at I HOP same time net) 
Tuesday? 

Its onl» a JO and t girl ilrudy went to 
the wrong (lass What a start! 

lto*elr» sound ol students in the Stimi 



Collegian 



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Students can make a difference in presidential selection 



In the New Hamp- 
shire presidential pri- 
maries, 271 percent 
more 
young 
people 
voted 
com- 
pared 
to the 

2004 primaries, accord- 
ing to research from the 
University of Maryland 

Young voters, includ- 
ing K-State students, 
have taken advantage 



TOM POINT i win 
editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 



of the social -networking 
abilities of the 21st cen- 
tury to organize groups 
on Web sites like Face- 
book com and also have 
used the Internet to 
make it easier for young 
voters to contribute to 
campaigns by donating 
money or volunteering 
To show how much 
young voters can make 
a difference, look at Re- 
publican presidential 
candidate Ron Paul. 
He raised more than $4 



million in one day from 
private donors, many of 
whom were young vot- 
ers fed up with the cur- 
rent political climate. 

With the tightness of 
both parties' presiden- 
tial races, younger vot- 
ers have a chance, even 
with a single vote, to 
help choose their pre- 
ferred candidate. 

The Kansas caucus- 
es are approaching in 
a few weeks, and with 
no clear front-runners, 



Kansas could be a big- 
ger part in this year's 
race compared to the 
last several elections. 
Usually, the Democrat- 
ic and Republican pres- 
idential candidates have 
sealed victories by the 
time the Kansas caucus- 
es take place. 

The deadline to reg- 
ister for the Democrat- 
ic caucus is Jan. 21, and 
the deadline for the Re- 
publican caucus is Jan. 
25. To register, all stu- 



dents have to do is 
go to the Riley Coun- 
ty Web site, print the 
registration form and 
mail it or turn it in to 
the county clerk's of- 
fice. If students are reg- 
istered somewhere else, 
they can still register in 
Manhattan. 

It's quick and easy, 
and for a change, Kan- - 
sans 1 votes might actu- 
ally help shape the race 
for the White House oh 
both sides of the aisle. . 



Giving is better than receiving during holidays, all year-round 




MARX 
.WAMPLER 



Americans spend a lot of money 
during the Christmas season. 

I am not trying to send anyone 
on a guilt trip, 
but look at some 
of these figures. 
Last year, the Na- 
tional Retail Fed 
eration predict 
ed $4574 billion 
would be spent 
during the holi- 
days The group 
called it a bad year 
compared to what 
is normally spent. 
Our minds can't 

really comprehend a figure that large. 
To put it into perspective, at the 2007 
G-fj summit. President Bush promised 
$30 billion to fight Al DS, malaria and 
tuberculosis in Africa. 

The NRF also estimated that $20 
billion would be spent the day after 
Thanksgiving. So even during what the 
NRF deems a bad year, we spend $427 
billion more on Christmas gifts than 
on fighting AIDS in Africa and only 
$10 billion less on a single shopping 
day 

Giving and getting gifts is fun So 
if you think I am saying wc should all 
stop, you're missing the point; we lust 
need to scale back. 

According to Associated Con- 



tent's Web site, the average household 
spent more that) $500 on gifts this 
year. Why couldn't that figure be $250, 
with the other half going to something 
or someone who needs it more? 

When I asked my brother what 
he was going to spend his Christ- 
mas money on, he said he gave it to a 
school in Sudan thai his high school 
has partnered with. The money will 
buy books and food for children 
whose families would otherwise not be 
able lo afford it. 

With this in mind. I looked at the 
guitar pedal I bought with my Christ- 
mas money There is nothing wrong 
with buying myself a guitar pedal for 
Christmas, but 1 realized my brother 
used his money in a much more mean- 
ingful way than 1 did. 

You don't have to send your mon- 
ey across the world Give it to the sin 
gle mother across the street to help 
pay for groceries or a couple restau 
rant visits, or share it with (he Salva- 
tion Army to help them buy coats and 
gloves. 

One friend was given extra Christ- 
mas money and told by her parents 
that she could keep it or give it to 
someone who she saw and felt needed 
it. My friend gave the money to a lady 
who said it would change her whole 
holiday season, because she would 
now be able to buy gifts for her kids. 



My friend said it was the best Christ 
mas she can remember. 

Other friends participated in 
a movement called the Ad- 
vent Conspiracy, slarted by 
people in Portland, Ore , 
who feel holiday spending is 
out of control. People who 
participate donate money in 
family or friends' names 
toward clean water ef- 
forts for African vil- 
lages On Christmas, 
the participant gives 
the family member or 
friend a card that shows 
the amount donat- 
ed along with a water 
bottle as a reminder 
of the gift's purpose 
Their Web site, www. 
Adven tConspnacy. org, 
tells more about the 
group's purpose 

It's hard 
lo rebel against Amer- 
ican expectations of 
h i gge rand -better gift 
exchanging during 
the holidays. Though 
it's a little late for the 
2007 holiday season, 
the concept still applies 
throughout the year. 

When December rolls 



around again, think about spending a 
little less on yourself and more on peo 
pie who don't have as much, tt can ! 
make a difference in someone 

else's life. 



Mar*Wampi*rKajunio* 
m print journalism. 
Pitas* s*rul (wnnwnts lo 
opinion jvpofr./kfuedii 




Nat* Schmidt 

COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGES 



More young voters involved in election process 



This will be the first article 
in a five-week series examin- 
ing the voting behavior of dif- 
ferent groups within society 
and their effects on the 200S 
presidential election In the 
next four weeks, the Collegian 
will examine tlte electoral ef- 
fects of the female, black, mil 
itary and religious communi- 
ties nationally and locally, in 
that order 

By Deborah Muhweii 
KANSAS STATE COUEWAN 

K State student AJoiizu 
limes is joining his peers in the 
young-voter revolution. 

Jones, freshman in con- 
struction science and man 
agement, registered to vote be- 
cause he said it seemed like the 
right thing to do. 

"It's very important to be- 
come involved with the elec- 
tions and learn what's going 
on." he said "Its our future" 

During the New Hamp- 
shire presidential primaries, 
there was a 271 percent in- 
crease in young voters com- 
pared to the 2004 elections 
This percentage increase rep- 
resents 84,230 individuals be- 
tween the ages of 18 and 29 
years of age who voted in New 
Hampshire on Ian 9., accord- 
ing to a revised estimate from 



the University of Maryland 

Students for Obama. an 
organization to support the 
campaign of Barack Obama. 
a Democratic senator from 
Illinois, is helping to raise 
awareness of the election at 
KState 

The KState chapter is 
having a kick-off event at 5 JO 
p.m. today in the KState Stu- 
dent Union Room 206 

"We want to get every- 
body back together from break 
and get in contact with those 
who have just started paying 
attention - especially due to 
Iowa," said Bryan Cox, junior 
in anthropology and econom- 
ics and a member of the Stu- 
dents for Obama campaign 

Cox said he comes from 
a predominantly Republican 
family. Despite some pres- 
sure from his family to consid- 
er changing parties, he said his 
family is satisfied that he is in- 
volved in the elections at his 
age 

"Being a Democrat at 
K- St ale is like being a student." 
he said "Like every student 
here at K State, you're having 
something you're working to- 
ward. Being an Obama sup- 
porter, it's nice to know that I 
am having an impact." 

More young voters are 
volunteering and paying atten- 




tion in the 2008 elections be- 
cause of the efforts of organi- 
zations like Rock the Vote, a 
non-profit organization based 
in Washington. DC. which 
uses the entertainment in- 
dustry to get youth involved 
in the political process Rock 
the Vote has worked with ce- 
lebrities like Eva Mendes. Jus- 
tin Timberlake, Sean "P Did 
dy" Combs and Jada Ptnkett- 
Smith 

Rock the Vote communi- 
cations director Chrissy Faes- 
sen said she got involved be- 
cause of the organization's 
purpose and strategy to reach 
youth. 

"Rock the Vole is a great 
organization that engages 
youth through what they're in 
terested in to really reach out," 
she said "It's an exciting year 
with the new technology such 



as Facebook and Youlube 
With all these, we can utilize 
them for polities' purposes." 

Many organizations are 
taking advantage of this ad- 
vancement in technology to 
get involved und reach out, K- 
State's Young Democrats and 
College Republicans have Fa- 
cebook groups to reach stu- 
dents. 

George Weston, graduate 
student in sociology and Col- 
lege Republicans president, 
said political organizations are 
good places fur students to get 
involved in the political pro- 
cess 

"This is our future," Weston 
said. "What about Social Secu- 
rity and healthcare? Who's go 
ing to have the best plan to fix 
these issues? Being able to get 
involved and discuss with oth- 
ers around you lakes your one 
vote, and it could become two, 
four or even eight voles" 

Cox said he wants to en- 
courage others lo get involved 
and have their vote make a dif- 
ference. 

"Your efforts can count 
when you actively work with 
other people and put your 
viewpoint forward," he said, 
"And with that, you can in- 
fluence others in an impor- 
tant way - it's an accomplish- 
ment." 



Question: What are the issues 

that make it important for 

young people to vote? 




The student bans, also unu*rsal health cut 
ts a pretty good thing as well; 

Nkkia Delaware 
ll'NH IK IN MODERN LANGUAGE 



Dataware 




Drown 




'l think the war is probably the biggest 
one right now. There it health car* and 
all that but I think the war has obviously 
been the biggest headline, it has kind of 
defined our generation tight now'. 

Britton Drown 

FRESHMAN IN I'Kt |OL KNA1.1SM 

ANU MASS COMMUNICATIONS. 



'It's just whatever you believe in. For me 
I like Edwards because he Is saying that 
he might pass a bill where we can go to 
school tor free and that would be really 

nice because I'm tired of paying $ 1 2,000. 
It's worth it." 

Krittopher Russell 
SOPHOMORE IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 



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AREYOU PROUD? 

IT'S BACK, BUT NOT IN BLACK. 

Come to the KState Student Union, Feb. 18-25, to make a donation for 
Student Opportunity Awards and get your free 2008 KState Proud shirt 



J00B K Sutr frowt student t jmp«gn spomwrt by 



PAGE 6 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 

Creighton 
loss sparks 

6-game 
win streak 



By Joel Wilson 
KANSAS flATl I miK.IAS 

When the K State wom- 
en's basketball team fell to 
5 5 toward the end of the 
noneonferencc season, the 
Wildcats were in need of a 
switch 

It turns out it was a 69- 
62 loss to Creighton that mo- 
tivated K State to come off 
their winter break and surge 
to six straight wins and a JO 
conference record 

'I think our major turn- 
ing point was after the Creigh- 
ton game," sophomore Ashley 
Sweat said "We were disap- 
pointed, and »c were going 
home for break, and 1 think 
it gave us all time to think 
about what wc want this sea 
son when we came back from 
break " 

Sweat said the team de 
cided it needed to start win- 
ning games as soon as possi- 
ble when it traveled to Los 
Angeles for a two-game tour- 
nament 

K-State swept the tour- 
nament and returned home 
for its final noneonference 
contest against Western Illi- 
nois The Wildcats won 68- 
53 and faced the challenge of 
a two-game road trip to Tex- 
as to play two ranked teams 

"People are impatient 
nowadays.' K State coach 
Deb Patterson said They 
want things right away and 
they really lose perspective 
on the fact that the schedule 
we played was a tough sched- 
ule" 

The Wildcats knocked off 
Texas A&M and Texas to sur 
vivc the Lone Star trip with 
a 2-0 record that built early 
conference confidence 

Last season, the Wildcats 
lost confidence wilh the inju- 
ry to then-sophomore Marl 
ies Gipson Th<* experience 
K State gained after her in 
jury has contributed to the 
Wildcats playing more as a 
team 

"I think we've just been 
playing together so well, and 
I think if we keep playing like 
we are right now. we can re 
ally do some damage" Sweat 
said. 

Patterson identified the 
biggest difference between 
now and when the team was 
5 5 is the way learn members 

it* WOMEN Piatt) 



WOMEN S TENNIS 

Cats ready to 
see tourney 
competition 



Stiff Reports 
UMUSSTAT1 ' DUB 

A sense uf deja vu is hit 
ting (he K Stale women s ten- 
nis team as it prepares for 
its first meet of 2008 at the 
Georgia Bulldog Invitational 
on Saturday in Athens Ga. 

The tournament always 
features the tennis teams 
from K-State, Troy Slate. 
Mississippi Stale and Geor- 
gia 

The Wildcats look to 
match their efforts from 
last fall by getting off to a 
hot start in the spring Se- 
nior Viviana Yrureta is com- 
ing off a 6 6 record in singles 
play for the fall, including 
a stretch of five wins in six 
matches In doubles action, 
sophomore Natasha Vieira 
and junior Katerina Kudlack- 
ova make up the top doubles 
team coming into the spring 
In the fall, the two registered 
a 5-5 record, including a four- 
match win streak 

After this tournament, 
the Wildcats begin dual play 
on Feb 2 against Syracuse at 
Ahearn Field House During 
the spring K State will play 
10 teams in the tup 75 and 
five teams in the top-J5 of 
the preseason Intercollegiate 
Tennis Association Rankings 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



Bringing it home 




Photo* by Christopher Hanewinckcl | COLltGUN 



The K-State track team will host the Wildcat Invitational today and Saturday at Ahearn Field Moos*. Coach Otiff Roveito wd the women's team is a more balanced 
team while the mens team relies on a few standout performers 



K-State track team 
to host weekend 
meet at Ahearn 



By Wendy Haw 
KAMSAS STATI ODUKtSJ 

After opening its sea- 
son in Fayetteville. Ark. 
at the Arkansas Invitation- 
al. K-State will face sever- 
al track learns at Ahearn 
Field House today and 
Saturday to kick off what 
should be a busy season 

Friday's action will 
include men's events like 
the weight throw and high 
lump Those events will be- 
gin ai 4 p m . and the run- 
ning events starting at 6 30 
On Saturday, the worn 
en will be in the spotlight. 
with the long jump start- 
ing the day at 12 15 pm 
The running events for the 
women will start at 2 30 

Coach Cliff Roveito 
said although some of his 
athletes biggest COHipc 
will be their fellow 
teammates this weekend 
some athletes are slill try- 
ing to find their niche 

I of the other 
kids thai were compel 
ing in the fall have com- 
peted a lew tunes," Rovei- 
to said Theres still a few 
that have been competing, 
but not in iheir best events 



yet Over the next couple 
weeks, we'll see them in 
what their strong events 
are. and after thai, we'll 
hjve a better idea of what 
kind of a team we have 

At .Arkansas, there 
were several Wildcats 
who made a difference on 
K- State's final results |u 
nior Scott Sellers placed 
first in the high jump. 
clearing 7 feet, two-and-a- 
quarter inches 

Placing second in the 
running events were junior 
Mike Myer. senior Don- 
niece Fairish, junior Lil- 
ian! Mendez and sopho- 
more Beverly Ramos 

Sophomore Alcxan 
dra Gonzalez set a person- 
al best in pole vault with a 
vault of 15 feet Gonzalez 
was only the third Wildcat 
i k Slate history to reach 
the 13-foot mark in the 
pole vault 

However, when look- 
ing at a team, it's not about 
the individual accomplish- 
ments as much as how 
complete the team is. Rov- 
eito said 

Our sport is *er\ 
unique in that you can eval- 
uate teams and programs 







in a lot of different a 
he said Vu; can look at 
a learn as to how complete 
they are You can look at 
it in terms of a cenatrasce 
level team Our oanta 
is nut a series of competi- 
tions Where you place at 
the conference chant pi un 
ship is |usl in that two-day 
meet " 

The biggest disadvan- 
tage (or K-State Ruffel be 
in the teams youth Rial] 
to said while the women'! 
team is more complete, the 
mtn'l team has stand -uui 
individuals 

I think our worn 
en's team is a strong ' 
he said I think there's 
enough bullets to | 
the conference chant] 
ship and score a significant 



number of points I know 

what our team has bul 1 
don t know what other 
teams have Over the ir-xi 
couple of weeks we'll have 
some idea 

"On the itu 
we've got individuals who 
will do extremely well at 
the conference level and 
at the national level, but 
we JUSI don't have j* many 
bullets as we do un the 
women's side 

Most of the reason for 
the lack of depth on the 
men's side jj doe n (faun 
cial j id Mure lhan 50 per- 
cent of the- men's side are 
underclassmen Roveito 
said there will be move fi 
nancial aid available nexl 
Ml to bring in more ath 



U'e didni complete 
our team this year SO M 
WOllU have mure aid avail- 
able tor next year he said 
\\c It-It we had in oppor- 
tunity to briny in a great- 
: nber ol high-quality 
athletes lie xi year 

wiih the competition 
this weekend not being as 
rttfl as it will K- later this 
semester. Rovetto said he's 
lost ready to see where the 
team standi thus weekend 

"its an opportunity in 
that its a In n tie meet and 

lot necessarily g inch 
level meet' he said "Our 

. ers and jumpers will 
be competing and most of 
theif major competition 
is against their 
mates We'll see how things 
transpire. 




Beasley-led Wildcats to face tough test 
against No. 10 Texas A&M on Saturday 



lon«trun Knight I O H1EGIAS 

Point guard Jacob Pullen doves the lane m the final seconds of 
the game to draw Michael Beasley's defender away from him This 
allowed Beasley to have an easy two-point (ayup for the game- 
winning basket against Oklahoma Jan 1 2 in Norman. 



By Wendy Haun 
KAW lUltilAK 

Though K-State is 10 in 
conference play for the first 
time in eight years. Ihe men s 
team cannot rest on its lau- 
rels 

It I the Big 12," said 
coach Frank Martin after the 
Oklahoma game last Satur 
day. I said it the other day 
we have 16 quality games 
looking at us in the face " 

One of those quality 
games will be at 3 pm Sat 
urday at Bramlage Colise- 
um, when No 10 Texas A&M 
(17-2, 1-1 Big 12 Conferencei 
comes to Bramlage Coliseum 
Texas A&M lost Wednesday 
to in -state rival Texas Tech in 
Lubbock, 53-68, and Aggies 
coach Mark Turgeon said the 
team hopes to remain above 
500 in conference play 

"We have to go out and 
prove that we are going to be 
a great road team, and this 
week will give us the oppor- 



tunity to do it.' Titrgaon said 

"I think you have the 
chance to either have a ape 
eial season or you have the 
chance to have an abuv. 
erage season, and if you want 
lo have a special season you 
have to learn how to win on 
the road It's a big week for 
us. and our young men know 
it. and our coaches know u 
and n we will be prepared" 

Leading the Aggies in 
scoring is junior guard |osh 
Carter, who is averaging 1 5 4 
points per game Freshman 
forward DeAndre Jordan, 
leads the team in rebound 
ing, averaging almost a 
boards per game. 

K State (11-4, 1-0 Big 121 
leads Ihe conference in re- 
bounding, averaging almost 
44 boards per game Fresh 
man forward Michael Bea- 
sley is the leading scorer in 
the conference, averaging al- 
most 25 points per game He 
also is the conference's lead- 
ing rebo under, averaging 13 



per game 

I n hman gu.trd laeoh 
Pullen, who h LS iveraged 
nine pointl -Hid more lhan 
three assists per game, said 
the win at Oklahoma was 
good for ihe young Wildcats 

"ll was a gimd win, espe- 
cially on then ad i'ullensaid 
"As far as Ihe atmosphere. n<£ 
beiny at home and having oiXr 

I d, it was difficult It was 

■ I win for us ll was re 
ally a confidence boost for lis 
because now. we're thinking 
that we can beal anyone ip 
i lie Wig 12" 

The Wildcats have hadii 
full week lo prepare for Tri- 
as A&M a tad Martin said he 
wasn't very happy about 

"At this time of year, 
you want to play." he said 
"You don't want to have lorffe 
breaks between games, bul jl 
is what it is We've tried to 
break the week down as beat 
as we can so we don't ovet- 
load the guvs down at the end 
ol tin, week 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 7 



Low supply, high demand cause egg prices 
to increase, animal sciences professor says 



CASUAL CONVERSATION 



ly Owtn Kennedy 
KANSAS STATE COLLEWAN 

Breakfast is the most 
important meal of the day, 
but soon it might become 
the most expensive 

The price of eggs in the 
United States, has more than 
doubled in the last year - 
from 69 cents per dozen to 
$1 48 per dozen, according 
to the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

One K- State associate 
professor says a couple of 
the reasons for the increase 
are low supply and high de- 
mand 

Scott Beyer, associate 
professor of animal scienc- 
es and industry, said volun 
tary regulations regarding 
the lower amount of hens in 
a facility have had some ef- 
fect, since space is limited. 

"Welfare regulations are 
asking producers to put few- 
er birds in a house," Bey- 
er said. "Where you might 
have once had 1 10,000 birds 
in a house, you now have 
103,000. Fewer hens equal 
few eggs" 

Adding to the shortage, 
Beyer said prices associat- 
ed with raising poultry also 
have risen, causing some 
producers to slow expan- 
sion. 

He said automated facil- 
ities require large amounts 
of steel, which are expen- 
sive. 

He also said uncertainty 
influences a producer's deci- 
sions. 

"People are a little bit 
worried," Beyer said. "Steel 
prices are high, interest rates 
and feed cost are high, and 
the economy is a concern. 
You might not invest $20 



million if you don't know 
what's going to happen in 
two years" 

Since corn and grains 
are essential to raising chick 
ens, Beyer sail demand for 
ethanol might influence pric 
es as well 

"It has less to do with 
how popular ethanol is, and 
more to do with the price of 
grain associated with etha 

"Oil is skyrocketing." he 
said. "Some people would 
put fuel in their cars be- 
fore they put food in their 
mouths, sad bul true" 

Demand for eggs also 
has increased recently, Bey- 
er said, possibly because 



many misconceptions about 
egg consumption and health 
problems, namely high cho 
lesterol, have been proven 
untrue. 

Ryan Meireis. assistant 
manager of Kay's Apple Mar 
kel. said he has noticed egg 
prices rising in the store 

"I've definitely seen 
prices go up, especially in 
the last year," Meireis said 
"Probably about 50 percent 
or more." 

Beyer said Kansas and 
the Midwest have some of 
the cheaper eggs in the coun- 
try because many uf the eggs 
are produced in the region. 

He said the East and 
West coasts have seen high 



price hikes 

These hikes also are be- 
ing noticed overseas This 
is because of high shipping 
costs for eggs and feed 

Meireis said customers 
are not the only people af 
fecled by the price increas- 
es. 

He said store owners are 
having to pay more for eggs 
and egg products, and stores 
are not benefi tting from high 
prices 

He said some customers. 
have complained about the 
prices, but most have paid 
the higher price with little 
concern. 

People got to eat eggs." 
he said 



RANGE OF PRICES FOR THE SOUTH CENTRAL 
REGION OF THE USDA EGG MARKET 



$.90 



| MP 



k 



I S.70 



$.60 



$.50 



JANUARY 12, 2007 



$1.60 

c 

I $1.50 
I 
f $1.40 

$130 
$1.20 



JANUARY 14, 2008 



Extra Urge Large Medium 



Extra Large large Medium 
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture 




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PAGE 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



U-WIRE 



U.S. Supreme Court expands 
vague definition of child porn 



lHU>AIIYUNIVHtSElBYU( 

PROVO. Utah - The 
Supreme Court will weigh 
in this month on the consti- 
tutionality ol a federal law 
thai expands the definition 
of child pornography in 
an effort to crack down on 
cyberspace prowlers 

The court will decide if 
two phrases in the PROTECT 
{Prosecutorial Remedies and 
Other Tools to End the Ex 
ploitalion of Children TodayJ 
Act of 2003 arc unlawful- 
ly vague and overbroad The 
court is expected to lake t la- 
case under advisement after 
oral arguments and issue its 
opinion before the end o( its 
current term in |une 2008 

ORIGIN OF THE PROBLEM 

The issue surfaced af- 
ter Michael Williams pleaded 
guilly to two counts of child 
pornography: possessing the 
material and "pandering" 
(promoting) the images 

In an Internet sting up 
eration, Williams nflered sex- 
ually explicit pictures of his 
4 -year-old daughter to an un 
dercover federal agenl Au- 
thorities also found 22 im- 
ages of underage children on 
Williams' computer. 

Following Williams' ap- 
peal, the 11th Circuit Court 
of Appeals overturned ihe 
pandering conviction, calling 
the PROTECT Act's language 
"impermissibly vague and fa 
cially unconstitutional " 

The pandering section of 
Ihe PROTECT Act was the 
latest of several attempts by 
Congress to strengthen pen- 
alties for Internet predators. 

In one of those attempts. 
Congress passed an ami -por- 
nography law that prohibit- 
ed the creation of computer- 
generated images of children 
because the virtual children 
were not "real" The Supreme 
Court struck this down in 
2002 for infringing on free 
dom of expression. 

Juan Becerra, Salt Lake 
City FBI spokesman, said if 
the courl upheld Williams' 
appeal, it would definitely 
lake an arrow out of the law 
enforcement's quiver, but it 
wouldn't change their strong 
stance or the charges against 
those who engage in child 
pornography We're still go- 
ing to go after these guys as 
hard and aggressively as be 



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fore," he said. 

Becerra also said tins 
area leads the nation in child 
pornography investigations, 
arrests and convictions 

Pandering, however, spe- 
cifically prohibits advertising, 
promoting, presenting or so- 
liciting "any material or pur- 
ported material in a manner 
that reflects the belief, or that 
is intended to cause .mother 
to believe, that the material 
or purported material" con 
tains child pornography 

11k controversy grew out 
of the two subjective phras 
cs. which Williams claims are 
loo vague and smother free 
speech "reflects the belief." 
and "intended to cause an- 
other to believe." 

A person does not have 
to possess the unlawful ma- 
terial lo be charged with pan- 
dering; merely describing it 
in a way that "reflects the be- 
lief" that one possesses it is 
enough 

t 'i mgress made il clear 
that such a strict law is nee 
iry because "even fraudu- 
lent offers to buy or sell un 
protected child pomogra 
pin help lo sustain the illegal 
market for this material " 

RESEARCHING THE NEED 
Shoringup the PROTECT 

Act against critics, CongNtf 
researched 15 rulings to jus- 
tify a "compelling interest" in 
the continued enforceability 
end. effectiveness of iti pro 

hibilions status! child pur 
nography They cited a 1982 
child pornography cue, New 
York v Ferber, where the Su- 
preme Court wrote, "the rnoM 
expeditious if not I lie most 
practical melhud of law en- 
forcement may be to dry up 
the market for this material 
by imposing severe criminal 
penalties on persons selling, 
advertising or otherwise pro 
muling the product 

The Free Speech Colli 
lion, a watchdog organization 
for the adult novelty and en 
lertainmenl industry ttu fol 
lowed Williams' ease I ' 
ly, and a spokesman says the 
current act makes n a Feder- 
al offense U) merely describe 
a slick figure as child pornog 
raphy. 

Reed Lee. lawyer and 

FSC board member said, 

Prescribing to such a law 

would have a chilling affect 

on speech" 



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with the case is relevant to 
the adult industry it repre- 
sents because many adult 
produce*! bank on such de- 
scriptions, videos, magazines 
and internet sites commonly 
display words such as "very 
young." "school girls" and 
even, child" to interest view- 
ers "any of which could be 
argued as pandering child 
porn," Lee said 

"If there were a narrow 
enough provision, we would 
agree lo il," Lee said "But 1 
|ust can 1 believe that there's 
enough |child pornography) 
nut there lo justify such a re- 
striction " 

SOME ARE SKEPTICAL 

FBI officials who spoke 
lo the Daily Universe didn't 
teem sympathetic toward 
Williams or those using free 
tpeect) in sell pornography 
with youthful lilies 

"Take that |pandering 
section | away, protect them 
with the First Amendment 
and watch these [offenders! 
freely talk about and embel- 
lish what they've done or 
dream ol doing to these litt It- 
kids, ' said an FBI sex abuse 
specialist out of Los Angeles, 
who asked to remain anon- 
ymous because he is not an 
official spokesman. "That 
kind of talk encourages oth- 
er perverts lo do the same 
(things j" 

Vice president of Inter 
national High Technology 
Crime Investigation Associa- 
tion An Bowker, who works 
closely wilh the FBI. echoed 
ihe former agent, dubbing the 
Internet a kind of support 
group for predators 

"Before the advent of ihe 
Internet, individuals with dc- 
\ latu tendencies usually were 
isolated," Bowker said. "To- 
day, however, offenders feel 
norma) because they see from 
chat rooms and Web sites that 
many other individuals have 
the same interests Thus, the 
behavior becomes reinforced, 
perhaps emboldening them to 
com mi I acts, such as sex with 
a child, in the real world" 

Many legal observers ex- 
pect what many enforcement 
niiicials fear: the court will 
uphold ihe overturned de- 
cision and recant Williams' 
"pandering'" charge, sending 
Coagrett back to find other 
ways to prosecute predators. 



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Voters question relevance of 2008 

candidates' gender, racial differences 

at Democratic presidential debate 



THE REBEL YELL(UNLV) 

LAS VEGAS - One is 
black One is a woman One 
is white. 

One of the questions 
posed at Tuesday night's 
Democratic presidential de- 
bate at Cash man Center on 
Las Vegas Boulevard; How 
much does this mailer? 

MINORITY REPORT 

"Sen. jUarack] Obama 
and 1 agree completely that 
neither race nor gender 
should be a part of (his cam 
paign," New York Sen Hil- 
lary Clinton said, 

While Clinton, Obama 
and former Sen. John Ed- 
wards all agreed that char- 
acter and the ability to spurk 
change should be the defin- 
ing factors for voters, one 
viewer who submitted a ques 
lion noted that the potential 
to break historical barriers is 
impossible to ignore. 

"The policy differenc- 
es among the remaining can- 
didates are so slight that we 
appear to be choosing on 
the basis of personality and 
life story," San Diego, Calif. 
voter Margaret Wells wrote 
"Why should 1, as a progres- 
sive woman, not resent being 
forced to choose between the 
first viable female candidate 
and the first viable African - 
American candidate?" 

The debate was intend- 
ed to highlight minority is- 
sues, being nationally spon- 
sored by the Nevada Dem- 
ocratic Party, the U.S. His- 
panic Chamber of Commerce 
and 100 Black Men of Amer- 
ica, Inc. Local partners were 
the African -American Dem- 
ocratic Leadership Council, 
Impactu and the College of 
Southern Nevada 

However, with issues 
such as candidates' individ- 
ual backgrounds, the general 
economy, the war in Iraq and 
Yucca Mountain dominating 
the debate, many felt minori- 
ty issues were glazed over. 

"I didn't even hear the 
words 'affirmative action' 
once," CSN history and po- 
litical science professor Alan 
Balboni said, noting that bill 
ing the event as a debate on 
black-brown issues may have 
been misleading. "I don't 
even know if 1 heard the 
word discrimination"' 

Fellow CSN professor 
Mike Green shared a senti 
ment of disappointment after 
the debate. 

"Nothing against MSN- 
BC, but they focused more 
on the horse race and the 



controversies." Green said. 

The top three Demo- 
cratic Party contenders - a 
fourth presidential candi- 
date. US Rep Dennis Ku- 
cinich of Ohio, was excluded 
from the debate by MSNBC 
- spent much of the remain- 
ing time attempting lo distin- 
guish themselves from their 
counterparts. 

OTHER ISSUES MATTER 

Clinton highlighted her 
continual opposition toward 
using Yucca Mountain to 
store nuclear wasle. criticiz- 
ing Edwards for twice voting 
in favor of the it and Obama 
for being financially backed 
by an energy company in 
support of the repository 

In his rebuttal. Edwards 
said he made those votes 
before new evidence and 
forged paperwork were dis- 
covered He also tried to dis- 
tance himself from the other 
two candidates by saying he's 
the only candidate adamant- 
ly opposed to nuclear pow- 
er, as well as coal -fired pow- 
er plants 

Other commentators in 
the spin room after the debate 
pointed out lhat many of the 
general issues addressed, like 
the subprime mortgage rales 
leading to a wave of home 
foreclosures, are of particular 
interest to minorities 

When it comes to fore- 
closures per capita, Nevada, 
a state with a large minority 
population, has been hit the 
hardest by the housing crisis 

Clinton said during the 
debate that blacks and His 
panics were some of the most 
vulnerable during this crisis, 
and the candidate was more 
outspoken than her counter 
parts on her plan lo freeze 
interest rates to prevent fore- 
closures as well as hold a 
moratorium on foreclosures 
for 90 days if and after sworn 
into office 

"The issues lhat face all 
Americans face minorities 
in sometimes a much more 
acute fashion." said Rodney 
Slater, the secretary of trans- 
portation under Bill Clin- 
ton's administration, who 
was there to support Hillary 
Clinton. "Educational oppor- 
tunities are especially impor- 
tant when it comes to Afri- 
can-Americans and Latinos." 

Education took the spot- 
light several times during the 
televised debate. 

Obama said good an- 
swers are not what the gov- 
ernment lacks when it comes 
lo education. 

"What we don't have is a 



sense of urgency in the White 
House," Obama said 

When asked about the 
disproportionately high drop- 
out rate for black males in all 
levels of the educational sys- 
tem, Obama said as president 
he intends to talk about the 
importance of parents nur- 
turing children toward pos- 
itive attitudes about educa- 
tion. 

"Particularly African- 
American fathers he said. 
"[They are] all loo often ab- 
sent from the home. And as 
somebody who grew up with 
oul a father, 1 know how im- 
portant that is" 

SUPPORT FOR MILITARY 

Education and minori- 
ties were also discussed with- 
in the context of ROTC pro- 
grams. Moderator Tim Rus- 
sert cited a federal statute 
that says a college or univer- 
sity may lose federal funding 
if it does not provide space 
for military recruiters or pro- 
vide an ROTC program for its 
students. All three candidates 
agreed they would "vigorous- 
ly enforce" the statute. 

Clinton cited her work to 
stop the current administra- 
tion's attempt to take away 
signing bonuses from suldiers 
who get wounded 

Obama said he would 
seek an increase in force 
structure in the US Army 
and Marines to MM strain on 
families who have dealt with 
their loved ones going on 
multiple lours to war zones 

Edwards noted lhat sup- 
porting the military needs to 
be extended to veterans lhat 
have suffered expensive med- 
ical injuries, post- traumatic 
stress disorder and homeless 
MM. 

"They didn't leave us on 
our own. We shouldn't leave 
them on their own," Edwards 
said, noting thai job training 
comprehensive physical and 
mental health and additional 
education should all be avail- 
able to these individuals. 

Debate sponsor CSN 
does not have a permanent 
recruiting station on any of 
its campuses. However, ac- 
cording to interim vice prcsi- 
dent of academic affairs Car- 
los Campo. they regularly get 
requests from the armed forc- 
es to set up boolhs and a I 
ways allow them the room 

Campo said he was 
pleased recruitment was 
brought up because of the 
underlying issue that minor- 
ity students may be taken ad- 
vantage of by military recruit- 
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 9 



Reflection of Pride 




Kansans attack abortion 
through 120-year-old law 



Mant«tri> | COtlBGlAN 
Men'i basketball head coach Frank Martin, explains his role as a sponsor for this year s K State Proud 
Campaign, K-State Proud's motto this year is "Students helping students." 



Mulvane City Council advocates 
proposed casino, though many object 



THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

MULVANE, Kan - The 

city council on Wednesday 
narrowly approved a plan for 
a proposed $500 million casi- 
no resort in Mulvane 

After listening to about 
70 residents on both sides of 
the issue, the council voted 
3-2 to endorse the proposal 
by Harrah's Entertainment- 
Sumner Gaming and Resorts 
to locate a casino near the 
Mulvane exit to the Kansas 
Turnpike 

The vole allows Harrah's 
to submit its proposal to the 
Kansas Lottery for consid- 
eration, competing with two 
Wellington casino plans en- 
dorsed by the Sumner County 
Commission. Those propos- 
als, both near the Wellington 
turnpike exit, were offered by 
Perm National Gaming and 
Marvel Gaming- Binion Fam- 
ily Trust 

MGM Mirage- Foxwoods 
D e v e I u p m e n t - C h i s h o 1 m 
Creek Ventures also has pro- 
posed a $425 million project 
tor the Mulvane exit and is 
seeking annexation from the 
city for a possible endorse- 



ment 

The state's new gambling 
law requires endorsements 
from cities or counties where 
casinos are to be located be- 
fore prospective casino man- 
agers can sign contracts with 
the Kansas Lottery. Harrah's 
was granted annexation by 
the city last week in order 
to try to obtain an endorse- 
ment. 

Harrah's expects to draw 
more than 3 million visitors 
annually and bring in $274 
million in gambling revenue 
by the casino's third year. 

The casino would cover 
70.000 square feet with more 
than 2,000 slot machines and 
50 gaming tables Two ho- 
tels with a total of 275 rooms 
would have separate entranc- 
es so patrons wouldn't have 
to pass through the casino to 
reach them. 

Several hundred peo- 
ple filled the Mulvane High 
School auditorium for 
Wednesday's hearing on Har 
rah's proposal. Speakers were 
about evenly split between 
pro- and anti-casino forces 

Opponents said the casi- 
no would be a bad lit for the 



community, ruin local bust 
nesses and create social prob- 
lems such as crime and gam- 
bling addiction 

"The social impact was 
a lot greater than I feel oth- 
ers were willing to look at," 
said council member Shawn 
Townsun. who voted against 
the plan 

Some urged the council 
to allow residents to vote on 
the issue 

"Lei us vote so lhal you 
can say to all that you were 
doing what the people of 
Mulvane want." said resident 
Karen DeGraaf 

Pro-casino speakers cit 
ed a casino's economic ben 
efils to Mulvane and Sum- 
ner County, including lower 
property taxes, new jobs and 
new business growth. 

Mulvane resident Charles 
Morgan said he and a grow- 
ing number of residents were 
passionate about the propos- 
al to spur economic develop- 
ment 

"When developers see 
a significant investment in 
an area, it's like a held of 
dreams, bringing more in- 
vestment,"' he said. 



IHlASMHlAIH>PkESS 

WICHITA - Religious 
1 1'iiservatives have dusted 
off a largely forgotten 1887 
slate law that allows citizens 
to launch grand jury investi- 
gations, and they are using it 
to help turn Kansas into one 
of the nation's biggest abor 
lion battlegrounds 

A grand jury that was 
impaneled Ian. 8 through a 
citizen petition drive is in 
vestigating Dr George Til 
ler. a Wichita clinic opera- 
tor abhorred by anti-abor- 
tion activists because he is 
one of the nation's few phy- 
sicians who perform late 
lenn abortions. This is the 
second such citizen invest i 
galion of Tiller since 2006 

Phillip |auregui. coun 
sel for the anti -abortion Life 
Legal Defense Foundation, 
said Kansans arc invoking 
the 19th-century law be- 
cause prosecutors are too 
soft on abortion. 

"This is a right the peo- 
ple of Kansas have given 
themselves." he said. 

But others say the law is 
I dangerous tool 

"This is a witch hunt - 
plain and simple." said Vicki 
Saporta, president of the 
National Abortion Federa- 
tion, a pro-choice group. "It 
clearly demonslrales the in- 
herent danger of empower- 
ing biased advocacy groups 
to Impanel a grand jury" 

Normally, prosecutors 
decide whether to convene 
a grand jury to investigate 
something and bring charg- 
es 

I uJer the Kansas law, 
enacted during the Gilded 
Age and (he nation's great 
railroad boom to curb po- 
litical corruption, the peo- 
ple can force an invest ij:u 
tion if they collect signa- 
tures from a certain percent 
age of voters in a county In 
small counties, that can be a 
few hundred signatures; in 
Wichita's Sedgwick County, 
about 4.000 

Five other states pro 
vide for citizen-petitioned 



grand juries: Oklahoma. 
New Mexico, North Dakota. 
Nebraska and Nevada, ac 
cording to a Tiller atlomey. 

One of the most pub 
lieized grand juries con 
vened by citizen petition 
was formed in Oklahoma af- 
ter the 1995 Oklahoma City 
bombing, which killed 168 
people The investigation 
was prompted by suspicions 
thai Timothy McVeigh and 
Terry Nichols had help in 
the bombing But the grand 
liiry found no evidence of a 
wider conspiracy or a gov- 
ernment cover-up. 

So far, no other state ap 
pears to have used the pro- 
cess to pursue a social and 
moral agenda as extensively 
as Kansas, which is attack- 
ing not just abortion, hut 
pornography 

Since 2005. citizen pe 
titions have forced sev- 
eral grand juries in Kan- 
sas to investigate whclh 
er adult bookstores should 
be charged with obscenity 
Twenty stores were indict- 
ed, said Phillip Cosby, ex 
ecutive director of the Na- 
tional Coalition for Protec- 
tion of Children and Fami 
lies. Most of the cases have- 
not been resolved. 

The strategy? "To 
strengthen the prosecu- 
tor's hand" and let authori- 
ties know that "they are not 
alone - that we the people 
feel there is a very big prob- 
lem," Cosby said. 

The anti-abortion move 
ment rediscovered the law 
when David Gittrich used it 
in 2006 to force an invesliga 
Hon into the death of a In 
as woman who had an abor 
tion at Tiller's clinic, though 
the grand jury failed to re- 
turn an indidment, people 
noticed. 

"I was inspired by 
God to use the grand jury," 
Gittrich said. 

This time. Tiller is under 
investigation on suspicion ol 
violating a 1998 state law re 
striding late-term abortions 
He has denied any wrong- 
doing 



Tiller has long been at 
the very tenter of the na- 
tion's abortion battle His 
clinic was bombed in 1985, 
and eight years later, a wom- 
an shot him in both arms 

"We see in Kansas a 
perfect example of a system 
which has virtually become 
active vigilanlism." said Lee 
Thompson, an attorney for 
Tiller, "A very small minor- 
ity number of people who 
have a specific agenda can 
force a criminal investiga- 
tion - and 1 think that is a 
usurpation ol the executive 
power of government" 

Forcing a grand jury in- 
vestigation requires signa- 
tures from 2 percent of the 
nuniber ol people who vot- 
ed in the last governor's 
election in the county, plus 
100 more names In Til- 
ler's county, activists gath 
ered nearly 8.000, or twice 
as many as required. 

Similarly, in December, 
a citizen-impaneled grand 
jury began investigating a 
Planned Parenthood clinic 
in the Kansas City suburb of 
Overland Park 

Then Kansas Attorney 
General Phill Kline hied 
charges against Tiller in 
2006, accusing him of per- 
forming 15 late term abor- 
tions without the required 
medical justification and 
failing to report details to 
stale health authorities But 
a judge threw out the ease in 
a jurisdictional dispute in- 
volving the district attorney 
in Wichita. 

Then in June. Kline's 
successor, Paul Morrison. 
brought new charges against 
Tiller, accusing him of not 
getting the signature of a 
second doctor before per- 
forming late term abortions 

Abortion opponents 
complained that the charg- 
es did not go far enough, 
and took matters into their 
own hands by pressing for a 
grand jury. 

"I am still looking for 
justice." Gittrich said. "1 am 
going to figure some way to 
get justice." 



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PAGE 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



A WINTRY WALK 






Jonathan Knight | i HUH, UN 
A Marian Hall resident walk*, across the snow -coveted tennis courts between Marian and Goodnow Mails toward campus Thursday 
afternoon The first two dayi of classes were met with a snowstorm on Wednesday night. 



Clinton attempts 
to mend black ties 



V 


sudoku 




on the 

QDQQDDQDnn 

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I l!h ASSOCIATED PRESS 

COMPTON, Calif Hil 
lary Rodham Clinton and her 
campaign tried to mend tics to 
black voters Thursday when 
a key supporter apologized to 
her chief rival. Barack Obama, 
tor comments that hinted at 
Obama's drug use as a teen 
ager The candidate herself, 
meanwhile, praised the Rev. 
Martin Luther King and prom 
ised to assist with the rebirth 
of this troubled, largely black 
city. 

Bob Johnson, the founder 
of Black Entertainment Televi- 
sion, apologized for comments 
he made at a Clinton campaign 
rally in South Carolina on Sun- 
day that hinted at Obama s use 
of drugs as a teenager Obama 
is running to be the first black 
president 

Johnson initially denied 
he was talking about Obama's 
drug use. saying he was refer- 
ring to the Illinois senator's 
days as a community organiz- 
er 

Johnson backed away from 
that explanation Thursday, two 
days after Hillary Clinton said 
during a nationally televised 
debate that she considered his 
comments "out of bounds" 

"In my zeal to support 
Senator Clinton. I made some 
very inappropriate remarks for 
which I am truly sorry," John- 
son said in a written statement 



"I hope that you will accept 
this apology. Good luck on the 
campaign trail ." 

Johnson's comments and 
remarks by both Clintons be- 
fore the New Hampshire pri- 
mary last week had alarmed 
several black leaders and drew 
a rebuke from Obama and his 
top aides. 

It began when Hillary 
Clinton gave an interview in 
which she seemed to discount 
King's role in the civil rights 
movement. Later, former Pres- 
ident Clinton cast aspects of 
Obama's candidacy as a "fairy 
tale" 

Obama and Clinton later 
called a truce in the controver- 
sy, and Clinton offered anoth- 
er olive branch Thursday when 
asked whether she would con- 
sider choosing Obama as her 
vice presidential running mate 

"I can't think that far ahead 
because it's bad luck, I'm very 
superstitious, and I don't want 
to be presumptuous," she said 
"But he is an extraordinary 
man and has so much to give 
our country. I hope however 
this works out he will be a ma- 
jor figure in American politics 
for years and years to come" 

lohnson's apology and 
Clinton's visit to Cornpton was 
her latest effort to reconnect 
with the black community af- 
ter she and Obama engaged in 
a bitter exchange of words over 
the issue of race. 



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FRIDAY, JANUARY 18,2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



i'A..i I , 



WORLD NEWS 



BRITISH AIRWAYS JET 
CRASH-LANDS; 19 HURT 

LONDON - A British 
Airways jel from Beijing car- 
rying 152 people crash-land- 
ed Thursday, injuring 19 peo- 
ple and causing more than 
200 flights to be canceled at 
Europe's busiest airport. 

Investigators will speak 
to the pilots and study the 
plane's flight data recorder 
and maintenance records to 
determine what caused the 
crash-landing at Heathrow 
airport, tearing the plane's 
underbelly and damaging its 
wings 

Nothing suggested it was 
terror- related, Scotland Yard 
said 

Fire trucks surrounded 
the Boeing 777 after it landed, 
spraying fire retardant foam 
around the aircraft. Two uf 
the plane's giant wheel units 
were ripped from the crafl 
during the landing and could 
be seen on grass near the run- 
way 

SUICIDE BOMBER TARGETS 
IRAQI SHIITES 

BAGHDAD - A sui- 
cide bomber struck Shiiies as 



worshippers prepared Thurs- 
day fur their most important 
holiday, killing at least 1 1 at 
a mosque in violent Diya 
la province - one day after a 
similar attack by a woman in 
a nearby village. 

Police and eyewitness- 
es said one of the victims had 
intercepted the bomber when 
he saw him making his way 
through the crowd. "Strang- 
er, stranger," he shouted as he 
grabbed the bomber, who in 
stantly detonated the blast 

A spike in bombings in 
recent weeks is chipping away 
at security gains made over 
the past six months, when 
levels of violence dropped na- 
tionwide Many of the attacks 
have targeted Sunn is who 
have turned against the main 
insurgent group, al Qaida, in 
Iraq. 

Authorities fear the Shiite 
religious events - marking the 
death of a 7th century Shiite 
saint - could increasingly fall 
into the crosshairs of Sunni 
extremists. 

ISLAMIC MILITANTS SEIZE 
PAKtSTf 'FORT 

IH hi ISMAIL KHAN. 
Pakistan - In an embarrass- 



ing battlefield defeat for Pak- 
istan's army. Islamic extrem- 
ists attacked and seized a 
small fort near the Afghan 
border, leaving at least 22 sol- 
diers dead or missing 

The insurgents later aban- 
doned the fort and melted 
away into the hills, said mil- 
itary spokesman Maj Gen 
Athar Abbas "There is no 
occupation of the Sararogha 
Fort. Militants have gone 
from there,'' he said 

The militants did not gain 
significant ground, but they 
did further erode confidence 
in the U.S. allied govern- 
ment's ability to control the 
frontier area where the Tali- 
ban and al Qaida flourish 

SELF-DESTRUCTING PALM 
TREE DISCOVERED IN 
MADAGASCAR 

ANTANANARIVO, Mad- 
agascar - A self-destructing 
palm tree that flowers once 
every 100 years and then dies 
has been discovered on the 
Indian Ocean island of Mad 
agascar, botanists said Thurs- 
day 

The name of the giant 
palm and its remarkable life 
cycle will be detailed in a 




study by Kew Gardens scien- 
tists in the Botanical journal 
of the Linnean Society pub- 
lished Thursday. 

"It's spectacular It does 
not flower for maybe 100 
years, and when it's like this, 
it can be mistaken for oth- 
er types of palm," said Mijoro 
Rakotoarinivo, who works for 
the London botanical gardens 
in Madagascar. 

"But then a large shoot, 
a bit like an asparagus, grows 
out of the top of the tree and 
starts to spread. You get some- 
thing that looks a bit like a 
Christmas tree growing out of 
the top of the palm," he said 



The branches of this 
shoot then become covered in 
hundreds of tiny white flow- 
ers that ooze with nectar, at- 
tracting insects and birds 

POLICE STEP UP PRESSURE 
ON KENYAN PROTESTERS 

NAIROBI, Kenya - Po- 
lice cracked down fiercely 
on a second day ol protests 
across Kenya on Thursday, fir- 
ing bullets at opposition sup 
porters and tear gas at a hos- 
pital At least five people were 
killed 

The United States blamed 
President Mwai Kibaki and 



opposition leadi . I 

ga for the violent i!' 

tions and ethnii 

have killed more I ban 

nyans tfnci 

27 presidential ■■ ■ Kih il 

insists he m 

but intern,) i 

observers s;i\ tm • . 

was rigged 

"It is beyond 
them ti> cook 
open those chum, 
municatioii and 
their efforts on trying 
a political i 
State Depanmi ii) spo 
Sean McCornn 

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 18,2008 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 12 



'Wilson's War' one of year's best films 




"Walk Hard: 

The Dewey Cox Story" 
*iFpr** 

Rtvlewi by Srtndin Pneg«t 

After enduring the relentless stupidity of re- 
cent spoof films like "Epic Movie" and "Date 
Movie, I expected "Walk Hard; The Dewey 
Cox Story" to set the bar a little higher 

"Walk Hard" takes aim at recent mu- 
sic bioska like "Walk the Line" and "Ray," by 
following the fictional career of Dewey Cox 
through the past few decades. 

1 1 ili 11 C Re illy plays the title character 
in mi ;ine 14 on, and it's a great performance by 
a tragically underused actor 

Kcilly also performs the bulk of the Rim's 
soundtrack Most of the tunes are catchy, but 
the attempts at punk rock and rap fall flat 

Most of the scenes are ripped directly out 
id Walk the Line." and the novelty wears off 
quickly 

The jokes arc hit and miss, and the ones 
that are funny are beaten to death by the time 
the t Ted its roll 

Listening to Dewey's father say "the wrong 
kid died" is only slightly funny the first time, 
and it's almost painful by the 20th 

As a comedy, "Walk Hard" isn't a com- 
plete waste A constant parade of cameos keeps 
things interesting. 

1 h«.' teem with The Beatles alone will 
ht worth the price of a rental once the DVD 
comes out in a few months 

If "Walk Hard 1 ' would have treated its 
genre with respect rather than ridicule, then it 
could h*w ended up in the pile of great spoof 
films with "Shaun of the Dead" and "Blazing 
Saddles" Instead, it ends up just a notch above 
"Sean Movie." 



"Charlie Wilson's War" 
***** 

Political thrillers can be dangerous 
ground for filmmakers. Too much jargon tan 
bore the audience, and endorsing specif- 
ic policies can run the risk of alienating au- 
dience members with a variety of political 
views. 

In "Charlie Wilson's War." director Mike 
Nichols takes a more comedic approach to 
the world of politics 

Charlie Wilson (Tom Hanks) is a Tex- 
as congressman whose achievements include 
lots of drinking and getting re-elected. 

When the communists invade Afghan- 
istan, he teams up with a CIA. operative 
(Philip Seymour Hoffman) and a Texas mil- 
lionaire i full a Roberts) to conduct a covert 
war 

The plot, based on a true story, pro- 
vides a wonderful playground for writer Aar- 
on Sorkin, who worked on both "The West 
Wing" and "An American President." 

While Roberts' acting seems to lack en- 
thusiasm, Hanks and Hoffman both hit all of 
the right notes. Hoffman deserves to be on 
more of the ye»r-end awards lists. His cyni- 
cal performance is as good as any in his ca- 
reer and provides reason enough to recom 
mend the movie to anyone. 

The pacing is wonderful, and the plot 
shifts focus at the end to reveal several mis 
lakes the United States made when leaving 
Afghanistan. 

It gives the audience something to think 
about while leaving the theater, but it never 
seems forced or out of place. 

"Charlie Wilson's War" is easily one of 
the year's best Catch it while you still can. 



"I Am Legend" 
***** 

"t Am Legend," a mainstream movie 
that relies heavily on special effects, seems 
a bit out of place in theaters at this time 
of year Most big-budget action and horror 
films show up during the summer, but Will 
Smith's latest adventure entertains enough 
to justify its Oscar -season release date 
Smith plays Robert Neville, a mil- 
itary scientist living alone in New York 
City. After a cure for cancer goes bad and 
infects most of the human race, Neville 
works alone to find a cure while evading 
"dark seekers," violent humans infected by 
the virus The plot evolves through several 
flashbacks and unconventional storytelling 
methods Newspaper clippings in aban- 
doned homes help the audience piece to- 
gether the events we never see on-screen 
The scenes of Neville roaming the city are 
impressive The attention to detail, from 
the artwork in Neville's apartment to the 
weeds growing in the streets make it easy 
to immerse yourself in the film's environ- 
ment. 

Unfortunately, the computer- animat- 
ed monsters are less believable Their hu- 
man qualities have been stripped away 
to barely resemble their former selves. 
This might disappoint fans of Richard 
M, 1 1 he son's novel, on which the film is 
loosely based, but 

it keeps the focus on Neville rather than 
his enemies 

Although the ending lacks the power 
of the rest of the story, it's good enough to 
make "I Am Legend" one of the most ex- 
citing movies of the year. 




"Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street" 
***** 



The prospect of a mur- 
derous barber played by |ohn- 
ny Depp was enough to get me 
into the theater, but in the end. 
"Sweeney Todd" fell well short 
of my expectations 

Depp plays Sweeney Todd, 
a barber looking for revenge af- 
ter an evil judge (Alan Rick- 
man) sends him to prison and 
steals his daughter. 

He teams up with Mrs 
Lovett (Helena Bonham Cart 
er) to grind his victims into de- 
licious meat pies. 

Originally based on a 
Broadway musical by Stephen 
Sondheim, the premise seems 
perfect for director Tim Burton. 



"Sweeney Todd" is his sixth film 
with Depp, and every second of 
the film shows off his dark at- 
mosphere and visual wizardry 

Despite wonderful perfor- 
mances, the plot takes a long 
time to get going. The action 
picks up once the killing begins, 
but I felt bored at too many 
points before the end. 

The songs also began to 
grate on my nerves They're 
mostly well done, but I'm usu- 
ally not a fan of musicals, so it 
might be personal taste rath- 
er than quality that turned me 
away I can only recommend 
"Sweeney Todd" to Broadway 
fans with strong stomachs 



Renowned country artist to perform at Longhorns Saloon 



By Eric Davit 
KaJBAJSftTBOOUKlMi 

Country artist Randy 

Rogers usually can be found 
in one of two places; on the 
road or performing a live 
show 

Despite playing more 
than 250 shows last year, 
members of the Randy Kug- 
ers Band found lime to write 
a new album they hope will be 
released sometime this year. 

The group plays at 10 
p.m Friday at Longhorns 
Saloon for its semi-annual 
stop in Manhattan. 

The band is also getting 
ready to record its first al- 
bum away from its home in 
Austin, Tex and it's leader, 
Randy Rogers, recently an- 
swered questions ranging 
Irom his new album to his 
tour location 



lag la Amlla? 

A: We are recording in 
Lafayette, La , to get away 
from all the distractions in 
Austin 

We all live there, and there 
is a lot of things that can dis- 
tract us all. 

We are going to Louisiana 
just to get away from all of 
that 

Q: Has (be ilbum already aeea 
writiea? 

A: We have 15 songs or so 
that we want to cut, and 
we've written about 30 or so 
songs for the record 

Q: What aappeis lo the wag* 
that v*a aea't a* far the re- 
tard? 



next time or pitch them to 
somebody else 

Q: Da yaa write a Ul e( year 



Q: Way areal yaa gays retard- A: We will keep them for 



A We wrote every one that's 
on this record. 

Q: Da yaa write Mags wild aay- 

oat rUt' 

A Our guitar and bass players 
both write, and I typically do 
the majority of the writing 

Q: Waal'* U >our [mo rile ton* 
yea've ever writ tea? 

A: A song called "This Time 
Around" 

QjWfcy? 

A I wrote it with Cody Can- 
ada from Cross Canadian 
Ragweed, and it's kind of a 
pissed off, angry song about 



how somebody screwed you 
over 

I like the emotion that is be- 
hind it 

Q: Da von do I lot with Ira* U 
naaian K»ir»r^tJ '.' 

A: We play several shows with 
them a year, and we're all good 
friends We see them a lot, 

Q: What atari lawn Bofkad? 



over the country the past cou- 
ple of years 

Q: Wkew you're pfckiag plate* lo 
play, how do vow helaare Ifce new 
warawttaHwaU? 

A: About three times a year. I 
guess, we come through Man- 
hattan 

You know, we try to expand 
year after year as much as we 
can 



A We just toured with Jason Q: How i 



Jason and I did a lot of aeous- 
tic shows around Texas, Okla- 
homa and Arkansas 

Q: Wbere da yaa kaar aMMl? 

A: We tour the Midwest and 
the Southeast 

You know, Texas and Oklaho 
ma is where we live but we've 
tried to expand and tour all 



youH tour? 



i loaprr do yoa Ihiak 



A: That's the goal, man. To 
make music, make records and 
tour for the rest of our lives 



ywa 



Q: Is 

wuntm win 
like lo? 



>t< that you 




A: The producer Rick Ru- 
bin. 



ENTERTAINMENT BRIEFS 

MATTHEW MCCON 
AUGHEV TO BE A DAD 

Matthew McConaughey 
and girlfriend Camila Al 
ves are expecting a child, 
the actor an- 
n o u n c e d 
Tuesday on 
his Website. 

"My girl- 
friend Cami 
la and ] made 
a baby to- 
gether," Mc- 
Conaughey McConaughav 
writes "It's 
three months 

growin' in her womb, and 
all looks healthy and live- 
ly so far We are stoked and 
wowed by this miracle of cre- 
ation and this gift from God. 
and so excited for the adven 
ture that will come in rais- 
ing this child, being a mother 
and a father, and shepherd- 
ing him or her through this 
life" 

BRAD RENFROS FORMER 
LAWYER: 'WE ALL FAILED' 

An autopsy is planned for 
Thursday to determine what 
caused troubled actor Brad 
Renfro's untimely death, Los 
Angeles County coroner offi- 
cials said. 

Meanwhile, his former 
lawyer spoke out, saying the 
news left her in tears, 

Former Renfro defense 
attorney Blair Berk, who rou- 
tinely represents celebs bat- 
tling substance abuse (includ- 
ing Lindsay Lohan and Mel 
Gibson), said there's some- 
thing particularly tragic and 
disturbing about the talented 
actor's death at such a young 
age 

"As critical and prescient 
as you become in this town, 
all 1 did was cry when 1 heard 
the news," Berk said "1 feel 
in some respects like we all 
failed." 

BRITNEY SPEARS 
SEEN SHOPPING FOR 
PREGNANCY TEST 

Britney Spears is mak- 
ing more news - with a trip 
to her local drug store. 

The troubled pop star 
and mother of two was pho- 
tographed shopping for a 
pregnancy test Tuesday at a 
local Rite Aid store in Studio 
City, Calif 

Photos show Spears and 
her new beau, 35 -year-old 

Shotographer Adnan Ghat 
>, at the store together, and 
Spears scanning the shelves 
of pregnancy tests. 

The photos were released 
by Ghalib's own photo agen 
cy, FinalPixx. 

All told, it's been anoth- 
er week full of rumors involv- 
ing Spears, who recently lost 
visitation rights with her two 
children. Jayden. 1, and Pres 
ton, 2, after being hospital 

fang, 

As for a report that 
Spears had written a suicide 
note on the night of her melt- 
down, "There was no suicide 
note, and it's completely un 
true that she tried to commit 
suicide," her longtime friend 
Sam l.uili said. "She is not 
suicidal" 

MARION JONES OPENS 

UPTO OPRAH ABOUT HER 
MISTAKES 

In her first interview 
since being sentenced to six 
months in prison for lying 
about her 
steroid use 
and check 
fraud, Mar- 
ion Jones 
accepts re- 
sponsibility 
and said she 
has no re- 
grets 

"1 think 
that I ab- 
solutely should have to ac- 
cept responsibility for break- 
ing the iaw," she says on the 
Oprah Winfrey Show in an 
episode airing Wednesday. 

"I have no regrets for do- 
ing what 1 did on October the 
5th and pleading guilty and 
admitting to the world that 
I lied, that I've made mis- 
takes" 

After her October admis- 
sion, Marion was stripped of 
her Olympic medals - some 
thing much easier to deal 
with than the pain of upset- 
ting her loved ones, she said. 



- PeopU.com 




JONES 



■ ■w *a 



WM 



■M^MMMMM M 



Wmmmmm 



fRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 13 



WOMEN | Wildcats 

hope to knock off 

3rd top-25 opponent 



Continued from P»gt 6 
arc playing mentally 

"1 think the biggest dif- 
ference now. is our team 
mentally is competing in pos- 
sessions very hard and with 
;a purpose and a confidence," 
Patterson said 

K-Slate improved its 
league record Wednesu\i\ 
when they beat Texas Tech 
71-45 ai home to extend its 
winning streak to six games 

The Wildcats will pU 
their third ranked opponent 
of the Big 12 season on Sat 
urday when they face No 25 
Colorado at 7 p.m in Brain - 
lage Coliseum 

The Buflaloet (12-4, 12 
Big 12) lost their last two 
games to Iowa Stale and Tex- 
as A&M. Colorado is led by 



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senior forward lackie McFar- 
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He lure Saturday's game, 
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Senior Forward 
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PAGE 14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 




MARTIN LUTHER Kl NG, JR. WEEK ACTIVITY SCHEDULE 




Monday. Jan. 21: 



8 am. - Prayer breakfast at the Clarion Hotel, 530 Richards Drive 

starting at 10 am. - Musk, a job fair, volunteer opportunities, and more at Manhattan Town tenter 

7:30 p.m ■ Candlelight Vigil and lecture by Ice- 1 at Forum Hall In the K- Stale Student Union 

Tuesday, Jan. 22: 

12:30 p.m. - College of Agriculture's Martin tuther King Jr Diversity Luncheon Lecture, "Making a Positive Difference' by District Magistrate Judge Tommy B. 
Webb ■ at the Cottonwood Room in the Union 

3:30 ■ S p,m. - Reception for recipients of the Commerce Bank Presidential Faculty and Staff Award and the Student Award for Distinguished Servtce to Minority 
Students at the K-State Alumni Center 

Wednesday, Jan. 23: 

1 1:30 a.m. - "February One: The Story of the Greensboro Four/ a documentary film, will be showing in the Union's Grand Ballroom. Tickets are $5 and include 
concessions. 

Thursday, Jan. 24: 

Noon - 5 p.m Bring Forty to Celebrate Dr King" fundraiser for the Coretta Scott King Gardens of Engagement will take place outside the KSDB f M 91.9 radio 
station in the Union. 

3 4:30 p.m. ■ "Strategies fot Diversifying the Faculty" featuring JoAnn Moody, diversity consultant This session is ideal for department heads, search commit- 
tee chairs, diversity committee members, and Faculty Senate leadership - K- State Student Union, Room 206 

Friday, Jan. 25: 

10:30 am. - College of Business Administration Diversity lecture by Kevin Burnett, vice president of sales, Lucent Technologies - Union Forum Hall 
t ':30 p.m. - Patrons of K- State's bust of Dr. King meet to discuss plans for the Coretta Scott King Gardens of Engagement in the Alumni Center. 
3:30 p.m. - Wreath laying ceremony at the commemorative bust outside of Ahearn Field House. Campus and community members are welcome. 



We've got the stories you've got to read. 

The Royal Purple yearbook is available in Kedzie 103 or call 532-6555. 



RCPD | Police plan 

to build extra cells 

to combat crowding 



Continued from Piqel 
last year The current estimate 
ii $15 million to $3 8 million. 
and commissioners said they 
expect the cost to continue to 
rise 

"The law says we have lo 
provide the space, and (they 
are) telling us Ithey) need it." 
said Bob Newsoine, vice chair 
of the Board of County Com- 
missioners 

Local architects Bruce 
McMillan and Dan Rowe arc 
in charge of designing the ad- 
dition, which will solve several 
problems. 

RCPD Captain [eff Hoop- 
er said the new facility will in 
elude 32 beds Ten will serve 
as medical cells, ten will be 
special-needs cells, and twelve 
will function as maximum-se 
curlty cells 

RCPD Director Bradley 
Schoen said one reason the 
jail is running out of room is 
because criminals are not per- 
mitted (o live in cells with oth 
er criminals convicted of dif- 
ferent offenses 

"An inmate has to be clas- 
sified according lo a certain 
criteria when they come in." 
said Schoen "The degree of 



danger they pose to the staff 
and each olher. whether they 
have histories of violence ancL 
the type of offense they com 
milted [are all factors)" 

Hooper explained that the 
maximum -security areas are 
full, so some inmates normal- 
ly kept in a maxim urn -security 
area are in a medium security 
area 

This also affects the medi 
um security prisoners, forcing 
them into an area of minimum 
security 

Rowe said the facility will 
be completed without having 
lo move inmates, which w«< 
one of Hooper's primary eon 
eerns 

Hooper explained to the 
board that the overall popu- 
lation of the jail has exceeded 
the population projected a few 
years ago 

"It's fuller than projections 
supposed they would be in this 
point in its life." Schoen said 
"We're bumping up against the 
number that we can reason- 
ably hold." 

The addition will be vot- 
ed on at a Law Enforcement 
Agency meeting at noon on 
Tuesday in City Hall 



This l :nlli'tiian U availuM. -it 

1 12 locations near you. C on u.iw 



Spring JBar ctaftfe 2##S 




N. Manhattan Ave 
537-7151 



Monday 
$1" off 

all drinks, btl's, frozens, 

martinis, shots, draws, 

$r : ' Monster Bomb 

open @ 4pm 



Tuesday 



'/;■ Price Martinis 
l" Any Pints & Wells 



^Dom. Bottles open@4pm 



Wednesday 

*2 M All Frozen Drinks 

*2" Domestic Big Beers/We I Is/Bottles/Shots 

25e Wings 4pm-9pm 

Open at 4pm 



Thursday 



*3°° Energy Bombs 

*3 W Red Bull and Vodka 

l l"Any Pint 

•2" Import Bottles& Micros 

50e Hard and Soft Tacos 

Any Sandwich $3' v llam-2pm 

Open at Ham 



Friday 

3.00 Boulevard Pints 

'3°° Any Sandwich llam-2pm 

'2.00 Enchilada Plates 

Open at 11 am 



Saturday 



l 3<* UV Vodka Drinks 
*3°° Blue Moon & Killians Pints 



Open @ Ham 



Sunday 

'1 'Wells and Domestic Draws 
Open @ 7pm 



IPS?? 

1204 Moro *» 537 8910 

bALbA & MARGARITA BAR 




Monday 

$1.75 Wells 

$1.75 Any Pints 

$3.00 Red Bull & Vodkas 

$3.00 Energy Bombs 

$10 Mega Margaritas 

1/2 Price Tequila Shots 

Free Salsa 4-9 



Tuesday 

1/2 Price Margaritas 

$2 Import Bottles 

1/2 Price Salsas 

$2.50 Domestic Pitchers 



Wednesday , 

$2 U Call it 

Margarita*. Btrli.. Pn?m„ Calk. WdLs 
$3 Energy Bombs 
$1 Off All Salsas 



AGGIE 

LOUNGE 

712 12th St. 
537-8585 



Monday 

$3.00 Domestic Pitchers 

$1.75 Wells 

Open @7 



Tuesday 

$1.00 Mugs 

$1.75 Wells 

Open Q 7 



Thursday 
Party Pic Night 

Come be a part of AggieviWe history by 

getting you and your friends party 

pictures posted on our walls. 

10-Midnight Spon sored by B u dwei se r: 

S2 oo Bottles 

(Bud, Bud Light, Bud Select) 

$1.75 Bud Light Pints 

1/2 Prire Margaritas 

$2 Imports and Micros 

1/2 Price Salsas 



Sunday 

$1 off Any Drinks 

$3.50 Fishbowls 

$1.50 Monster Bombs 



Wednesday 

$2.00 you call it 

(premiums, bottles, 

wells, calls, shots) 

$3.00 Red Bull & 

Vodkas 

Energy Bombs 

Open Q 3 



Thursday 

$1 ,75 Domestic Bottles 

$1.75 Wells 

Open @ 3 



Friday 

$1 ,75 Cans 
Open @ 3 



Saturday 

$1.75 Cans 
Open @ 3 



'/ 







1210 Moro 
M7-0775 



MONDAY 

$2.00 Boulevards, 

Blue Moon, Killian's Pints 

$1.75 Wells 

$3.00 Fishbowls 



TUESDAY 

$2.00 All Drinks, Premiums, 

Calls, Draws, Shots 

$3.50 Belfast & Energy Bombs 

FREE POOL 



WEDNESDAY 

$1.75 Wells and Domestic Draws 
$2.00 Shots and Calls 



THURSDAY 

$2.00 Boulevards, Blue 

Moon, Killian's Pints 

$2.00 Domestic Bottles 

$1.75 Domestic Draws 



SUNDAY 

$1.75 Domestic Pints 

$1.75 Wells 

$3.50 Belfast& 180° Bombs 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 



CLASSIFIED ADS 

LET THEM WORK FOR YOU 

Kansas State collegian 

103 Kedzie • 785-532-6555 



JIMMY JOHN'S 

Gourmet Sub Sandwich Shop 
Now hiring crew members and 
drivers. Flexible scheduling, 
free/discounted meals, 
great pay, and a fun 
work environment. 
Apply in person 
today at 1212 Moro 





1 -4 bedruoms 



DIAMC0ND G Ssaff" 



H * Ii ( r S I A I t 



▼ 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 

785-532-6555 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2008 



II I I _L || II I I 

i' r :: ■■ _il> is l« -j : 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE IS 





■ J I ■ I 



LET'S RENT 



J 

Rent-Apt Unfurnished 



LARGE. ONE-BED- 

ROOM, nan tii campus 
Very nice, recenlly up- 
dated with ample parking 
No pats Available irnmedi 
slofy 786-537-7050. 



Rent-Duplexes 



MCE DUPLEX «M Val- 
uer, four -bedroom, two 
balh. all appliance*, 
washer/ dryer. August 1 
Si. 080' month 785 293 
5197 



Vr'Jf Motse 



Advertise.- 

: LM'UwIFILK'ttaS.twi) 



AVAILABLE JUNE: One 
three, tour and five-bed 
room houses Close to 
campua Reserve now tor 
bad selection 785-539 
3672 Local landlord 

NEXT TO campua Avail 
able now. June and Au- 
gust One. two, three 
tour live, Bin, and nine 
bedrooms Apartments, 
houses . and multiple ibs 
No pets 715.537-7050. 



Rent -Homes 



NICE BRITTNAY Ridge 
Townhome, Tour-bed- 
room, two and 1/2 bam, 
all applianoas, washer/ 
dryet August 1. No pen 
$900/ month. 785 -293- 
5197 

THREE. FOUR, S3 ftve- 
bedrooms Didnl get the 
house you wanted laal 
year'' The good ones go 
last Can 7SS-341-OS8* ' 




Bulletin Board I Housing/ Real Estate 



ROOMMATE NEEDED 
Ntoe. spacious Ihree -bed 
room house 5350/ month 
plus txlts Avaaabte imme- 
diately Call 620-654-7696 




LEARN TO FLY' K-State 
Frying Club has live air- 
planes and lowest rates 
Call 765-776-1744, www 
ksu edu/ksfc. 

ROOM FOR R.H-! Llnivw- 

sity Garden* Two-bed - 
room/ two balh Share 
with male grad student 
Reni is $280 plus utattaa. 
Contact ma at marychnsli 
nesandnensf yahoo com 
or 913-620-0579. 



MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4614 as auras ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity In housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count of race, sex. famil- 
ial atatua, military sta- 
tue, disability, religion, 
age color national ori- 
gin or ancestry Viola- 
lions should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resource* at 
City Hall. 785-587 2440 




FOUND A gold nng by the 
International Student Cen- 
ter Oh Tuesday, Dec. 
nth. Must describe r|i 
Please email me at 
ier4888wksu edu 

WOMENS CLASS Finn, lo- 
caled m Aggieville New 
Years Eve. Call lo iden- 
rfy 795-537-6643 




Em ployment/Caneers 




ADMISSIONS REPRE- 
SENTATIVE: Kansas 
State University ia recruit- 
ing for al least one and 
poa aibly several posltlona 
ol AdmlaeJona Repreeen- 
tatlve. Tlvaae individuals 
are responsible for the de- 
veto pmen I an d I mplemen 
talion of an effective stu- 
dent recruitment program 
within a apeciflc geo- 
graphic region. The m»|of 



MANHATTAN CrTY Ordi- 
nance 4514 assure* ev- 
ery peraon equal oppor- 
tunity In housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count of race, sex, famil- 
ial statue, military ata- 
tua, disability, religion 
age. color, national ori- 
gin or ancestry. Viola- 
tions ahould be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resource* at 
City Hall. 7B5-M7-2440. 

A VERY nice one-bed- 
room. Close to campus 
and Aggieville New paint . 
carpel and appliance* 
Available now 1 No pets 
785-336-1124 

APPLY ONLINE 1 One to 
four-bedroom apartments, 
studios and lofts available 
January or August 2006 
Visit us at housing k -state 
edu or call 7B5-S32-3790 
to set up a tour 



Rent Houses 



AVAILABLE NEXT school 
year Three to eight-bed 
room houses AH have full 
kitchen, wasner/ dryer, 
central air Call now for 
best selection www lore- 
moatproperty.com 785- 

LTRgT- — RSuTTBetJ 

ROOM two bathroom, car- 
peted rec room. Near Ag- 
gieville/ campus, central 
air. washer/ dryer, dta- 
posal, fireplace, garage 
Available now, lease 
terms negotiable (785)- 

-317 5488 

ME TWO mine, lour, 
live, and sin -bedroom 
apartments and houses 
available tor June and Au- 
gust 785-539-929* 




■COMPLETE LIST ol 
houses close to campus 
tor sale larrylimbock- 
er'iireecaandnichols com 
785-31 7-7713 Comer- 
stone Realty 

5nT TWO three, and 
tour-bedroom houses 

Close lo campus' also 
westside. Avails Jie imme- 
diately No pets 785-539- 
1975 or 785-313-8296 

TilRFE FOUrVBED- 

ROOM, updated bnett 
ranch home Neat to KSU 
Stadium. $137,000 Cad 
785 539*751 



MALE OR tomato to rent 
one or two -bedroom* Hi ■ 
nice four-bedfoom. two 
bathroom apartment Five 
minute walk Irom campus 
on College Heights Rd 
$290/ month all included 
Available January 15 
Email b3007'#ksu edu 
785-31 7-8291 . 

MALE ROOMMATE 

wanted House three 
blocks Irom campus 
5325 00 plus one-fourth ol 
utilities Call 620-228- 
1345 

NEED ONE clean tomato 
roommate three-bedroom 
apartment 1225 Ratone, 
across street Irom cam 
pus $270; month plus utili- 
ties. No smoking^ pets 
785-840-8094 or 620-492 
3191 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
tour-bedroom, two bath 
apartment 1023 Col- 
orado. All appliances fur- 
nished 5275 plus utilities 
620-845-2498. 

THREE FEMALE interna 
tionei graduate students 
looking tor roommate al 
University Crossing www ■ 
ucmanhattan.com. Call 
712-261-7877 or e-mail 
nippmeaaaaelBnial.com. 




FOUR-BEDROOM 


APARTMENT 


at 1521 


Leavenworth 


$900, bUls 


paid CaM 785 539-8401 




Coordinating strategy and 
reeou rce people for the re- 
gion; serving as the pri- 
mary recruitment repre- 
sentative developing and 
maintaining service rela- 
tlonahlpa with high 
schools and community 
colleges: attending major 
community 
events, and co- 

ordinating effort i for I he 
region with K- Stale lac u try 
and elan. Qualification a In- 
clude a recent K-State 
bachelor'* degree; lamil 
iar ity a nd e> cltemenl lor K* 
State: demonstrated aca- 
demic success and Stu- 
dent Involvement/ leader- 
ship skills in student 
groups and organized liv- 
ing; strong com- 
m u n i c a I I o n 
j k 1 1 1 s. i oral/written) .strong 
eocial aklllifotavarletyof 
situation*: ability to work 
independently; overall 
high energy level and en- 
thusiasm: wllllngnet* to 
travel extensively: and a 
valid driver's license At 
least one successful can- 
didate ahould have n alive 
or near-r,ativ* Spanish 
I a n guage p roi 1 c len cy. One 
adml salons rep 

r e a e n t a I I v e 
will be located in Dallas 
Teiaa, and repreeent the 
university In the state of 
Teias. Applicants wanting 
10 be considered for the 
Texas admiastons repre- 
sentative position should 
indicate so In their Inter ol 
application. Position will 
start July 1. 2008. and 
pay 530.SOO tor twelve 
months Candidaleshould 
send a letter of applica- 
tion, resume, 
tranecrtptle), 
and the name* and phone 
number* of three refer- 
ences to: Search Commit- 
tee. New Student Set 
vice*, Kansas Stale Uni- 
versity, 122 Anderson 
Hall Manhattan. KS 



ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartments in new build 
Inge. Close to campus 
and Aggieville. Available 
June and August 2008 
No pets Call John at 7B5- 
313-7473 

ONE-BEDROOM COZY 
apartment, one block from 
campus $500/ month, in- 
cludes utilities Call 785- 
770-0491 



AVAILABLE FEBRUARY 
1 Four-bedroom, two 
bathroom, 1300 square 
feet in RedBud Estates 
Neit to pool $800/ month 
plus deposit. 785-304- 
0137. 




THREE BEDROOM 


APARTMENT al 930 


Os- 


age $750. bias paid 


Call 


785 539-840 1 





NOW LEASING 
FOR FALL 



Large 2 Bedroom Apts. 

Cambridge Square 

Sandstone 

Petjblebtook 



>;-■ SM Mi 10 I 

537-9064 

*w* MMmMjirH'fiMI i am 



FOR SALE 1995 Liberty 
mobile home 18»7B, two- 
bedroom, two bath wrlh 
shad $15,000 785-494 
B484 Five miles east of 
Manhattan in nice park 

FOR SALE Beaulilul two 
bedroom one bath, 14m 
65 mobile home, two car 
carport. partially fur 
n i shed, garden tub. all ap- 
pliances, large shed and 
deck Poeejble owner fi- 
nancing $10,500 Walnut 
Grove (7851-565-2483 

WALNUT QROVE 2005 
Clayton Mobile Home 
Three-bedroom, two teeth 
All appliances, shed, and 
Jock 785313-4560 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted as soon as possi- 
ble i Of* block from cam- 
pus 1 You will have your 
own bedroom and own full 
bathroom' With washer < 
dryer dishwasher, and 
fireplace Water and trash 
pato fori If interested call 
Camt at 785-747-8742 or 
emest me c2)»ksu edu 

ONE ROOM in a throe- 
bedroom apartment Avail- 
able February 1 Room- 
mates are great Across 
from campus 1225 Ra- 
tone 5265/ month Call 
T85-294-0567 

SUBLEASE THROUGH 
May or August, 5315/ 
month plus utikties 
Washer and dryer, close 
to Agglevisa Call 785-820- 
0512 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
lor a two- bedroom apart- 
ment weal ol campus 
Ren! $337 50' month plus 
utilities Please call 402- 
817-5678 Room available 
immediately 

WANTED SOMEONE to 
take over my tease One- 
bedroom $420, Park 
Place Apartments Nerd to 
Pizza Hut Call Sue 785- 
375-8011 




Service Directory 



• 3000 Collage Ms* 
•1114 




Roommate Wanted 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted lo share house 
win female and male 
$300 month Utilities 
paid. Call 785-537-4947 



HOME CHILDCARE 

wanted for 2. b and 7 year 
old. Onvable and reliable 
car needed References 
required Contact Lindsay 
al 786-317-2140 or 
Iknurse 79'J*gmaH com tor 
more Information 




Employnwiiei C jret-t «. 




THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential ol advertise- 
ments In the Employ 
menu 1 Career i la aaif (ca- 
tion. Readers are ed- 
lo approach any 
such 
nrfy with 
Hon. The Collegian 
urge* our reader ! to 
contact the Better Bus! 
ne*s Bureau. 501 SE Jet 
f arson. Topeks. KS 
66607.1190. 715-232- 
0454 

FARM WORKER Canto, 
gram operation Expen- 
ence Call 765-456-3090 
or 785-456-7215 attar 7p - 
rtv 

A WELL established, pro- 
fessional landscaping 
company la seeking a reli- 
able individual lor lull time 
employment m their land- 
scape installation division 
Prior landscape or farm 
experience preferred 
Above average wages 
commensurate with expe- 
rience and ability Benefits 
include major medical 
paid leave and 401 k Ap- 
ply In person al 11524 
Landscape Ln St 
George. KS 66535 785- 
494-2418 or 785-776- 
0397 

ACCOUNTANT CFO 

Due to our continued 
growth, CMcPtua, the na- 
tion's leading provider of 
City. County, and School 
websites, has an opening 
tor a full-time accountant. 
This career position re- 
quires the ability to handle 
multiple tasks and prion 
lies while maintaining a 
positive and energetic am- 
lude. Accounting experi- 
ence is required. 
Peachtree experience pre- 
ferred Compel itive pay 
plus benefits including 
Hearth. Dental, Paid Holi- 
days. Paid Vacation and 
40 IK Email resume >n Mi 
crosoft Word or Text tor- 
mai to 
jobs <& civicplu scorn 

ACCOUNTING CLERK 
pan-time with USD 383 
Business Office $7 00 per 
hour. Twenty hours per 
week during school year, 
full-time summer hours 
High school graduate or 
equivalent, computer 

skills including experience 
with Excel, working knowl- 
edge of office procedures 
and equipment, basic ac- 
counting skills Job de- 
scription available Apple 
cations accepted until po- 
sition is filled Apply lo 
Manhattan- Ogden USD 
383. 2031 Poyntr Ave. 
Manhattan. KS 66502 
785-587-2000 Equal Op- 
portunity Employer 

APPOINTMENT SET* 

TER; CivicPlus is the na- 
tions leading provider ol 
City, County and School 
websites We have tun 
and part-lime positions in 
Manhattan with significant 
income potential tor the 
right individual This posi- 
tion involves calling poten- 
tial clients lo setup webt- 
nar appointments Pay is 
$10/ hour plus 540 lor 
each webinar appoint- 
ment you setup Full- lime 
benefits Include Health 
Dental. Paid Holidays, 
Paid Vacation and 401 K 
matching Email resume 
in Microsoft Word of Text 
lormat lo 
)obs<a civicplus com 

ASSISTANT TENNIS 

COACH, Eisenhower Mid- 
dle School Salary set by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spring season Accepting 
resumes Or letters with 
qua! illations umil position 
Is filled Apply lo Manhat- 
tan Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poynu Ave, Manhat- 
tan. KS 66502 7B5 : 587- 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 

BABYSITTERS NEEDED 
CuilegeSitler com con- 
nects Kansas State stu- 
dent babysitters with Man- 
hattan area families Stu- 
dents, please visit CoHaga- 
S liter com and create 
your tree profile 

9ARTFNDINGI 5300 A 
day potential No expan- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 1 800-965 
6520 ext 144 



BILLING COORDINA- 
TOR. Due lo our contfn 
ued growth CivicPlus. the 
nation's leading provider 
of City, County, and 
School websites, has an 
opening lor a lull time 
Billing Coordinator This 
exciting opportunity re- 
quires the ability to handle 
multiple tasks and pnon 
ties while maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Competitive pay 
plus benefits including 
Health. Denial. Paid Holi- 
days. Paid Vacation and 
40 tK Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or Text for- 
mat to 
tobsyicrvicpkjs com 

CHIPOTLE-WORK at a 
place where you actually 
wan I to eat the loodl 
Chipott* is now hlnng all 
position* Free food, flexi- 
ble hours. Apply 1 p.m. to 
5 p.m . Monday through 
Friday 785-567-8029 
COMPUTER PROGRAM- 



HrTiVM -MIR 



( -555 



Knowtodge m% 



MERS wanted tor posi- 
tions In the 
Discovery in 
Research group at K- 
Slate Applicants should 
ob responsible, diligent 
and ere alive and should 
be laminar wiih Cf or 
Java, or have the ability to 
loam Pay Is common su 
rale with experience; all 
grades are encouraged to 
apply Call 785-341-1599 
or send resume to bhSu'fl'- 

eisJau.edu, 

DER8V DINING Center 
Openings in sanitation 
and food production de- 
partments Starting al 
58 75/ hour Flexible 
noun. Apply at Derby 1 29 

FULL-ME M pan- 
lime Porter needed Must 
have valid dnver a license 
and clean driving record 
Sae Eddie al Schram 
Chrysler Dodge 3100 An- 
derson 

FULL-TIME CLERK posi- 
tions available Motorcy- 
cling background s plus. 
WHI tram Apply in parson 
al Brooks Yamaha. 8070 
East Highway 24. Manhat- 
tan. KS 

GRAPHIC DESIGN: Civic- 
Plus, a Manhattan based 
company and the leader 
in government websites. 
is seeking lull- time and 
contract graphic design- 
ers No HTML experience 
is necessary but must be 
proficient in Photoshop 
An understanding ol 
Flash. Adobe Illustrator, 
and Microsoft Word is 
helpful but not required 
Must bo abltj to manage 
mufllplo protects simulta- 
neously m a fast-paced 
environment Full-time 

benelils include health, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 Ik) 
matching Email resume 
and design samples lo 
tooaAcrvtcplus com 

GREAT JOB tor Out- 
doors y People! Kaw Val- 
ley Greenhouses Is look- 
ing for help this growing 
season We are interested 
in part or lull-lime sched- 
ules lor the second 
semester For more inlor- 
mation contact human re- 
sources at kvgemploymen- 
IWyahoocom or 776- 
8585 To apply In person 
go to 360 Zeandale Rd. 
Manhattan. Monday- Fn- 
dey Ba m 4p m 

HEAD TENNIS COACH, 

Eisenhower Middle 

School Salary sel by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spnng season Accepting 
resume* or letters with 
qualifications until position 
I* tilled Apply to Manhat- 
tan -Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poyntz Ave. Mann at 
tan. KS 86502 785587- 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



HELP WANTED: KSU 
BEEF CATTLE BE 
SEAflCH CENTER 
CONTACT: Garrett at 
gparsonssrlusu edu or 
785539-4971 

fioflTlcULTlJRAL sEfV 

VICES Garden Center is 
seeking reliable, molt 
vatad irvJrvVJuais lor ful- 
time and part-ttma sea 
sons! positions in our re- 
lail store Above average 
wages commensurate 
wiih experience and abili- 
ties Apply In parson at 
11524 Landscape Ln , St 
George, KS 86S36 785- 
494 2418 or 785-778 
0397 

HORTICULTURAL IW- 
VICES Is seeking reliable 
hardworking individuals 
tor luK-Ume and part-time 
seasonal staff In our pro- 
duction greenhouse Ap- 
ply In person at 11524 
Landscape Ln . St 
George. KS 86536 785 
«94241B or 785-778- 
0367 



SECRET ART/ RE CEP 
T10NIST W*a organized, 
energelic person tor lull 
time position wfth busy 
non-profit agency Re- 
quires outstanding tele- 
phone and office sMIa 
top notch communication 
abulias and pleasant "can 
do" aftilude two year* of 
Ace experience. profi- 
ciency in MKroaoft Word 
and Excel required Send 
cover letter, resume and 
three references by Jan- 
uary 24 lo Screening 
CommltW North Cemrai- 
Flmt Hills Area Agency on 
Agmg. 401 Houslon 
Streel. Manhattan. KS 
66502 Equal Opportunity/ 
Affirmative Action Em- 
ployer 

SERVICE COORDWA- 
TOR: Networks Plus has 
an opening in our Manhat- 
tan headquarter* office for 
a full -time Service Coordi- 
nator This chaaangirifl po- 
sition entails taking ous 



sre a buamaee 
major looking lor a great li- 
nancial opportunity, try 
working tor the third 
fsstast growing company 
in the nebon We wlH train 
you Call 785-342-2819 or 
email hous*of)ob* hot- 
mall com tor a buames* 
opportunity packet 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 
and Landscape Forman 
needed Competitive pay 
and benelils Please con- 
lad Athens Services In- 
c of Topeka. KS 785-232- 
1558 or www.athansser- 
vice* com 

MECHANICALLY ~ 

CLIN ED student lo do 
apartmeni and upkeep, 
beginning immediately 
Flexible hours Variety ol 
work carpentry, electrical, 
plumbing . painting yard 
work, and general mainte- 
nance Send tetter and re- 
sume c/o Student PuNica 
ttons. Box 300, Manhattan 
i,, '.hi, 

MOUNTAIN DEW repre- 
aentatlvea needed Be a 
leader ihla spring! Get 
paid lo promote a brand 
you love while gaining 
reel world experience 
Only two posltlona are 
available. Go to www- 
repnation.com/dewcrciw 
l oepptyl 

NEED SOMEONE In help 
clean my house, Sixteen 
hours'' week Call Rhonda 
al 785-537 7978 lot inter- 
view 

NOW HIRING. Subway 
Work up lo twenty hours a 
week, meal* provided 
Day. night, and wee A aod 



around schedule. Pick up 
application at any Sub- 
way, including the Student 
Union. 

PROJECT MANAGER 
CivkPius has an opening 
In our Manhattan head- 
quarters office tor a full- 
lime Project Manager 
This challenging position 
antais managing multiple 
website redesign protects 
trom start to Imish Posi- 
tion requires attention to 
detail, (he ability to man- 
age multiple tasks, priori- 
ties and deadlines, and a 
cheerful altitude Training 
Is provided Benefits in- 
clude Health. Dental. Paid 
Holidays. Paid Vacation 
and 40 IK malchmg 
Email resume in text or 
Word formal to 
jobs® civicplu* com 



■THIS UTTLbT*- 

SPACE COULD 

BR HOLDING 

.YOUR NEW CAJU. 



*i*t> *n ad in th« 

crUMirixlil 
7S15.5J2.4S55 




Ai.i.MiinvmiS. 



ABOVE AVERAGE COMPENSATION 

• Discounted Meals 

• Flexible Schedule 

• Crew Incentive Programs 

• Medical Insurance 

• Retirement Plan 



APPLY TODAY • WORK TODAY 



ill: 

IMGoiHlTiXKi Place 

3(K)h Anderson Ave. 

lit >!-: Prut: Free Workplace 



McCULLOUGH DEVELOPMENT 



line la January 25. 2008 
Kan sas Stale Un lve> any I s 
an Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer and actively seek* 
diversity among Its em- 
ployees. Paid tor by 
Kansas Stale University. 




t ,ill«al«n AdtrriiMn* 

I I - hvAttr 
- h '. <i r i i«in 



Assistant Operations Manager 



1 



Skip 

the \ 
stress.! 



^-♦ve^f tifyti-i ve&&€s 



785.776.3804 • www.mdiproperties.com 



Graduating in May in Business 
or Operations Management? 

This position might be just what you're looking tor. Start part- 
time this spring and become full-time upon graduation. 
Cushion Seats, Inc is a fast growing local company offering 
seating services to some of the largest Football Stadiums in 
the country. Position requires strong analytical skills, attention 
to detail, great communication skills and a drive for success. If 
you enjoy sports and a fast paced environment, this job is for 
you. Check us out online at www.seatbacks.com Pay is S25K- 
S35K based on experience. 



Please send resume to: 



Cushions Seats, Inc 
Attn: Kara Gonzales 
520 McCall Road 
Manhattan, KS 66502 



(ClBlilul! 



protects, and scheduling 
technicians Poaibon re- 
quires alteniion to detail 
the ability lo manage multi- 
pie tasks, priorities, dead 
lines, and a cheerful alti- 
tude. Training is provided 
Hours are 7 30am to 5p ■ 
nv Monday through Fn- 
day Salary plus Health. 
Denial. Paid Holidays. 
Paid Vacation, and 401 (k) 
matching. E-mail resume 
in text or Word formal to 
jobsS networfcapkis com 

STEEL B PIPE Supply 
Company- Inventory Ana- 
lyst Assistant There is an 
immediate opening lor an 
Inventory analyst assis- 
tant at our corporate of- 
Roe. Position is responsi- 
ble for creating migration 
materials, analyzing and 
monitoring SAP software 
processes and assisting 
m analysis ol warehouse 
cycle counting data Also 
support for customer ser- 
vice and sales staff Quail 
fled candidates win have 
basic math and account- 
ing. Work experience in in- 
ventory comioi a phis 
Two years coUegu educa- 
tion prelerred Interested 
applicants should submit 
resume lo Steel & Pipe 
Supply, Inv Analyst As- 
sist . PO Box 168B. Man- 
hattan. KS 86505 Equal 
Opportunity Employer 
STUDENT PUBLICA- 

TIONS Inc has a part 
time position lor a Mac in 
tosh technician available 
Ihe tech support learn 
maintains about 50 Macin- 
tosh workstations, provid- 
ing software support as 
wet as performing gen- 
eral hardware mainte- 
nance Any expenence 
with Mac OSX, design 
software such as Adobe 
Photoshop. Adobe InDe- 
stgn. and networking is 
helpful but not required 
Pay starts al So SO per 
hour with the opportunity 
to advance Musi be a full- 
time student al KSU Ap- 
plications may be picked 
up In 113 Kedzte or online 
al Mtp /.itrww kstatecolle- 
gian.com/spub/ Down 
toad the second applica- 
tion at this Hnk. Applies 
tion deadline Is S p m Fri- 
day. February IS, 2008 
Please include your 
spnng 2008 class sched 
M 



STUDENT TECHNICIAN 
position opening S7 00/ 
hour Hours required 
Twenty hours/ weak when 
class is m session, kwly 
hour*/ week during turn- 
mer and breaks Job de- 
scription: Pickup and dettv- 
ery ol compulers printers, 
etc lb various campus lo- 
cations I valid dnver* li- 
cense required), general 
PC and printer matnla 
nance and repair, general 
inventory and accounting 
luncliona Preferred quaUfi- 
canons 1st or 2nd year 
student in computer, elec- 
tronics, or relaleel major, 
applicants with demon- 
strated mechanical apti- 
tude, computer mamte 
nance experience helpful 
How lo apply Interested 
appkcanis should come in 
parson to 12 1 Easl Sta 
dium lo I ill out an applica- 
tion Please corned An 
Ihony Phillips at Anlho 
ny#kauedu with any 
questions aboul the post 
lion 

TECHNifAi 

position available tor K- 
atate undergraduate stu- 
dent with a variety ol 
skills Must have good in- 
terpersonal and problem 
solving skills Experience 
with PC s and popular soft- 
ware applications such as 
Word Perfect, MS Word 
MS Excel. MS Internet E< 
ptorer. Internet applies 
lions, basic web page edit- 
ing and Windows appMca- 
ttons desired Must have a 
technical understanding ol 
Microsoft Windows Sum- 
mer availability neces- 
sary Computer Network 
experience preferred Ap- 
plications me si be submit- 
ted at Department ot Com- 
munications IET. 211 Urn 
burger Hall, 785-532 
5270 Applications win be 
available/ accepted unit I 
January 25. 2008 Please 
attach rusume with the ap 
paeallon^^^^^^^ 

WILDCATSN6SPJOBS - 
COM PAID survey laker, 
needed in Manhattan 
100S free to pm Click on 
surveys 

WORK AT home book 
keeping and sales repre- 
sentative You cav work 
at home and eari up lo 
$3000 S4000 monthly 
Contact it interested E- 
maU' Igboolam J'nopi net 




GROWING COMPANY 
seeking motivated K- 
Stater's who wish to earn 
money fast working pari 
lime online from home 
www lavidarica abunis - 
com 




Open Market 




COMPUTER WINDOWS 
Business. Inlernet and En 
tertammeril CD-ROMS lor 
Sato at Discounted 
Prices 1 Visit www las- 
landeasy com walker. 



(?G* 



m r 




Found S om et hin g! 



i 




Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



sudolku 

Fill in the grid so thai every row, 

every column, and every 3 x 3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repe.it I. 



5 

1 
3 4 


6 


2 
5 
7 8 


3 

6 
8 


7 1 
6 4 


4 
9 
2 


8 5 
9 

1 


5 


6 7 
1 

9 



Solution ami tips 
at www.sudokuxom 



"Rtitl Hnft, Rail Help. Real Option* " 

t'rw |i[ivii.tii. i ic<4irii> 

I "l.i II i i niilii1ciili.il srnk'i' 

Saw dnv results • < .ill for appuintiiMil 

l'H.,i.J ,, !:■■. imtn , jinpvi is *,f4kni!n Vilbpr 
\1"i, In l i .i in. -5 p.m 



■rMfl 



sfJal 



PAGE 16 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2O0S 



.!• 



»„ 



■ 



Saturday, January 19 

3pm - Bramlage Coliseum 

Bring this paper with you! 



Marchi 



WILDCAT WEEKEND 

Men vs Texas A&M @ 3pm 
Women vs Colorado @ 7pm 

Cobras during halftime of both games! 



Women's game only $3 with your men's ticket, 
or FREE with your K-State student I.D. 



Van * * * 



^mmmmmmmm 



y^y KANSAS STATE 

Collegian 



www.btitKolkgiani.om 



Local man 

charged 

with drug 

possession 



By Sarah Burford 
KANSAS STATE COIXElilAN 

A man was charged with 
felony possession and sale of 
marijuana after Riley County 
Police found and confiscated 
the drug from his apartment. 

Marwin Lee Hudge, 21, 
was arrested on fan 18 after 
police searched his apartment 
at 1412 Beech wood Terrace. 
Apt 8. in Manhattan This 
search warrant was the result 
of an ongoing investigation of 
marijuana distribution in the 
Manhattan area, according to 
a Riley County police report. 

Hudge is charged with 
two counts of selling marijua- 
na, felony possession of mart 
juana. two counts of unlawful 
acquisition of drug proceeds. 
the unlawful use of a tele- 
communication device, and is 
charged for not having a Kan- 
sas drug tax stamp, according 
to the police report. 

Hudge's bond is set at 
J 15,000 



Employee 
steals $6000 
from Sears 



By Sarah Burford 

KANSAS STATF COLLEGIAN 

A former Sears employee 
was charged )an 17 with steal- 
ing $6,165 worth of merchan- 
dise from the Scars store in 
the Manhattan Town Center, 
according to Lt. Kurt Moldrup 
uf the Riley County Police De- 
partment 

Eric Batchman allegedly 
stole miscellaneous household 
goods, electronic equipment 
and power and hand tools 
from Sears over a period of 
about four and a half months 
- from Aug 4, 2007 to Jan 17, 
2008, Moldrup said 

Batchman allegedly stole 
items directly from the store 
and also made false refunds to 
put money on gift cards, which 
he then used to buy items from 
the store. Moldrup said. 

He said the RCPD was 
able to recover most of the 
stolen items from Batchman's 
home 



$1.8 million 

grant funds 

pathogen 

research 



By Adrianne OeWeese 
KANSAS STA IH OIl.HJIAK 

A lick -borne bacteria that 
gamers a wide biological ap- 
plication has brought more 
than $1.8 million in federal re- 
search funding to K-State 

The National Institutes of 
Health awarded the grant to 
Roman Ganta, professor of di- 
agnostic medicine and palho- 
biology in December Ganla 
said he and his research team 
aim to find broad biological 
models with the vector-borne 
bacteria Ehrlichia chaffeensis 

Vector-borne patho- 

gens interest Ganta because 
they are evolved, he said The 
pathogens must live in vectors 
as well as vertebrae like hu- 
mans, dogs and cattle, Gan- 
ta said. This adaptation is 

Sm PATHOGENS P*g« 7 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2008 



V.il 11/ |Ni.M! 



Bridling the gold 




Photo; by Jonathan Knight | run Mi IAN 



Klndra Gradart sits with her individual and team trophies (middle) they won at last year's AQHA World Championship Show. 

KSU Horse Judging team wins world championship 



ByRyneWItt 

KANSAS STATfc DILI H,IAN 

When, most people 
think of successful K- State 
team, one of the basketball 
teams or the volleyball team 
might come to mind How- 
ever, there is one successful 
team not even in the realm 
of althetics that often goes 
unnoticed. It is the KSU 
Horse Judging team. 

Horse judging is a com 
petition based on overall 
points, and competitors re- 
ceive those points by rank- 
ing and giving reasons to 
support those rankings. 

The KSU Horse Edg- 
ing team has been one uf 
the most successful K-Slate 
teams this year. How suc- 
cessful ? How about world 
champions The team won 
the title at the American 
Quarter Horse Associa- 
tion World Championship 
Show collegiate team-judg- 
ing competition in Ok la ho 
ma City in November 2007, 
canning K-State a world 
championship 

"Extremely proud," said 
|ulie Voge, the team's coach, 



of winning the world cham- 
pionships "It's a great feel 
ing to know that you have 
been involved with nine 
students that have worked 
their butts off all year and 
came away with a great vie 
tory" 

THE TEAM 

This year the team 
had nine members: Kindra 
Gradert, Leo Becker Bil- 
ly Brown, Heather Prisch, 
Kaitlyn Crow, Kally Hood, 
Kay la Lee. Anna Pest a and 
Rachel Sherck 

They work year round 
to improve their skills and it 
shows .Voge said. 

"SotM schools go there 
and kind of show up," Voge 
said "It is reflected in the 
overall score." 

She also said that Col- 
orado State, West Texas 
A&M. Middle Tennessee 
State and Texas Tech are 
some of the main compet- 
itors every year This year, 
K-State beat the second- 
place team by 92 points in 
the world championship. 

See JUDGING Page? 




Kindra 
Gradert 
senior in 
animal 
sciences and 
industry and 
member of 
the KSU Horse 
Judging Team, 
displays the 
belt buckle 
she won at last 
year's AQHA 
World Show. 



AQHA WORLD SHOW 
CONTEST 

tW World Champions 
Z0O0 -2nd<wrill 
2001 -5th menu 
2002- 2nd wwll 
200! -n/j 
20W-4tho«rafi 

2005 rVl 

2006 ft/I 

2007 WorW Champions 



ALL-AMERICAN QUARTER 
HORSE CONGRESS 



1999- litoverall 
2000-HIomtII 
2001 - 3rd overall 
2002- 2nd uwrall 
200! -n/ i 
2004 -n/a 
2005 -n/a 
2006 nit 
2007-'thowr»ll 



Ice-T engages audience with personal stories for MLK Day 




iotlyn Brown | CO] 1 fil ,IAS 

Rapper/actor k«-T speaks as part of the Alpha Phi Alpha Martin Luther 
King Jr. candlelight vigil celebration in Forum Hall. 



By Eric Davis 
KANSAS SUn COUBCUM 

Tracy Marrow, belter 
known as the gangster rapper 
and actor Icc-T endorsed Ba- 
rack Obama. told the story of 
his early gang days and con- 
fessed his love for all-things 
bootlegged Monday night in 
Forum Hall 

Marrow was the keynote 
speaker at the annual Alpha 
Phi Alpha lecture remember- 
ing the life and civil rights 
achievement of Martin Luther 
King Jr. Day and candlelight 
vigil Monday night in Forum 
hall 

The lecture started at 
7:30 but a line stretching up 
a flight of stairs and past the 
food court showed the general 
public was anxious to see the 
star speak 

Marrow became famous 
as a west -coast rapper and lat- 
er built on that fame by ap- 
pearing in movies like "New 
jack City" and TV shows in- 
cluding "Law & Order: Spe- 
cial Victims Unit," 

Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity 
received help from the Union 
Program Council, Leadership 



Studies & Programs and the 
Student Governing Associa- 
tion who gave the $20,000 
needed to bring the star in 

"We thought he would 
deliver a strong message," said 
Careem Gladney. senior in fi- 
nance and president of the At 
pha Phi Alpha fraternity "He 
had a troubled past being a 
former gang member and an 
orphan. So we thought that 
he would be able to give mu 
tivating words to college stu- 
dents" 

Though his rap career is 
no longer Marrow's main fo- 
cus, his onstage persona has 
not changed much over the 
years. The same contempt for 
police brutality and the gov- 
ernment still shines through, 
and Marrow now has calm, al - 
most respectful statements to 
make about the law-enforce- 
ment community 

"I respect cops." Marrow 
said "'Cop Killer' [Marrow's 
controversial gangster rap 
song, released in 1992] wasn't 
a record against police, it was 
a record against police brutal 

ity" 

Marrow said he chose to 
make the album a rock record 



because he felt the message of 
(he song was geared toward 
the rock genre. 

The controversial rock a I 
bum released by Marrow band 
Body Count entitled "Cop 
Killer." was also a topic Mar- 
row discussed. 

Other topics addressed 
by the rapper included every 
thing from advice lo parents 
to insights on the personal life 
of former rapper and friend, 
TuPac Shakur 

One mother asked Mar- 
row what he would say to 
her young son who is torn be- 
tween two different groups of 
friends 

"1 know this sounds 
corny," Marrow said, "but lis- 
ten to your mother She might 
be the only person that loves 
you one day." 

Even though Marrow 
was speaking in remembrance 
of Dr King, the main topics 
seemed to be the career and 
life of the rapper 

Despite the lack of dis- 
cussion of serious modern day 
civil rights movements, the 
crowd was receptive of the 
message being conveyed by 
Marrow 




w m 




GUILD Wi 



PAGE 10 



■■■■■■Mi 



■MMMMIa*^ 



PAGE 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2008 



€fafiin RooA* and £opUi 



1814 Ctaflin Rd. 
www clatlinboQks com 



k 



(785) 7?6-J777 
Fax (785) 776-1009 



PUZZLES | EUGENE SHEFFER 



THIS WEEK 



A look at events that occurred during this week in history 



Monday 



1793: KING LOUIS XVI EXECUTED 



ACROSS 

1 "My 
bfitf" 

5 Bream's 
breather 

• intimi- 
date 

12 Gambling 
game 

13M..-I 
melody 

14 Pi 
follower 

15 Audition- 
ing 

17 Yang 
counter- 
part 

18 Straw- 
berry 
steed 

19 'Silas 
Marner" 
author 

21 Bistros 

14 Fiber 
source 

25 Look 
lecher 
ously 

26 Trail 
the 
pack 

30 Possibly 
will 

31 Reel 
material 

32 Comic 
teno 



33 Apes and 
km 

35 Macad- 
amize 

36 Infamous 
lyre 
player 

37F>at party 

gut 
38Gls 

alarm 

clock 
40 Get ready 

42 Genetic 
abor 

43 Skiltet 

40 List- 
ending 
abbr 

49 Partially 
mine 

50 Desire 

51 Affliction 

52 Stench 

53 Unadul- 
terated 



23 



24 



M 



27 



DOWN 

1 Frequent 

iy 

2 Rowing 
need 

3 Snoop 

4 Evening 
altair 

5 Head 
over 
heels 

6 Press 
agent? 

7 Actress 
Lucy 

6 Sideways 28 
9 Binge of 

tears 
IfJCteve 

kinds 

pJaM 

11 Reluse 1o 34 
16 Ph bk 

H,il,i 
20 Fall 
behind 



29 



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Freebie 

Culture 

medium 

Snoopy. 

in hts 

t.mtasies 

Support 

group? 

Hernando 

de — 

More 

than due. 

lewer 

th.in 
quallro 
Strom bolt 

■ I" .'n]t> 

"Mine — 

have 

seen " 

Tend 

Brooks or 

Blanc 

Cork 

ihoom 

Toe tally 
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tible 
heap 
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the line 
FH.'gif I 

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opposite 
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One day after 
being ton ukted 
of conspiracy with 
foreign power? 
and sentenced 
to death by the 
f tench National 
Convention, 
King Louis XVI is 
executed by guil- 
lotine in the Place 
de la Revolution in 
Pans 




THURSDAY 




1935: 1ST CANNED 
BEER GOES ON SALE 

Canned beer rrwde its debut 
on this day in 1935. In partnership 
with the American Can Company, the 
Gotttrted Krueger Brewing Company 
delivered 2.000 cans of Krueger s fin- 
est Beer and Krueger i Cream Ale to 
faithful Krueger drinkers in Richmond. 
Virginia Ninpty one percent of the 
drinkers approved of the canned beer. 
driving Krueger to give the green I ight 
to further production 



Today 



1973: U5. SUPREME COURT LEGALIZES ABORTION 



in a hlstorrc decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled m floe v, Wade that women, as pari of 
their constitutional right to privacy, can terminate a pregnancy during its first two tr.mesters Only 
during the last trimester, when the fetus can survive outside the womb, would states be permirtgr- 
to regulate abortion of a healthy pregnancy, J * 

The controversial ruling, essentially reversing a century of anti-abortion legislation in the 
United Mates, was the result ot a call by many American women for control over their own repro^ 
ductlve processes. Although defended by the Supreme Court on several occasions, the legallia » 
tion of abortion became a divisive and intensely emotional public issue. •» 



WEDNESDAY 



15S6: DEADLIEST EARTHQUAKE ROCKS CHINA 

On this day In 1 556. an earthquake in Shaanm. China, killed an estimated 830.000 people CounC 
tog casualties Is often Imprecise after large stale disasters, especially prior to the 20th century, but irfjg 
disaster is still cons Idered the deadliest of al 1 1 1 me ^ 

The quake Struck in late evening, with aftershocks continuing through the following morning . 
The magnitude of the quake was appropriately BO to 8 3. which isn't close to the strongest tremor oaZ 
record However, the quake struck in the middle of a densely populated area with poorly constructed 
buildings and homes, resulting m » homhc death toll ^ 



FRIDAY 



1905: WORLD'S LARGEST DIAMOND FOUND 



On January 21 190S, at the Premier Mine in Pretoria, South Africa. 
a 3,106-caral diamond was discovered during* routine inspection by 
the mines superintendent Weighing 1,33 pounds and christened 
the'Cullinan," it was the largest diamond ever found 




— his Jorycfiannef com 



THE BLOTTER 
ARRESTS IN RILEY COUNTY 



1-22 



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Friday's ('npUKiiiip: STANDING in \l til \ 
llt/ZVINC. ARRAY Of CORNFIELDS, I II I I AS 
moiltiH I'M I OS I IN \ \1\i/l- 

Tocluy \ Cry pux|uip Clue: II equal* Y 



The Collegian takes reports directly from 
the fliley County Police Departments daily 
logs. The Collegian does not list wheel 
locks or minor traffic violations because of 
space constraints 

THURSDAY, MN. 17 

Lauren Vanarsdale Jackson. 601 Yuma 

St at 10 a m for probation violation Bond 

was 4 1 S00 

John Robert Keenan. 506 N 12th St., at 

1 0-04 am for possession of a controlled 

substance or narcotic and unlawful posses 

slon of a depressant oi narcotic Bond was 

51,500 

Eric Matthew Batchman 1426 laws 

Drive, at 3 p m tor thflt Bond was St ,000 

Chance Ray Jackson 620 Thurston St.. 

f p m for driving wiih a canceled or 
suspended license Bond was S7S0 
Tool Leigh Lowry Fori Riley, at 5:30 p.m 
lor probation violation Bond was St.SOO 
Celena Carta GayUn. Newton Kan, at 



7:16 p.m. for failure to appear Bond was 

SS0O 

Lonnie Leon Gallaug her 180S Etitkson 

St.. at 10.40 p.m. for theft Bond was St.SOO 

FRIDAY, MN. 18 

Michael Lee Torrance II, Fort Hi ley. at 1 

am. for disorderly conduct. Bond was $750 

Eric J a met Wilson Robinson J 1 30 Col 

lege Heights Road, at 2 a m for disorderly 

conduct, Bond was $1300. 

Travis Dean Newell, dskaloosa, Kan at 

2:1$ am for disorderly conduct. Bond was 

SS00 

Scott Edward Warren. Lawrence, at 21 $ 

a.m. (or obstruction of the legal process 

Bond was $750. 

Leslie Rote flee, Andover. Kan, at 218 am 

for driving under the influence. Bond was 

S7S0 

Richard Lee Burn*. 42 1 N, 16th St. at 3 

a m for violation r>( a protective order. No 

bond was set. 



CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS 

There was an error in Fridays Collegian Kansas Demoottim allowing voters to register for 
the party s caucus on site up to one hour before the event. The Collegian regrets this error. 
It you see something that should be corrected, call news editor Owen Kennedy at |7B5) 
$32-6556 or e-mail toMegrorxaspuMiu.edu 



WEDNESDAY'S WEATHER 

PARTLY CLOUDY High 1 28" Low | 3 9 



Royal Purple yearbook 



we've got the stories you've got to read 



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THE PLANNER 

CAMPUS BULLETIN BOARD 



Applications lor Student Alumni 
Board are available at the Alumni 
Center or online at www kstate 
com/students/stuclentalumni- 
baordaspx An information recep 
tion will be at the Alumni Center 
at 4;30 p.m Feb S lor anyone 
interested in learning more about 
the group. Applications are due at 
the Alumni Center by 5 p m Feb. 7 

Relay for Life of Kansas State 

University will have a team 
captains' meeting at 7 p.m. today 
at the firehouse on the corner ol 
Denison and Kimball avenues Sur 
viyors are invrted to come and be 
celebrated, and they are asked to 
arrive 4$ minutes early to receive 
free gifts and snacks Teams can 
sign up at www.events cancer.org/ 
rllkstateks 

The Sth annual Brett Cushen 
berry Memorial Bui I riding will be 
at 7 p.m. Saturday in Weber Arena. 



Admission for adults is $10. $5 
with a K State ID and for children 
aged 6 to 1 2. and free for children 
younger than 6 years old 

Students for Barack Obama will 

have a weekly meeting at 6 p m. 
today in the Big 1 2 room of the 
K- State Student Union. The group 
will be scheduling volunteer 
activities tor the coming week and 
holding a bnet caucus training 
activity. 

Rec Fett will be today at S;j0 
p.m. at the Peters Recreation 
Center. Participants can sample 
BOSU. indoor cycling and group 
fitness session A student ID or 
facility membership is required 

To place m item in the Campus Bulletin 
stop by Kediw 1 16 and fill out a form 
or email the news editor at (oWegun . 
ipubiui.tdu by 1 1 a.m. two days before 
it is lu run. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The Collegian, a student newspaper at Kansas State University, is pub J5 
llshed by Student Publications Inc It is published weekdays during th ey 
school year and on Wednesdays during the summer Periodical postage 
is paid at Manhattan, KS. POSTMASTER; Send address changes to the — 
circulation desk at Kediie 103. Manhattan, KS 66506-7167. First copy _" 
free, additional copies 2$ cents [USPS 291 02) — 

Kansas State Collegian. 2006 



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TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 3 



Community celebrates MLK Week with local performances 



Committee provides memorial service featuring musical 
entertainment, awards Saturday night at Manhattan High 




Matt Castro | I 01 1 H ,l,\\ 
Richard Pitu, Sylvia Biemin and Patricia Brown Barnatt Manhattan residents, play theif djembes 
Saturday evening at Manhattan High East Campus Auditorium, The event was part of the Martin Luther 
King Jr. community celebration service. 



By Brandon Stetnert 
KANSAS viaihiahiHjIan 

The Manhattan Martin 
Luther King Memorial Com- 
mittee celebrated Martin Lu- 
ther King Jr Day of remem- 
brance with a Saturday night 
service at Manhattan High's 
East Campus Auditorium 

|im Spencer, chairman 
of the committee, and other 
members organized a plellm 
ra of entertainers. He said or- 
ganizing the event took many 
hours of preparation, 

"We work hard all year 
long," Spencer said. "We start- 
ed planning in April 2007" 

A percussion perfor- 
mance started off the show 
As the night progressed, sev- 
eral more forms of talent were 
demonstrated. 

Andy Bell played the alto 



saxophone while accompa- 
nied by Greg Stephens on pi- 
ano. They played "Amazing 
Grace" and Grover Washing- 
Ion Jr.'s "Sad Song." 

"1 really appreciate the 
opportunity to come out and 
be a part of the celebration." 
Bell said. 

Following Bell was a 
band performance by The In- 
cinerated Windsock Quartet 

"1 think everybody en- 
joyed it," said Aliyah Ste- 
phens, lead vocalist and gui- 
tarist of the group "I thought 
we picked appropriate 
songs." 

Stephens said the group 
formed more than a year ago 
and now tours Aggie vi lie bars 
with 10 to 15 original songs 

Spencer said he thought 
the highlight of the show was 
the speech given by Diversity 



Coordinator for Manhattan- 
Ogden USD 383 Tiffany Pow- 
ell 

Powell spoke about dis- 
crimination in schools be- 
tween teachers and students 
She said discrimination still 
exists and that one of her 
goals as diversity coordina 
tor was to eradicate the prob- 
lem. After the speech, she an- 
swered several questions from 
the audience. Stephanie 
Sharp of the Manhattan Chris 
tian College Dancers took the 
stage next and showed off her 
dancing talents, followed by a 
poem read by Spencer. 

After the event, members 
of the committee and attend- 
ees participated in a lighted 
candle memorial walk to the 
First Lutheran Church The 
walk commemorated the civ- 
il rights marches led by King. 



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Shoppers enjoy groups' live music, dancing shows 
in food court Monday at the Manhattan Town Center 




ioslyn Brown | < (HI H.IAN 
Expressions of Praise from the Fellowship Temple perform one of their four numbers for Martin Luther 
King Jr. Day at to a.m. Monday at the Manhattan Town Center. The group practices at least twice a month 
for performances in the community. 



By Brandon Steinert 

KANMSsiAl'fcuiLlKilAN 

Drums and loud music 
might have distracted curi- 
ous shoppers at the Manhat- 
tan Town Center on Mon 
day The Manhattan Martin 
Luther King Memorial Com- 
mittee organized an event to 
celebrate the national hol- 
iday with music, dancing, 
singing and a variety of oth- 
er shows of talent. 

The theme for the event 
was "A Day On, Not A Day 
Off" The event began at 10 
am in the mall food court 
and continued until 4 pm 

Twenty to 30 people at- 
tended at the beginning, and 
by 11. about 100 people had 
sniped to enjoy the musical 
performances 

"It's more crowded than 
past years," said Kalhy Sw- 
enson. first grade teacher at 
Manhattan Ogden USD 583, 



Swenson said she attends the 
event every year and occasion 
ally has students involved. 

One of the notable per 
formances was by a group 
called Expressions of Praise. 
The group danced to a few 
songs with pa in led -white fac- 
es in a style that represented 
emotional extremes 

"It was very involving," 
Swenson said 

Several other dance 
groups performed throughout 
the day, each with a different 
style 

At about midday, several 
awards were announced 

Author Geraldine Wa] 
ton received one of two 
Spirit of Martin Luther King 
Service Awards presented 
by James Hardy, trustee of 
the Manhattan Community 
Foundation 

"Anyone who's anyone 
in Manhattan knows Gerry 
Walton." Hardy said during 



the announcement 

Waltun said she learned 
the importance of commu- 
nity early in her life and she 
knew she wanted (o make 
something of herself 

"All you have to do is 
keep trying," Walton said 
during her acceptance- 
speech 

The other recipient was 
the Rev Don Fallon. Fallon 
said it came as a surprise to 
him that he was chosen for 
the award 

He served K State's 
campus as a minister far 30 
years before retiring in May 
2007 The win- 

ners of the King Art and Es- 
say Contest also were an- 
nounced. Only 17 submitted 
were selected out of 250 en- 
tries 

"This is a very impor- 
tant event for the commu- 
nity," Swenson said "It lets 
you revitalize every year" 




We've got the stories you've got to read. 

The Royal Purple yearbook is available in Kedzie 103. Stop by or call 532-6555. 



PAGE 4 



OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 22,5008 



HIT OR MISS I nwf<litwM,b < wr ' )4ptetBH,tDrMMto p* sjn(!wT ' mtt>erTi 

| 3TlPf £f 



i majority wte This K tfw Collfg wrrt offKiril opmicfl 




HIT | K-STATE BASKETBALL 

Both the men's and women's teams have 
had strong starts in conference play. The 
men are 2-0 after knocking off No 10 
Texas A&M and the women are 4-0 after 
beating Colorado 




MISS | ICE-STORM CLEAN UP 

Though this winter's ice storm was more 
than a month ago. there is still debris 
littered throughout the city 




HIT 1 3-DAY WEEKEND 

Everyone can probably agree that am 
extra-long weekend is always enjoyable 
even though we've only been to two days 
of our spring-semester classes. 




MISS | WEATHER 

No one was probably able to enjoy the 
long weekend because of the cold weath- 
er At least we don't live in Green Bay, 
Wis where the Packers and the New 
York Giants played the NFC champion- 
ship game in sub-zero degree weather. 




HIT | MLK GARDEN 

After seeing the Collegian story about 
the Coretta Scott King Gardens of En- 
gagement, a few people called to find out 
how to make a donation. 




MISS | H0SKINS INJURY 

Senior forward David Hoskins will » 
miss the rest of the season to have knee 
surgery Hopefully he can make a full' 
recovery and maybe even play basketball 
again '.'t 



Famous explorer bettered 
the world with generosity 



atop 



When Sir Edmund 
Hillary died earlier this 
month, the world lost not 
only a brave ad- 
venturer but a hu- 
manitarian and 
inspiring person- 
ality 

To some, Hil- 
lary is known 
only for the first 
line of his Ian 1 1 
obituary in The 
New York Times: 
on May 29. 1955. 

he and Nepalese 

climber Tenzing 
Nurgay became the firs) 
humans known to reach 
the summit of Mount 
Everest at 29,035 feet 
above sea level 

On Jan ILTheLon 
don limes reported Hil- 
lary was a citizen of New 
Zealand by birth and a 
beekeeper by trade He 
was a towering man - 6 
feet, 5 inches tall - whose 
physical accomplishments 
rightfully earned him the 
title of world explorer. 
According to his book, 
"The Ascent of Everest," 
by the time he climbed to 
the summit in 1953. he al 
ready had scaled II oth- 
er peaks of more than 
20,000 feel in the Himala- 
yas. He crossed Antarcti- 
ca and reached the South 
Pole in 1958, and wrote 
about the experience 
in his book, "No Lati- 
tude for Error'' In 1985 
he landed a plane at the 
North Pole and became 
the first man to complete 
the hat trick of standing 
at both poles and Ihe top 
of Everest 

Besides conquer- 
ing Earth's most hazard 
ous climates, Hillary also 
chose to fill his life with 




service to others. He was 
a member of the Roy- 
al New Zealand air force 
during World War 
1 1 . New Zealand's 
ambassador to In- 
dia, Bangladesh 
and Nepal; presi 
dent o( his coun- 
try s Peace Corps; 
and founder of the 
Sir Edmund Hil- 
lary Himalayan 
Trust 
Hillary's lorgot 

ten legacy - and 

maybe his most 
important - was his role 
as a conservationist and 
philanthropist His ef- 
forts led Nepal to estab- 
lish the area surround- 
ing Mount Everest as 
a national park The 
London Times report- 
ed his foundation built 
26 schools, more roads 
and health clinics in 
Nepal 

Hillary has been 
the hero of ambitious 
mountain climbers the 
world over, as well as 
children who learn his 
name and would-be 
adventurers who live 
in nature and attempt to 
tame it But Hillary prob- 
ably hoped he would 
be remembered for the 
mountain he worked so 
hard to preserve, by the 
schoolchildren who study 
in the buildings his foun- 
dation built and in honor 
of his respect for the envi 
roil merit. 

Hillary, humble and 
hardworking, showed 
us big achievements arc 
not out of reach. Few of 
us will climb the world's 
highest mountain or ac- 
complish similar feats of 
incredible strength and 




endurance, but what 
ever our goals and as 
pirations, Hillary empha- 
sized the most important 
factors in success are de- 
sire and personal com- 
mitment He reminded us 
that, "It is not the moun 
tain we conquer, but our 
selves" 

He used his fame as 
a renowned explorer not 
to advance his own par 



tfculu agenda but 
to raise iwtmM ol 
the social economic, en- 
vironmental and health 
conditions in Nepal. Af- 
ilt Hillary reached the 
top nf Eveml in May 
1953. doing what so many 
had called impossible. 
his journey had just he 
gun It is for a lifetime of 
■cbievemerri - the work 
that came after his gruel- 



Nate St hmiot| COLLEUIAN 



ing conquest of that great 
mountain - that he is 
even more deserving of 
our respect. 

Sir Edmund Hillary 
died of a heart attack in 
New Zealand on |an 11. 
He was 88. 



lot resit n is a senior in politic*! 
so* nee. Please tend comments to 

opinion Mfiu&.ijir.erfu. 



Strike to blame for cancelled award shows 



\»A 



TVIER 
SMITH 



It's been called the big- 
gest party of the year, hut this 
year's Golden Globe Awards 
was any- 
thing but 
Usually 
filled with 
celebrities 
in i tut fits 
that would 
make 
Prank Si- 
natra look 
unpro 
fessional, 
the Gold 
en Globes 

wasn't even a show - it was a 
news conference. Celebrities 
were not present. 

Grateful direeiors didn't 
accept awards with tear -filled 
eyes and thank you lists as 
long as toilet paper rolls 

The awards and their re 
eipients were read off in a 
quick and professional man- 
ner No red carpet, no |oan 
Rivers - just an hour of un 
ceremonious presentation 

This marks the first great 
bailie ol the writers' strike, 
resulting in a veritable stand- 
still of Hollywood activity 

With the backbone of 



the entertainment industry 
standing in picket lines and 
writing scathing blog en- 
tries, there was no one to fill 
in the blanks, to write intros 
or any of the other speech- 
es award shows are usually 
filled with 

This is big news; it's just 
that the people who would 
normally tell you about it 
are, well, writers 

And there certainly has 
not been much writing go-* 
ing un 

No one can tell how 
long this will last, or how 
long il will take for one side 
lo give in to the other One 
thing is certain in Holly- 
wood though - the fate of 
the Oscars is in grave dan- 
ger 

The greatest award 
show on nun cable TV 
could suffer the worst blow 
in its history 

Last year it was an 
nuunced that the Oscars 
were "going green " This 
year il seems they will be 
going nowhere 

But what about the 
shows that are somehow 
still running, like "The Dai 



ly Show" or "The Late Show 
with David Letlerman"? 
Lelterman's production 
company signed a strike 
waiver, according to Time 
sOnlinecom, and "The Dai- 
ly Show" is running without 
writers and makes almost 
constant cracks about the 
lack of direction. 

It would seem this 
couldn't last much longer. 
Huge amounts of money 
are being lost daily on each 
side of the picket line The 
studios have to be getting 
queasy, and for the most 
part the writers will actually 
be hungry soon. 

The Oscars probably 
will go on as they have for 
the past 80 years, though 
deals will have to be made 
while this is going on - as 
writers don't make mun 
ey and producers lose it - 
as we learn it shows us that 
everyone, big and small, is 
mad about something 

The term "strike" nor- 
mally conjures images of 
the Teamsters and steel mill 
workers marching up and 
down the streets trying to 
make life a little better for 



themselves and drab 

families 

Il l^ 

I familiar 
names and (acei 
doing the same 

Sip until the 
time comes when 
TV and movies are 
cranked out once 
more and one side 
is happier than the 
other, we will have 
to deal with oth- 
er forms of enter 
tainment 

In some 
selfish way, it's 
kind of nice 
to see Hul 
lywood gel 
kicked 
in Ihe 
teeth 
now and 
again 



Tyler Smith 
it a junior in 
English. Pleas* 

lend comments to 
opinion ,i ipub.ksu 
till. 




THEF0URUM ■' 

1785)395*444 " 

MO 

The Campus Fourum is thf 
Collegian's anonymous can** 
tem. The Fouium Is edite^to 
eliminate vulgar, racist, ooscpTm" 

and libelous comments. Wt 

comments ate not the opirrfwi 

of the Collegian not are (hey 

endowed by the editorial s'faV 

frank Uartin lock, like Bert off'Sesinie 
Street." End of story. ~j 

I didn't see any Eskimos working the 
corner yesterday Maybe its just too, told 
for them when il snows out. 



I missed you 

iia 

I woke up at B 11 for in tW 
ilass How t made it, I'll never know,^" 

I know the Stun i guy, and he's weak sauce 

Th* Slum guy has diabetes. Be careljj — 
it's contagious. 

loii the underground and boycott the' 
Stuni 

Everybody I saying that Ice -I is couhjij 
lo campus, but I thought ihey alreadyacld 
some at the Stuni. — 

Only KU fans hate the Stum. » 

dixit, finding yourself in the wiongSss 
is awesome. Z 

I should get paid a dollar for every tmw 
my Collegian Focicum comment gets 
p ri Med . Doesn't that ma ke sense ? « 

W« play for keeps. •■ 

Urn. I thought this was Safe Aide MySct 

Hey, Theia: you guys musl never eaf^ 
dinner because we've had your bell *J> 
October — 

Hi, f ou rum I may be in Riverside, (ffi 
hull still think of you all the time C^r 
get back together? •» 

So the baseball learn signing autographs 
was super funny — ; 

o 

I hke how the student section at the gifls 
game was filled with high schoolers, ■ 
Otdn'l know they went to school here ", 

a 
■ 

I caught Michael Beastey s sweat towel! 

Th* Stuni guy brings glory to rooms ",! 
everywhere and also bugs the hell ouf Jf 
fraternities J 

• 

Hey G Phi quit hazing us • 

* 

Roundabouts are stupid Do not bijjlnj 
any more and tear down Ihe ones you A 
already butll * • 



COLLEGIAK 

Jon jthjn Garten 

IfjiioniNtmn ', 

Saltn* Str#M | WW XrlDG t WICW ', 
Willow Wlllomion I M»N»i,IW.[DI10«; 
Owan Ktwirwdy | n[ ws IL" It* 
Hannah Bllck I irjpyc rill r \ 
Scott Gtrard | [OW CWtl | 

Annan* Liwi.ii | wuitimi I"* tin i<* ! 
Shall* 1111* I : ikWMOIIM J 
Al« Pttk | M it)U iBUM 
Bf*ndonSt*intrtIMIt«ltCirO« I 
Kelt** No*l I OeiHION ttMTOJ 
Wandy Haun | SIWSfOITOFi 

io»i j.niiwi | sums ecu ra« ; 

Nicola Johmlon | SH(l«lS!£TiW,fDiTW 
TyU* ft*yrwldi | *tj WNWI \ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN ; 

new*t$ipob.li$ii.edu 
Kecfeie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506: 

DISPLAY ADS (785)532-6560 

CLASSIFIED ADS (785)532-6555 

DELIVERY (785)532-6555. 

NEWSROOM (785)512-6556 

I 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to tfe 
editor They can be submitted by e-mail. 
ToJertmrrMpvcUsti rtfu, ot in person to! 
Kedne 116. Please mdude your full nari)e. 
year in school and major Letters ihoulcHe 
limited to 250 words All submitted letters 
mighi be edited lor length and clarity I 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGES 



Popular Aggieville coffeehouse 
displays local artists' talent 



ByJoeVossen 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

At Radina's Coffeehouse 
and Roast ery, the Java shop in 
Aggieville thats faithful clien- 
tele calls comfortable and cuol, 
the draw is more than great 
coffees and breads 

Radina's features different 
artists each month, displaying 
their work prominently on the 
walls Pieces can be admired 
and purchased by customers. 

Artist Fred Rohs, a native 
of Manhattan, is showcasing 
his art at Radina's. Rohs gradu- 
ated from K-State in 1993 with 
a bachelor's degree in fine arts. 
and now lives in MaryviUe, 
Mo , with his wife 

Rohs said art has been a 
lifelong passion for him He 
said he has been drawing and 
sketching since he was old 
enough to hold a pencil He 
said the art of the 2- D surface 
always has been his main inter 
est, and paint became his favor- 
ite medium Through the years, 
he said his art has been shown 
in a variety of unorthodox ven- 
ues- 

Mv work has also been 
shown at other coffee shops, an 
optometry office and galleries 
in Kansas City and MaryviUe," 
he said "I operated my own 
gallery here in MaryviUe for 
about three years." 

Stepping into Radina's, it 
is hard not to notice his paint- 
ings The pieces, some several 
feet in height, stand out with 
striking colors and unusual im- 
ages. Rohs is hesitant to cate- 
gorize his art, but says he some 
times calls his works " nonrep- 
resented onal optical art" 

"People want to call it ab 
street art. but abstract art actu- 
ally starts with realism, some 
thing tangible, and in my art I 
really don't start with any mam 
object," Rohs said "I think you 
can see that in my paintings 




Witt Cirtro | COLLEGIAN 

Shawn Nourl graduate in computer science, sits down at Radina's 
Coffee House Monday evening to enjoy a drink and get some work 
done Radina's hosts local artist's work every month. 



and their titles. They're very 
unrevealing." 

Most of his works on dis- 
play at Radina's are acrylics 
painted on canvas A lew piec 
es on paper and one oil paint 
ing also can be seen. With such 
visual complexity in his work, 
it is no surprise how much time 
and energy Rohs invest* 

"1 do each painting by 
hand - it can be pretty metic- 
ulous One of the larger paint- 
ings took me about 200 hours," 
he said "l try to make [my art] 
visually striking. I try to take 
the shapes and images I lay 
er and use color and composi- 
tion to make it visually interest- 
ing. There is an initial impact 
of colors that jump at you, but 
then you notice other things 
about it you didn't initially" 

Rohs cited painters )osef 
Albers, Larry Poons, and Was- 
sily Kandinsky as artistic in 
spiration In addition, certain 
styles have played a role in his 
development as an artist, he 
said. 

"I've always been drawn 
to graphic art, comic books, 
graphic advertising and pop art 



and that comes through in my 
paintings," he said 

Annette Radina, wife of 
the coffeeshop's owner Wade 
Radina, said the artists cho- 
sen to display their work each 
month are a mix of alumni, stu- 
dents and community mem- 
bers 

"We just want to give peo- 
ple a chance to show their 
work," she said There are a lot 
of artists out there who would 
like to show it but don't know 
where to go. We try to be ac- 
cessible to as many people as 
possible." 

The artists might appre- 
ciate the opportunity to show 
their work in public, but it is 
there for the customers to en- 
joy as well 

"This particular show is 
interesting," said Len McDon- 
ald, a Radina's regular. "It has 
a wonderful complexity and 
movement. The craftsmanship 
of these particular pieces is bet- 
ter than the norm." 

The paintings of K State 
alumnus Fred Rohs will be on 
display at Radina's through 
January. 



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MERCY 



Commission to vote on intersection 
construction, cheap housing tonight 



By Corent Bmcndin* 
KANSAS STATE COLLEUIAN 

Commissioners wilt dis- 
cuss intersection improve- 
ments and affordable hous- 
ing development tonight at 
the city commission meet- 
ing. 

The commissioners will 
vote on proposed improve- 
ments to the intersection at 
U.S. Highway 24 and Mar 
latl Avenue. The proposition 
includes dedicated turning 
lanes, traffic lights and the 
aligning of Marlatt Avenue 
according to the agenda. 

Along with moving pow 
er, water and sewer lines, the 
proposition includes how 
much monetary com pens a 
tion the city will appropri 
ate to private citizens for the 
property that must be pur- 
chased to allow for the right 



of way because of the enlarge 
ment of the intersection, said 
Commissioner Bruce Snead 

"It has been a high ac 
cident intersection." Snead 
said 

Other roads in town un- 
der development include 
Fort Riley Boulevard, Davis 
Drive and the intersection of 
Juliette and Bluemont Ave- 
nues, he said 

The second agenda item 
concerns the Manhattan 
Area Housing Partnership 
The MAHP requests the 
city's support ol the MAHP 
application to the State of 
Kansas fur tax credits and 
other funding to build more 
affordable housing in Man- 
hattan. 

If approved, the MAHP 
will receive $1,227,000 from 
the state to build four du 
plexes to house a total of 



eight families who qualify as 
low income, Snead said 

He also said the units 
each will include three bed 
rooms and a two-car garage. 
The MAHP already has com 
pleted 12 homes and one 
apartment complex in the 
Manhattan area. 

"I think it is very likely 
the commission will support 
the resolution as it has sup 
ported [MAHP) in the past." 
Snead said 

Snead also said he want 
ed the community to be 
aware that the commission 
will schedule a public hear 
ing to discuss a bond propos 
al that would fund 39 spe- 
cial projects around Man- 
hattan, The projects include 
street, sewer, and water-line 
improvements and develop- 
ment The hearing will be on 
Feb 5 





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PAGE 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



In good hands 




Mm Castro | UlUhGlAN 

Freshman forward Michael Baaslay celebrates at the end of the game Saturday evening at Bramlage Coliseum by showing fans his appreciation for their support 
Below: 

K-State claws past No. 9 A&M to 2-0 Big 12 record 



By Wendy Haun 
UHUS STATS CQUSGIAN 

When senior guard Clent Stewart's 
over -t he-back rebound nearly went in 
the hoop, that's when coach Frank Mar- 
tin knew 

"When 1 saw him throw the ball over 
his shoulder and that ball almost goes 
in ... I turned to my staff and said, 'You 
know what, guys'' I don't care what hap 
pens We aren't losing lunight," Martin 
said. 

After junior forward Andre Gilbert 
cleaned up the rebound with an easy 
layup, K State (12 4, 2 Big 12 Confer 
enee) was looking at an 18- point leud 
over the No. 10 team in the country with 
less than two minutes left in regulation. 

Three Wildcats finished the 75*54 
rout in double figures: freshman forward 
Michael Beasley. who had 21 points; 
freshman forward Bill Walker, with 19 
points, and Stewart, who chipped in It) 
Walker's 19 points included five of 10 
from beyond the arc and netted him a Big 
12 Rookie of the Week honor for the sec- 
ond time this season. 

"Bill has an incredible will," Martin 
said "He's an unbelievable competitor 
He's taken on the challenge of leading 
our basketball team right now He's be- 
come our voice. He's doing a heck of a 
job of bringing it and practicing the right 
way and that's translating to success for 
him on the court and success for us" 

The leading rebounder was senior 



guard Blake Young, who had nine re- 
bounds 

"Blake plays with a lot of energy," 
Stewart said "You can see his quick 
ness on the court When you're out there 
playing with guys who play that hard. 
you stick out like a sore thumb when you 
don't play as hard as them. He's all over 
the place for us, defensively and offen- 
sively He's a senior, so he's been around, 
and he knows what to do and how to win 
the game " 

Texas A&M (15 1. 1-2 Big 12) shot 
abysmally in the second half, only MW 
ing 26 percent of the time from the floor, 
including one of six from 1 point range 
The Aggies were led in scoring by junior 
forward [osh Carter, who had 13 points 

Also scoring in double figures were 
senior center Joseph |ones : who had 12 
points, and sophomore guard Donald 
Sloan, who had 10. The Aggies' lead- 
ing rebounder was freshman center De- 
Andre Jordan, who had six boards. Ag- 
gies' coach Mark Turgeon, who is a for- 
mer player for the University of Kansas, 
said K-State outplayed his team in every 
facet 

"I thought K- St ate was unbelievable," 
Turgeon said "I'll give K State the credit: I 
don't know who could have beat them to- 
day Today, they were as good as anyone 
we've ever played. We were focused and 
ready to play, and we couldn't finish in the 
second half They're good at home. 

See MEN. PagtS 




Jostyn Brown | ( OLlEtilAN 



Dietz leads Cats to win over Buffs, reaches 1 ,000-point mark 



K-State guard 
Kimbarty Dim 

battles for a 

loose ball against 

Colorado's 

Brittany Spears 

in the first half 

of the Wildcats 

67-60 win over 

the Buffaloes on 

Saturday niqh! 

in Bramlage 

Coliseum 



Jonathan Knight 
COUBGWN 




By Mik« Oevader 

KANSAS MATH Ol I H.tAN 

1 1 wa;. ;i star studded edi 
lion of K State women's bas- 
ketball as Brittany Spears and 
Whitney Houston were pres- 
ent for the game Saturday 
night at Bramlage Coliseum. 

However, instead of be- 
ing in the stands as celebri- 
ties. Spears and Houston par- 
ticipated in the game as mem 
bers of the Colorado rosier 

The Wildcats seemed to 
come out of the gate a lit- 
tle star-struck, shooting only 



two-of-10 in the first five 
minutes and 25 seconds, bui 
quickly snapped out of it and 
outlasted Colorado, 67 60 

In a game where junior 
guard Shalee Lelming had 
1 1 points and 1 1 rebounds in 
her eighth career double dou 
ble, it em senior gwd Kim 
berly Dielz who led the Wild 
cats in scoring with 18 point! 
and grabbing live defensive 
rebounds. Dietz has scored in 
double figures in her last five 
games, including in 14 of 17 
games played this season. 

junior forward M 



Gibson was next in sconng 
lor the Wildcats with 14 points 
and four rebounds and soph- 
omore forward Ashley Sweat 
chipped in with 12 points and 
two rebounds. 

Coach Deb Patterson 
said she felt Dietz had more 
oi u effect on the game even 
though Lehning had the bel- 
ter slats 

"When the game needed 
a change, Kimberly was the 
one who stepped up," Patter- 
son said "Shalee was about a 

SwWOMIN.f'jotJ 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2008 
WOMEN'S TENNIS 

Coach Bietau 

pleased with 

team's effort 

in Georgia 



By Tyltr Sharp 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIA N 

The K-State women's 
tennis team began its 2008 
spring season with some pos- 
itive efforts at the Georgia 
Invitational 

"I thought we had some 
good performances," coach 
Steve Bietau said "It was our 
last chance to get our act to- 
gether before dual match- 
es and to play without team 
scoring. I was generally 
pleased." 

In doubles action, K 
State's best performances 
came on the last day against 
Troy Last year's top doubles 
team of senior Olga Klimo- 
va and junior Katerina Kud- 
lackova registered an SI 
win over Annabellc Bares 
and Stephanie Vieira eve- 
ning their 2008 record at 1-1. 
In other matches, the teams 
of sophomore Natasha Viei- 
ra and senior Viviana Yrureta 
and freshmen Vanessa Cottin 
and Pauline Guemas were 
also victorious. 

Sunday's results were in 
stark contrast to the doubles 
matches Friday and Saturday 
Against Georgia and Mis- 
sissippi State, K State were 
swept by wide margins 

"1 don't know that the 
performance changed a lot," 
Bietau said of the team's ef- 
fort. "The level of competi- 
tion was the main difference 
It's important to remember 
that this is the first time out 
[this year] and the play is of 
ten ragged The weekend's at 
titude was good but the qual- 
ity of play needs to improve." 

Freshman An tea Huljev 
provided the bright spot 
at singles for the Wild- 
cats. Huljev, who hails from 
Vclenje, Slovenia, defeated 
Troy's Arres Marine 7-5, 6-3 
on Saturday 

On Sunday, she topped 
Mississippi State's Elizabeth 
Hall, 6-4, 6 

Despite her performance, 
Bietau said there is still much 
to be desired by her perfor- 
mance. 

"I'm not very happy," Bi- 
etau said, "It's never a bad 
thing when you win two 
matches, and the play im- 
proved as the weekend went 
on. But the play can be much 
better." 

The team must now pre- 
pare for the transition to dual 
matches from tournament 
play 

"The big difference will 
be the players not playing 
just for themselves," Bielau 
said, "When we start all du 
als, all points count for the 
team" 

Three home matches 
also await the Wildcats, who 
have yet to play at home. The 
dual play action will begin at 
10 am Feb 2 when Syracuse 
visits Ahearn Field House. 

"We're always glad to 
play at home," Bietau said 
"Ahearn 's been good to us 
We have a week to prepare 
and hopefully we'll be ready 
to be go by then." 

Bietau said the experi- 
ence was beneficial to the 
overlying issues still facing 
the team. 

"We have a long ways 
to go and - second - clear- 
ly have things to build on," 
he said. "It was (ust a good 
chance to get on the court 
and work. That was the main 
thing this weekend " 



Senior David 

Hoik ins will 

miss the rest 

of the season 

and will have 

surgery on his 

left knee Feb. 1 



File Phot* 
CM.LK.IAN 




Hoskins to undergo surgery 



The report on Senior David 
Hoskins' knee is finally in: the se- 
nior forward will miss the rest of 
the season 

Hoskins, who injured his knee 
prior to this season while playing 
in a Pro- Am tournament in August. 
was going to be back in action at 
the beginning of the season, but re- 
injured his knee in practice in Oc- 
tober He will have meniscal trans- 
plant surgery Feb 1 in Chicago 

The surgery is a new proce 
dure and involves transplanting 
tissue from a dead body. A match 
for Hoskins knee has been found 

The expected time of recov 



cry is eight months, according to a 
press release. 

Last year for the Wildcats, 
Hoskins averaged 14 5 points per 
game and usually had almost six 
rebounds per game 

"This is an extremely sad day 
for David and for our basketball 
program," Wildcat coach Frank 
Martin said "However. David will 
be in our thoughts and prayers as 
he goes through the surgery and 
the rehabilitation He deserved 
better than this, but I am confi- 
dent that he will grow and become 
a better person from this experi- 
ence." 



Associated Press Top 25 Poll 
women's basketball rankings 



Ranking School 


Record 


1 . Connecticut 


17-0 


2 Tennessee 


16-1 


3 North Carolina 


17-1 


4 Maryland 


22-1 


5. Rutgers 


15-2 


6 Baylor 


16-1 


7. Stanford 


16-3 


8 California 


17-2 


9 LSU 


14-3 


10 Duke 


14-4 


1 1 Oklahoma 


11-4 


12. West Virginia 


14-2 


13. Old Dominion 


14-3 



Ranking School Record 

14. Oklahoma State 16-1 

15. Ohio State 15.3 
16 Notre Dame 15.3 

17. Georgia 15 3 

18, Wyoming ]&.] 
19 Pittsburgh 14.3 
20. George Washington 14 4 
21 Texas A&M 135 
12. K-State 12.5 

25. Georgia Tech 16 3 , 

24. Syracuse 15.3 ( 

25 Auburn 13.5 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 7 



TRACK AND FIELD 



K-State team sets personal bests, 
receives 7 medals in home meet 



By Stiff Report 

KANSAS STATf. CULlHilAN 

K -Stall- junior Loren 
Groves set a school record 
in the women's weight throw 
Saturday when she threw for 
a distance of 69 22 50. eclips 
ing the previous mark by ex 
actly nine inches 

Groves look first in the 
event, and teammates senior 
Laci Heller and sophomore 
Amanda Boor finished sec 
ond and third respectively 

Junior Alexandra Gon 
zalez won the women's pole 
vault, and senior Lindsay 
Grigoriev won the shot put 

The men's team took sev 
en titles Friday starting with 
junior Eric Thomas in the 
men's weight throw 



Competing in his first 
event as a member of the K- 
Stale track and field team, 
freshman Emmanuel Niezer 
took home the title for the 
long jump. Freshman Michael 
i li'.ilcy followed with a win in 
the high -jump competition 

Junior Mike Myer fin- 
ished first in the men's 60-me 
ter, and sophomore Sam 
lames finished first in the 
600 yard dash 

K Slate capped the day 
by placing first in the men's 
4x400- meter relay, and ju- 
nior Adam Fretwcll took the 
individual prize for the pole 
vault 

K- Stale will compete 
next Saturday at the Confer- 
ence Challenge in Lincoln, 
Neb 




PATHOGENS | K-State researchers use 
federal grant for bacteria, studies 



Jotlyn Brawn | I 111 IM,iA\ 

Junior Nancy Harrington 
competes in the long jump at 
the Wildcat Invitational track 
meet Jan. 19, 



JUDGING | Diversity, recruiting 
brought team to championship 



Continued frwnPjgel 

The overall dynamics of 
the group was diverse with two 
team members from out-of- 
state. Gradert from Cambridge. 
III., and Pest a from Oakburo, 
N C However, the majority of 
the team is comprised of stu- 
dents in the agriculture depart- 
ment. Sherck. junior in Eng- 
lish, is the only member major 
ing outside of the department 
But the team wasn't one that let 
those differences gel in the way 
of winning 

"Everybody really did 
make a big effort to help ev- 
eryone get better." Sherck said 
'Thai just created an atmo- 
sphere that helps me learn" 

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP 

The team overall won the 
world championship, but there 
was one individual who rose 
above the rest and won the in- 
dividual world championship - 
Gradert. 

The Illinois native found 
her way to K Slate through 
Black Hawk College: East Cam- 
pus, which is known for horse 
judging. She placed first overall 
in Oklahoma City, beating out 



teammate Sherck for the award 
of World Champion 

"I was excited lhat every- 
one did so well," Gradert said 
of the world championships "It 
was definitely one of the best 
things in my life." 

Gradert. senior in animal 
science, grew up around hors- 
es, and she said horse judging 
became one of the most impor- 
tant things to her 

"It has been the most pas 
sionatc thing in my life." she 
said "This past fall, the thought 
that kept running through my 
mind was thai I wish I could 
take the fall off [of classes] and 
only judge." 

THE COACH 

Voge has coached the 
horse judging team al K- Stale 
for 10 years, but this was her fi- 
nal year She is leaving the team 
in the hands of Gradert and 
others to carry on the tradition, 
she said. 

"We've been World Cham- 
pion twice and reverse world 
champion twice." Voge said of 
the accomplishments of the 
team since she had been there 

Voge started judging hors- 
es at a young age Her dad was 



her coach and stayed with it 
throughout her whole life She. 
like Gradert, went to Black 
Hawk College: East Campus 
and then went on to Oklahoma 
State before coming to K State 
to get her master's degree and 
coach. 

Voge is the one in charge 
of recruiting - which is mainly 
with students on campus - and 
helping everyone on the team, 
whether it is getting acclimat- 
ed to being away from home 
or just working wilh the horse 
judging team, said Gradert and 
Sherck. 

That is why ending her 
coaching career on a high note 
is something that Voge said she 
really wanted 

"Since it was my last year 
here, I recruited pretty heavily 
to build a kind of legacy to end 
wiili," she said. 

Though Voge is gone, she 
will be on the minds of her for- 
mer judges 

"|ulie Voge is by far one 
of the strongest women I have 
ever met," Gradert said. "She 
is a great coach and extreme 
ly smart. Having her as a friend 
and as a coach has been an ex- 
treme privilege" 



Com»u*d from Pig* 1 

important for the bacteria's sur 
viva I, which means they have 
evolved with their adjustment 
to different host environments. 

"This may be a common 
theme," Ganta said "It's a com- 
mon thread and a common ap- 
proach thai many of these vec- 
tor- borne pathogens use So thai 
means we have a much wid- 
er application and understand- 
ing in having control methods if 
we know how the vector borne 
pathogens have adapted to dif- 
ferent host environments" 

A vector- bo me pathogen 
is transmitted by invertebrate 
hosts like ticks and mosquitos 
The bacteria live inside the In- 
vertebrate and then are txans 
mitted to vertebrae like dogs, 
cattle and humans, Ganta said. 

Ehrlichia chaffeensis was 
discovered first in 1987 as a 
human pathogen, Ganta said 
About 300-500 cases were diag 
nosed each year after the initial 
diagnosis, but those cases only 
represent the reported cases, he 
said 

Ganta said survey research 
in Missouri and Tennessee sug- 
gests lhat as many as 50,000 
U.S. cases arise each year It can 
kill about 3 percent of ihose- in- 
fected: elderly, children and 
those with compromised im 
mune systems can be infected 
severely, Ganta said 

"Not all of the cases are re 
ported because most of the clin- 
ical symptoms of the disease are 
very similar to a typical viral in 
fee tk m," he said. "So people of- 
ten don't know they have this 
particular pathogen infection," 

Before the discovery of Eh- 
rlichia chaffeensis in I9tt7, there 



were similar pathogens in ani- 
mals like dogs and cattle, Gan- 
ta said. Because these patho- 
gens can cause infection in 
humans as well, funding agen- 
cies' interest has increased, he 
said. 

"But the bottom line is 
thai we still have a lot to learn 
and more research needs to be 
done." Ganta said 

Ganta has researched vec 
tor-borne pathogens - his ma 
jor focus - since 1990. He ini- 
tially started his research on an- 
other animal pathogen called 
babesia. which ticks transmit to 
cattle He also has researched 
malaria, a vector-borne patho 
gen from mosquitos to hu 
mans. 

That was the driving force 
initially." Ganta said "1 was in 
terested in human infections 
transmmeil 

Ganta received his doctor- 
ate in biochemistry from All In- 
dia Institute of Medical Science 
in 1987 Molecular biology is a 
branch of biochemistry where 
Ganta said he expanded his re- 
search strengths 

During the last five years, 
Ganta s research team has 
worked with a different feder- 
al grant in collaboration with 
Keith Chapes, professor of bi- 
ology The grant also totaled 
about $1.8 million from the Na- 
iioiuiI Institutes of Health 

Research with the first 
grant is ongoing, and Gan- 
ta said researchers plan to ap- 
proach federal agents for addi- 
tional funding. 

During tru current five- 
year study, four graduate stu- 
dents, three postdoctoral stu- 
dents and two microbiologists 
will conduct research. 



"This is a vehicle by which 
I can train several graduate stu 
dents and the scientists," Ganta 
said. "We are developing a fu- 
ture force of scientists, so thai 
means we are contributing not 
just for this project but for the 
professional development of a 
number of students and scion 
lists" 

Kendra Siebert, doctor- 
al student in genetics and mo- 
lecular biology, is developing a 
Iransposo n -based element sys- 
tem Transposon is a segment 
of DNA that is capable of in- 
serting copies of itself into oth- 
er DNA sites within the same 
cell, according to the Random 
House Unabridged Dictionary. 

Wilh her particular re- 
search focus, Siebert said she 
aims to identify within the bac 
leria what gives them the ability 
to adapt and survive within dif- 
ferent host environments 

Using a broad approach 
and genetic protein blueprint. 
Siebert said she wants to find 
how the bacteria are able to 
survive Ganta said if Siebert's 
research makes a mutation, it 
failed to make one of the func- 
tional proteins, which means 
that Ihe bacteria no longer 
grows in the ticks. 

' Vim can have a mutation 
that will grow in one of the cell 
backgrounds, but it won't grow 
in another," Siebert said. 

Siebert's research uses a 
random process to find the nec- 
essary proteins She said the 
proteins can be used as a mech- 
anism to stop growths in their 
life cycles. 

I'm still in the initial stag- 
es of trying to get the system 
to work." she said. "1 haven't 
found any mutations yet " 



Women | Cats impress Colorado 
coach with traits of Top-25 team 



Congress shall make no law respecting an 
estahlishmen! of religion, or prohibiting the free 
exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of 
Speech, or of the preSS; or the right of the 
people peaceably to assemble, and to petition 
the Government for a redress of grievances. 

First Amendment 

U.S. CONSTITUTION 



artsas State 
Jnlverstfy 

Campus 

Phone 

Book 



inKeazlel03 

Mon -Hi 8 am -5 p m 



Continued from Pige 6 

triple-double, but you didn't 
get ihe feeling she was demu 
nating ihe game" 

Before Saturday's game. 
Dietz was honored as the 
33rd player in Wildcat wom- 
en's basketball history to re- 
cord 1,000 points in a K 
State uniform Dietz said 
the victory over the Bulla 
loes was a little bit sweeter 
for her, not only because it 
was her inaugural game af- 
ter passing the 1,000 career 
points barrier, but because 
she is also a native of Boul- 
der, Colo 

"No matter who it is, 
we just keep fighting," Dietz 



said "ll feels great to beat 
them since it was Ihe school 
1 grew up rooting for, but it 
was extra special because my 
family was able to be here" 

The K State women are 
on a seven -game winning 
streak and have started Big 
12 Conference play 4-0 for 
the first lime since the 2003- 
04 campaign, a season in 
which they went 14-2 in con- 
ference play- 
Colorado coach Kathy 
MeConnell Miller said she 
hasn't seen all the top learns 
in the country, but based on 
the Wildcats* performance 
in Saturday's game, she said 
she has a strong opinion on 
where K State stands com- 



pared to the best in Ihe na- 
tion 

"KSU has the character 
istics of a Top-25 team," Mc- 
Conncll-Miller said "If you 
can go 4-0 in ihis league, you 
should be a Top-25 team " 

K State is off until 
Wednesday when the Wild- 
cats are host to Iowa State 
and look to go 5-0 in Ihe 
conference. The Cyclones 
raise big concerns for Patter 
son though they have been 
decimated by injuries so far 
this year 

"They are seasoned com- 
petitors." Patterson said "It 
doesn't matter who's on the 
roster or who they lose - it's 
take one out, plug one in" 



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PAGES 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2008 



STRIKE | Lack of new TV material 
becoming old for strike supporters 



Continued from Ptq* 10 

"The negotiations did 
not break down over new 
media issues." according to 
the AMPTP statement "In- 
stead, the negotiations broke 
down primarily over one of 
the must old fashioned is- 
sues of all; The desire of 
the WGA's organizers to in 
crease their own power and 
prestige by expanding the ju- 
risdiction of the union over 
reality television and ani- 
mation writers. These juris 
dictional expansion efforts 
have very little to do with 
the concerns of the working 
writers who are on strike" 

The WGA strike has 
cost writers more than $220 
million as of Monday af- 
ternoon, according to the 
AMPTP's Web site The es- 
timated losses are based on 
data that WGA West sup- 
plied on initial compensa- 
tion paid to its members in 
2006, according to the Web 
site 

The AMPTP Web site 
also estimates more than 



$380 million in wages lost 
for Los Angeles Interna 
initial Alliance of Theatri- 
cal Stage Employees crew 
members as of Monday af- 
ternoon. The crew members' 
losses are estimated from 
an analysis of contributions 
to Motion Picture Industry 
Pension and Health Plans, 
according to the Web site 

"We aren't replaceable," 
Roscnbaum said. "We have 
an innate talent and gift; you 
can't leach people what we 
do We're the creators of the 
product" 

VIEWERS RESPOND 

1 cm Kichards. fresh- 
man in life sciences and 
criminology, said the strike 
has affected her favorite TV 
shows like "Chuck," "Private 
Practice," "Jericho," "Grey's 
Anatomy" and "Friday Night 
Lights" 

Kichards, who supports 
the writers' strike, said peo 
pie should triform them 
selves about the writers' 
strike because Internet TV is 
commonplace 



The networks get most 
of the money from the shows 
that air, and the writers real- 
ly don't gel a lot of public! 
ty for their work," she said 
"With TV going toward the 
Internet these days, they 
should be getting paid for 
their jobs, which right now 
they're not There's no show 
without the writers" 

Elizabeth Tresemer, 15, 
started "Against the Writer's 
Strike" at www.freewebs. 
com/againstthestrike on 
|an 9 to collect signatures 
and letters to send to CBS 
While she supports the writ- 
ers. Tresemer said she thinks 
the strike has gone too far. 

"Of course they need 
to get their voices out, but I 
think they could have found 
a better way to get their 
opinions out." said Tresemer, 
a Stockport, Ohio, resident 
"We just want our entertain- 
ment back I've heard so 
many people say that they're 
tired of the reruns People 
are getting discouraged that 
the seasons wouldn't be able 
to hnish up" 



Men | Coach Martin attributes fans 
with encouraging team toward win 



Continued from Paof- 6 

they've got a road win They'll 
be a factor in the Big 12 
They'll be in the top ol the 
league down the stretch." 

K-State s 2 Big 12 re 
cord is the ' first time the 
Wildcats have gone undefeat- 
ed through two league games 
since the inception of the 
conference in 1996, It's the 
first time K-State has been 
2-0 in conference play since 
1993. when K-State was part 
of the Big Eight Conference 
Martin said the sold out 
crowd of 12.528 really affect- 
ed the game down the stretch 
during the second half. 

"I've been at Louisville 
I've been at Syracuse," Mar- 
tin said, "These are schools 
that lead the country in at- 
tendance year in and year 
out. If there are better fans 
in the country over ours. I 
haven't been in that arena " 



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The Office of Student Activities and Services offers 



FREE LEGAL SERVICES FOR STUDENTS 


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Student Legal Services Attorney: 

SARAH BARR 

765-532-6541 

Call no* 'or an appomtmeni 


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kansas state sororities 



come find out what we're about. 

lake a look into k-state's award-winning greek community as the panhellenic 

sororities begin spring open recruitment on January 27. its tree, easy and a 

chance to meet members from each of k-state's 11 NPC sororities. 



information sessions 

tuesday, jan. 22 & thursday, jan 24 
in union 213 at 10a.m. 8. 2p.m. 

Wednesday, jan. 23 
in derby dining center room 133 at noon & 
in kramer dining center room 120 at 8 p.m. 

open house 

shuttle will run from goodnow loop & ford hall 
to chapter houses 1 -4p.m. 

register online at www.k-slate.edu/greek 



questions? 

greek V.-JV state edu I 785/532.5546 



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CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 




f u ill. ii ii Board I Housing Real Estate 




LEARN TO Fit' K- Slate 
Hying Club has five air- 
planch and lowest rates 
Csll 785776-1744. ww*- 
Hsu sou* sic 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance *8 14 assures ev- 
ery parson equal oppor- 
tunity In housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count ol race, tea, famil- 
ial status, military sta- 
tus disability religion. 
eye. color, national ori- 
gin or enceatry. Viola- 
tions should be re- 
ported (o the Director of 
Human Resource* at 
City Hall. 78S-M72440 



MA MM ATT AN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 assure* ev- 
ery parson equal oppor- 
tunity in housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count of race, sei, famil- 
ial status, military sta- 
tue, dlsstolllty. religion, 
age. color, nation el ori- 
gin or ancestry. Viola- 
tion a should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Humen Resources at 
City Hall. 7»5.So?.244Q 



A VERY r«> 

room Cloae to campus 

and Aggieville Mew paint, 

carpet and appliances 

Available now' No pets. 

785-336-1124 



APPLY ONLINE 1 One 10 
four-bedroom apartments, 
studios and lofts available 
January or Augusl 2006 
Visit us si housing! -state - 
edu ot call 785-532-3790 
to set up a tour 

ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartments in new build- 
ings Cloae to campus 
and AggievHIe. Available 
June and Augusl 2008 
No pets Call John al 785- 
313-7473. 

ONE -BEDROOM COZY 
apartment, on* block from 
campus $500/ month, in- 
cludes utilities Call 785 
770-0491 



NOW LEASING 

run rALL 



Lhtrp 2 Bedroom Apts 

(VhtiMxnoK 



Open Saturday tO-3 

537-9064 

raw. h i Hi westa nrjrertlal com 



AVAILABLE NEXT school 
year Three to eight-bed- 
room nouses Alt have full 
kitchen washer' dryer, 
central sir Call now tor 
beat selection www lore- 
mostpropertycom 785- 
539-4641 



LAflQI FOUR-BED- 

ROOM, iwq bathroom, 
carpeted rec room Near 
Aggieviilej campus, cen- 
tral air, waaherr dryer, drs- 



M«MNT 



Kan sas State 

CiHJ£(ilA\ 
HI K.-.l/i. 

I Ti'i iVai'.'.'.'W 




Available new 

terms negotiable 785-317- 

5488 



ONE. TWO three, tour. 
live, and sin-bedroom 
apartments end houses 
svlthkl for June and Au- 
gust 785-539-8295 



'COMPLETE LIST ol 
houses dose to campus 
tor sale lerrylimtjock 
erdl ta ecean d n ic tiol s co m 
785-317-7713 Comer- 
aton* Realty 

ONE. TWO. three, and 
tout-bedroom houses 

Close to campus/ also 
wastslde Available kmme 
distely No pets 785-539 
1975 or 785 313-8296 

THREE/ FOUR-BED- 

ROOM, upoatad brick 
ranch home Neat to KSU 
Stadium. 1 137.000 Can 
785-539-6751 



AVAILABLE FEBRUARY 
1. Four-bedroom, two 
bathroom. 1 300 square 
feet in RodBuri Estates 
Next to pool S80O' month 
plus deposit 785-304- 
0137 





1999 OAKWOOD three 
bedroom, two-bath, walk- 
in closets, garden tub. 
shad Located Hi Walnut 
Grove 18.000 or best oi- 
ler Call 785-317-4689 

FOR SALE 1995 Liberty 
mobile home 16«76, two- 
bedroom. two bath with 
shed 115.000 7B5-4B4- 
8484 Rye mses east ol 



FOR SALE Beautiful two- 
btrjroom «.« baih, 14a 
65 mobile home, two car 
Carport, partially fur- 
nished, garden tub. as ap- 
pliances, large shad and 
deck Possible owner fi- 
nancing, SI 0.500 Walnut 
Grove (786 ( -565 2483 

WALNUT OROVE 2005 
Clayton Mobile Home 
Three bedroom, two bath , 
All appliances, shed, and 
deck 785-3134560 



Need a 
roommate? 



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i 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 

785-532-6555 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 9 



1 1 i i 
-I |i 



ii 1 1 i i 



1 1 1 1 



■ in ii 



u u s: uj. " :: 




LET'S RENT 



ffent-Puplwes 



NICE DUPLEX M6 V.I. 
lis*, (our-bwlmom. two 
nam, a" appliances, 
washer' drysr. August 1 
SI .080/ montti 785-293- 
5197 



Rent-Housei 



Rmt-Hou* i 



AVAILABLE JUNE: Ona, NEXT TO campus. Avail- 
three, tout, and live -tied- able now, June and Au- 
room houses Close (o gust One. rwo. three, 
campus Reserve now lor lour, live, an. and rime- 



besl seteclion 785-539- bedrooms. Apartments, dryer. August 1 Mo pels 



ffenf-Housti 



NICE BfllTTNAV Rtdg* 
Townhome tour -bed- 

room two and x/i bath, 
all appliances, washer* 



3672 Local landlord 



houses, and mutlipleiies 
No pels 785-537-7050. 




month 785-293- 



THREE. FOUR, and live- 
bedrooms Didn't get the 
house you wanted last 
year 7 The good ones go 
last Call TW-MI-OeM. 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted as soon as possi- 
ble 1 One btock from cam- 
pus 1 Vbu will have your 
nwn bedroom and own lull 
bathroom I With washer. 1 
dryer, dishwasher, and 
• replace Water and trash 
paid for 1 H interested call 
Cami at 78S-747-67il2 or 
email me ci|8luu edu 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share house 
win female and male 
$300' month Utilities 
raid Call 785-537-4947 

MALE ROOMMATb 

wanted House three 
blocks horn campus 
$325 00 plus one-fourth ol 
utilities. Call 620-228- 
1345 

NEED ONE clean lam ale 
roommate three-bedroom 
apartment 1225 Ratone 
across street from cam- 
pus $270' month plus utili- 
ties No smoking/ pets 
785-840-8094 or 620-492- 
3191 

ROOM FOR flam Uriiver 
sity Gardens Two-bed- 
room' two bath Share 
with male grad student 
Rem is $280 plus utilities 
Contact ma at maryehhsli- 
nasandnsrSyahoo.com 
ui 913-620-0579. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
Nice, spacious three-bee- 
room house S350' month 
plus bills Available imme- 
diately Con 620-664-7696 
THREE FEMALE interna- 
tional graduate students 
looking tor roommate at 
university Crossing www.- 
ucmanhattan.com Call 
?\ 2-261-7877 or e-mail 
' <jppmeiis5a#gmail com . 




Employment Careers 




THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verity the financial po- 
tential ot advertise- 
ments In the Employ- 
ment/ Career classifica- 
tion. Readers are ad- 
vised lo approach any 
such business opportu- 
nity with reasonable cau- 
tion. The Co legion 
urges our readers lo 
contact the Better Busi- 
ness Bureau, 501 SE Jet- 
terson, Topeka. K$ 
66607-1 190. 785-232- 
0454. 

X well SSKn3 pS 

tesslonal landscaping 
company la seeking a reli- 
able individual lor lull- time 
grnploymen! In their land- 
scape insulation division 
Pnor landscape or term 
experience preferred 
Above average wages 
commensurate with expe- 
rience and ability Benefits 
include mafor medical, 
paid leave and 401 k. Ap- 
ply in person at 11524 
Landscape Ln , St 
George. KS 86635 765- 
■194-2418 or 785-776 
0397 

ACCOUNTANT/ CFO: 
Due to our continued 
growth. CrsncPlus the na- 
tion's leading provider ol 
CHy. County, and School 
websites, has an opening 
tor a full-time accountant. 
This career position re- 
quires ths ability lo handle 
multiple tasks and prion ■ 
lias while maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude. Accountrig experi- 
ence is required. 
Peachtree eapanenca pre- 
ferred Competitive pay 
plus benefits including 
Health. Dental. Paid Holi- 
days, Paid Vocation and 
401 K. Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or Tent for- 
mat to; 
ioba®ctv(Cpius com 




ACCOUNTING CLERK 
part-time: with USD 383 
Business Office ST 00 per 
hour Twenty hours per 
week dunng school year. 
lull-time summer hours 
High school graduate or 
equivalent, computer 

skills including experience 
with Excel, working know! 
edge ot office procedures 
and equipment, basic ac- 
counting skills. Job de- 
scription available Appli- 
cations accepted until po- 
sition is filled Apply to 
Manhanan-Ogden USD 
363. 2031 Poynli Ave, 
Manhattan. KS 66502 
78S-S87-2000 Equal Op- 
portunrty Employer 

ADMISSIONS REPRE 
SENTATIVE Kansas 

State University is recruit- 
ing lor at least one and 
possibly several positions 
ot Admissions Represen- 
tative. These individuals 
ere responsible lor Ihe oe- 
velopmem and implemen- 
tation ot an effective stu- 
dent recruitment program 
within a specific geo- 
graphic region. The ma(or 
responsibilities include 
Coordinating strategy and 
resource people for Ihe re- 
gion, serving as Ihe pri- 
mary recruitment repre- 
sentative, developing and 
maintaining service reit- 
tlonatilps with high 
schools and community 
colleges, attending major 
community events, and co- 
ordinating efforts tor the 
region with K-Slale faculty 
and stall Oualilicalions in- 
clude a recenl K -State 
bachelor's degree, lamtl- 
•anty and excitement lor K- 
State, demonstrated aca- 
demic success and stu- 
dent involvement' leader- 
ship skills in student 
groups and organ ued Irv- 
ing; strong communication 
skills (oral' written), strong 
social skills lor a variety Of 
situations; ability to work 
independently. overall 
high energy level and en 
thuslasm, willingness to 
travel extensively; and a 
valid driver s license At 
least one successful can- 
didate should have native 
or neat-nellve Spanish 
language proficiency One 
admissions representative 
will be located in Dallas 
Texas, and represent the 
university m the state ol 
Texas Applicants wanting 
to be considered tor the 
Texas admissions repre- 
sentative position should 
indicate so in their letter ot 
application Position will 
start July 1. 2008. and 
pay $30,500 lor twelve 
months Candidate should 
send a letter ol applica- 
tion resume, transcript (s). 
and the names and phone 
numbers ol 111 roe refer - 
ences to: Search Commit- 
tee, New Studeni Ser- 
vices, Kansas Slate Uni- 
versity. 1 22 Anderson 
Hall. Manhattan, KS 
66506 Application dead- 
line is January 25. 2006 
Kansas Stale Unrverarty is 
an Equal Opportunity Em 
pioyer and actively seeks 
diversity among its em- 
ployees Paid for by 
Kansas Stale University 

APPOINTMENT SET- 

TER: CivicPlus is trie na- 
tions leading provider ol 
City County and School 
websites We have full 
and part limn positions In 
Manhattan with significant 
income potential lot the 
right individual This posi- 
tion involves calling polen< 
tial clients to setup wetn- 
nai appointments Pay is 
$10 hour plus $40 for 
each webinai appoint- 
ment you setup Full lime 
benelits Include Health. 
Dental, Paid Holidays. 
Paid Vacation and 401 K 
matching Emai resume 
in Microsoft Word or Texl 
format to 
jobs® c ivicplus com 

ASSISTANT TENNIS 

COACH. Eisenhower Mid- 
dle School Salary set by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spring season Accepting 
resumes ot letters with 
qualifications until position 
Is tilled. Apply lo Msnhat- 
tan-Ogden USD 383, 
2031 PoynU Ave, Manhai 
tan, KS 86502 785-687 ■ 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

BARTENDING 1 WOO A 
day potential NO experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 1 800-986- 
6520 axt 144. 



BILLING COORDINA- 
TOR: Due to our contin- 
ued growth Civic Plus, the 
nation's leading provider 
ol Crly. County, and 
School websites, has an 
opening lor a lull lime 
Billing Coordinator This 
exciting opportunity re- 
quires the ability lo handle 
multiple tasks and pnon 
ties while maintaining a 
positive and energetic alti- 
tude. Competitive pay 
plus benefits including 
Health. Dental. Paid Holi- 
days. Paid Vocation and 
40 IK Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or Text tor- 
mat to: 

topa@civicpluB com . 

CHIPDTLE- WORK at a 
place where you actually 
want to eel the foodl 
Chipotle is now luring at 
positions Free load, den- 
ote hours Apply 1 p m to 
5 p.ni . Monday through 
Friday 785-587-6029 

COMPUTER PROGRAM 
MERS warned lor posi 
lions In the Knowledge 
Discovery in Databases 
Research group at K- 
State Applicants should 
be responsible, diligent 
and creative, and should 
be familiar with C# or 
Java, or have Ihe ability to 
learn Pay is commensu- 
rate with experience, all 
grades are encouraged lo 
apply Cat 785-341 1599 
or send resume to Wisufil- 
cis ksu.edu 

DAYCARE NEEDED Iw 
two girts, 4 years and 8 
months ot age Couple 
hours a day and soma 
evenings, please have ret 
arences Contact Amy at 
785-410-5718 or email 
me at amy-pics1®oox ■ 
net 

DERBY DINING Center 
Openings m sanitation 
and lood production de- 
partments. Starling at 
$6 75' hour. Flexible 
hours Apply at Derby 129 

FARM WORKER Cattle, 
gram operation experi- 
ence Call 785-456-3090 
or 785-456-7215 after 7p. 

m. 

FULLTIME AND part- 
time Porter needed Must 
have valid driver's license 
and clean driving record 
See Eddie at Schram 
Chrysler Dodge 3100 An- 
derson. 

FULL-TIME CLERK posi- 
tions available Motorcy- 
cling background a plus 
Win tram Apply '" parson 
al Brooks Yamaha. 8070 
East Highway 24. Manhat- 
tan. KS 



GRAPHIC DESIGN: CMc- 
Plus, a Manhattan based 
company and the leader 
in government websites, 
is seeking full-time and 
contract graphic design- 
era. No HTML experience 
is necessary but must be 
proficient In Photoshop. 
An understanding ol 
Flash. Adobe Illustrator, 
and Microsoft Word is 
haiplul bul not required 
Must be able to manage 
multiple protects simulia- 
neously m a last-paced 
environment Full-time 

benelits include health, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 40t(k) 
matching Email resume 
and design samples to 
tobsi»avtcpius com 

GREAT JOB for Out- 
doorsy People! Kaw Val 
ley Greenhouses is look- 
ing lor help (his growing 
season We are interested 
m part or lull -time sched- 
ules tor the second 
somester. For more infor- 
mation contact human re- 
sources at kvgemploymen- 
l9yahoo.com or 776- 
8585 To apply m person 
go to 360 Zeandale Rd 
Manhattan, Monday- Fn- 
day 8a m - 4pm. 

HEAD TENNIS COACH. 
Elsenhower Middle 

School Salary set by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spring season Accepting 
resumes or letters with 
qualifications until position 
is tilled Apply to Manhai- 
tan-Ogden USD 363, 
2031 Poynur Ave. Manhai 
tan. KS 66502 785-587- 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

HELP WANTED: KSU 

BEEF CATTLE RE- 
SEARCH CENTER 
CONTACT Garrett al 
gparsons&kau edu or 
785 539-4971 

HOME CHILDCARE 

wanted tor 2. 5 and 7 year 
old DrivaUe and reliable 
cat needed References 
required Contact Lindsey 
at 785-317-2140 or 
lknurse79<#gmall com tor 
more information 

HORTICULTURAL SER- 
VICES Garden Center is 
seeking reliable, moti- 
vated individuals for full- 
time and part-time sea- 
sonal positions in our re- 
tail store Above avenge 
wages commensurate 
with experience and abili- 
ties Apply in person at 
11524 Landscape Ln . SI 
George. KS 66535 785- 
494-2418 or 785-776- 
0397 



HORTICULTURAL SEP. 
VICES Is seeking reliable, 
hardworking individuals 
lor full-time and part-time 
seasonal stall in our pro- 
duction greenhouse Ap- 
ply in person at 11524 
Landscape Ln.. SI 
George, KS 66535. 785- 
494-2418 or 785-776- 
0397 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 
and Landscape Foreman 
need e d. Competitive pay 
and benelns Please con- 
tact Athens Services m- 
c of Topeka. KS 785-232- 
1558 or www athansset- 
irtces.com 

MANHATTAN COUNTRY 
Club has Bag Room' 
Range' Cart staff open 
logs Must be able to UK 
approximately thirty 

pounds overhead Apply 
In person al 1531 North 
10th Street. Lower Level 
Tuesday Friday 8 30a m - 
5pm 

MECHANICALLY IN- 

CLINED student to do 
apartment and upkeep 
beginning immediately 
Flexible hours Variety ol 
work: carpentry, electrical, 
plumbing painting, yard 
work, and general mainte- 
nance Send letter and re- 
sume c/o Student Publica- 
tions. Box 300, Manhattan 
66506 

MOUNTAIN DEW repre- 
sentatives needed. Be a 
leader this spring! Get 
paid to promote a brand 
you love while gaining 
real world experience 
Only two positions are 
available. Go lo www ■ 
repnallon.com/dewcrew 
to apply' 

NEED SOMEONE to help 
clean my house, sixteen 
hours.' week Call Rhonda 
at 785-5377978 tor mier- 




Management 

Are you confident, positive, 
fast pare J and enthusiastic) 

Buftjn Kino, I of ManMlan and Jtinrtion 
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■ Liberal p*d malion plan 

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fin rrwt mfwmanw iWHrnmo ihi. 
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tana 

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TO 4JI MOO nt m 
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n Burger king is seeking high- 
energy people to join our 
ri-.liiir.inl family. 

If you are seeking a povnnn that ran offer 
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and # solid benefit package please «hw 
complete an applnalion We are taxing 
appiln.itKins for all shifts- 

W* Otter 

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■Paid natation program for all stall membeis 
• I II -pro r on.'tiW duty meals 
■ Free uniforms 

•frequent perfontujiwe/ular) evaluations 
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•Retirement program 
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Please apply in Manhattan ,t; 
li?Ktaramieot 1001 Anderson 



I :i 



NOW HIRING Subway 
Work up to 20 tiours a 
week, meals provided 
Day. nignt. and weekend 
shifts needed Will work 
around schedule Pick up 
application al any Sub- 
way, including Ihe Studeni 
Union. 

PROJECT MANAGER: 
CivicPlus has an opening 
in our Manhattan head- 
quarters office for a full 
time Project Manager 
This challenging position 
entails managing multiple 
website redesign projects 
from sta/1 to fmish Posi- 
tion requires attention to 
detail, the ability to man- 
age multiple tasks, prion- 
lies and deadlines, and a 
cheerful attitude training 
is provided BenelrK k> 
duds Health. Dental. Paid 
Holidays. Paid Vacation 
and 401 K matching 
Email resume in lent or 
Word format to 
jobs ©civicplus com 

SECRETARY/ RECEP- 
TIONIST Well organ iiea 
energetic person lor full- 
time position with busy 
non-proln agency Re- 
quires outstanding tele- 
phone and office skills, 
lop notch communication 
abilities and pleasant "can 
do" attitude Two years of- 
fice experience profi- 
ciency in Microsoft Word 
and Excel required. Send 
cover letter, resume and 
three references by Jan- 
uary 24 to Screening 
Committee. North Central- 
Flint Hills Area Agency on 
Aging 401 Houston 
Street Manhattan KS 
66502 Equal Opportunity/ 
Affirmative Action Em- 
■Jmi 



SERVICE COORDINA- 
TOR: Networks Plus has 
an opening in our Manhat- 
tan headquarters office for 
a tuli-time Service Coordi- 
nator This challenging po- 
sition entails taking cus- 
tomer cans, coordinating 
protects and scheduling 
technicians Position ra- 
quires attention to detail . 
the ability to manage multi- 
ple tasks, pnonttes. dead- 
lines, and a cheerful art- 
hide Training Is provided 
Hours are 7 30a m to 5p - 
m Monday through Fn- 
day. Salary plus Health. 
Dental. Paid Holidays. 
Paid Vacation, and 40l(k| 
matching. E-mail resume 
In texl or Word format to 
jobs ® network splus com 

STEEL a PIPE Supply 
Company Inventory Ana- 
lyst Assistant There is an 
immediate opening tor an 
Inventory analyst aaala- 
tant al our corporate ol 
tice Position is reaponsi 
ble lor creating migration 
materials, analyzing and 
rnonajonng SAP software 
processes, and assisting 
in analysis of warehouse 
cycle counting dale Also 
support lor customer ser- 
vice and sales staff Quali- 
fied candidates will have 
basic moth and account- 
ing Work experience in in- 
ventory control a plus 
Two years cotege educa- 
tion prelened Interested 
applicants should submit 
resume to Steel a Pipe 
Supply, Inv Analyst As- 
sist.. PO Box 1688 Man 
rsattan. KS 66505 Equal 
Opportunity Employer 

STEEL ft PIPE SUP- 
PLY COMPANY- Busi- 
ness Analyst There is an 
immediate opening tor a 
Business Analyst at our 
corporate otttea This lull- 
time position is part ol an 
IT Development team, 
whose task is to execute 
projects involving informa- 
tion technology to supply 
added business value 
The Business Analyst po- 
sition is responsible lot de 
veloptng business require- 
ments, testing solutions, 
and training users on 
those solutions Oualilied 
candidates will have excel- 
lent people skills and 
must be detail oriented. 
Two- live years experi- 
ence and' or education in 
Business or related field 
required Knowledge of Mi- 
crosoft Office appbcations 
required Competitive pay 
with excellent benefits in- 
terested applicants should 
e-mail resume and cover 
letter to paulmwspsci. 
com or mail to SPS. Atten- 
tion Man PO Box 1888, 
Manhattan, Kansas 

66505 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



twMaSrJ 



STUDENT PUBLICA- 

TIONS trie has a part- 
time position tor a Macin- 
tosh technician available 
The lech support learn 
maintains about 50 Macin- 
tosh workstations, provid- 
ing software support as 
well as performing gen- 
eral hardware mainte- 
nance Any experience 
with Mac OSX design 
software such as Adobe 
Photoshop. Adobe in De- 
sign, and networking is 
helpful bul not requned 
Pay starts at 5*3 50 per 
hour with the opportunity 
lo advance Must be a full- 
time student al KSU Ap 
plications may be picked 
up in 113 Kedzle or online 
at hitp.wwwksiatecolle 
gian.conVapub'. Down- 
load the second appica 
lion at this link Applica- 
tion deadline is 5 pm. Fri- 
day. February 15. 2008 
Please Include your 
Spring 2008 class schad- 



STUDENT TECHNICIAN 
poaajon opening f 7 00 
hour Hours required 20 
hours/ week when class Is 
In session, 40 hours/ 
week during summer and 
breaks Job description 
Pickup and delivery ol 
computers, printers, ate 
lo various campus loca- 
tions (valid dnvars license 
required), general PC and 
pnntei maintenance and 
repair, general inventory 
and accounting functions 
Prefer red qualifications 
1 si or 2nd year studeni in 
computer electronics, or 
related major, applicants 
with demonstrated me- 
chanical aptitude, com- 
puter maintenance expert 
enee helpful How to ap- 
ply Interested applicants 
should come in person to 
121 East Stadium to till 
out an application Please 
contact Anthony PhUltps 
al Anthony 'ii' ksu.edu with 
any questions about Hie 
position 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT 
position available lor K- 
slala undergraduate stu 
dent with a variety ot 
skills. Must have good In- 
terpersonal and problem 
solving studs Experience 
with PC's and popular soil- 
ware applications such as 
Word Perfect MS Word 
MS Excel. MS Internet Ex- 
plorer. Internet applies 
lions, basic web page edit- 
ing and Windows applica- 
tions desired Must have a 
technical understanding ol 
Microsoft Windows Sum- 
mer avail ability neces- 
sary. Computer Network 
experience prelened Ap- 
plications must be submit 
led el Department ol Com- 
munications IET 211 i Jin 
bergar Hall. 785-532 
8270 Applications will be 
available' accepted until 
January 25. 2008 Please 
attach resume with the ap 
plication 

WILDCArSNEEDJOBS - 
COM PAID survey lakers 
needed in Manhattan 
100°, free to join Click on 
surveys 



WORK AT home, book 
keeping and sales repre- 
sentative You can work 
at home and earn up to 
$3000- S4000 monthly 
Contact It interested E 
mall: Igboclaroiu-nopi net 




GROWING COMPANY 
seeking motlvaied K 
Staler s who wish to earn 
money last working part 
time online Irom home 
www lavidarlca abunza ■ 
com 




Open Marttet 




COMPUTER. WINDOWS. 
Business. Internal and En- 
(attainment CD-ROMS for 
Sale si Discounted 
Prices' visit: www fas 
landeasy convwslker 

Corage/YortJ Sate 



MULTI-FAMILY SALE. 

Manhattan Junior crew 
rowing club Mlcrownve. 
vacuum, furniture, cloth- 
ing, bikes etc Saturday. 
January 26, 8a ,m- i£p.m 
(Bag sale- 10:30a m ) 3015 
Anderson, (nail to Rays 
Apple Market. Plus West 
Shopping Cft+itet.) 



Instead ot this 

random black 

apace, you 

could have 

placed a 

classitied. 



HEY! 

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find yourself 
a good job... 



...and a cool 
gadget in the 
Open Market 
section. 



Call 785 532 6555 




JIMMY JOHN'S 

Gourmut Sub Sandwich Shop 
Now hiring crew members and 
drivers. Flexible scheduling, 
free/discounted meals 
great pay, and a fun 
work environment. 
Apply in person 
today at 1212 Moro 




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Graduating in May in Business 
or Operations Management? 

This position might be just what you're looking for. Start part- 
time this spring and become full-time upon graduation. 
Cushion Seats, Inc is a fast growing local company offering 
seating services to some of the largest Football Stadiums in 
the country. Position requires strong analytical skills, attention 
to detail, great communication skills and a drive for success. If 
you en|oy sports and a fast paced environment, this gob is tor 
you. Check us out online at vvvwv.seatbacks.com Pay is S25K- 

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ARTS I ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



TUESDAY, MNIMRY 22, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Striking a deal 



Guild, producers 
reach tentative 
agreement after 
11 -week strike 



By Adf ia nne DeW**tt 

KANSAS WTKOLliCilAN 

Scott Rosenbaum put 
his pencil down 78 days 
ago 

Rosenbaum, co-exec- 
utive producer ol NBC's 
"Chuck," is one of about 
12,000 members in the 
Writers Guild of Amer 
ica, West and the Writ- 
ers Guild of America. East 
who went on strike and as- 
sumed picket duty on Nov 
5, 2007 

He said writers were 
asked to picket 15 hours 
a week at the strike's start, 
and he now pickets 12 
hours a week No picket- 
ing has taken place on Fri 
days, instead, Rosenbaum 
said Guild and strike-cap 
tain meetings take place 
Writers also were assigned 
to groups of about 1 5 oth- 
er writers and dissent in at 
ed information among one 
another, Rosenbaum said 

"As writers, we're the 
creators of the content," 
Rosenbaum said "What 
we've had to fight for very 
hard over the last 60 years 
is the right to, when some- 
thing is created, we're able 
to share in some piece of 
the profit of it " 

A TENTATIVE 

AGREEMENT 

The Alliance of Mo- 
lion Picture and Television 
Producers and the Direc- 
tors Guild of America re 
leased a joint statement on 
Thursday about a tentative 
agreement 

"Our industry's cre- 
ative talent will now par- 
ticipate financially in every 
emerging area of new me- 
dia," according to a state- 
ment at www.amptp.org. 
"The agreement demon- 
strates beyond any doubt 
that our industry's produc 
ers are willing and able to 




work with I he 
creators of en- 
tertainment content lo es- 
tablish (air and flexible 
rules for this fast-changing 
marketplace" 

The Directors Guild of 
America's tentative agree- 
ment includes wage and 
residual increases, health 
care contributions and 
other provisions affecting 
assistant directors, accord- 
ing lo a fact sheet posted 
Thursday at wwwdgaorg 

The tentative agree- 
ment also addresses ju- 
risdiction over new me- 
dia, including original con- 
tent, paid downloads and 
advertisement-support i ii£ 
streaming The tentative 
agreement's sunset pro- 
vision would allow both 
sides to revisit new media 
when the agreement ex 
pires 

"We did it' wrote 
Thania St )ohn, WGA 
member since 1988, at 
u n t tedh otlyzt'ood blogspat. 
com on Monday "We ac 
complished the impossible 
We got the AMPTP back 
to the table and finally re 
ccived a counterproposal 
to the one we made them 
so many months ago The 
deal they made with the 
DGA is the first true sign of 
negotiation they've shown 



Schmidt | (OlIfGIAh 



since we 
started ask- 
ing them to do so back in 

My" 

A contract with the 
Alliance of Motion Picture 
and Television Producers 
covered the 12,000 WGA 
members After more than 



1988. The five month writ- 
ers" strike, which is the lon- 
gest in history, affected TV 
and movie productions. 

The WGA Negotiat- 
ing Committee released a 
statement on Nov. 4, 2007. 
that said the companies in- 
sisted on the following re 



"We aren't replaceable. We 

have an innate talent and gift; 

you can't teach people what we 

do. We're the creators of the 

product." 

— Scott Rosenbaum 

CO-EXECUTIVE PRODUCER ON NBC'S 'CHUCK' 
AND LOS ANGEtES RESIDENT 



three months of negotia- 
tions thai started m |uly 
2007, ihe strike followed 
a gridlock with writers' in- 
sistence on an increase in 
their residuals payments, 
according to a New York 
Times Nov 2, 2007, article 
The last industrywide 
writers' strike look place in 



garding Contract 2007 ne- 
gotiations: 

- No jurisdiction for 
most of new-media writ 
ing; 

- No economic pro 
posal for the part of new- 
media writing where they 
do propose lo give cov- 
erage; Internet down 



loads at the DVD rate; 

• No residual for 
streaming video of theat- 
rical product; 

- A "promotional" 
proposal that allows them 
to reuse even complete 
movies or TV shows on 
any platform with no re- 
sidual; 

- A "window" of free 
reuse on the Internet 

"Because Ihe Internet 
was not something thai 
really existed in a form 
that people were making 
money off of it during the 
last contract negotiation, 
the writers had nothing in 
writing that said we'd be 
able lo partake in residu- 
als on the Internet or new 
media or have any cre- 
ative rights," Rosenbaum 
said 

According lo a Dec. 
10, 2007, statement on 
AMPTPs Web site at 
www.amptp.org, vari- 
ous WGA spokes peo- 
ple claimed the strike is 
about sharing the revenue 
from new-media markets 

S*e STRIKE Page 7 



PAGE 10 
NEW RELEASES 

CDS 

"Jukebox" - Deluxe Edition by Cat Powet 



"Unfamiliat 
Faces" by 
Mart Costa 



"Oracular 

Spectacular" 
byMGMT 




Til Be Lightning' by liarn Finn 




"ftadiohftxr The OVO Bat Unairthor- ' 
ized by Radtohead 

"Mono: The Sky Remains Ihe Same is 
Fver" by Mono 

"B-Stdes&C-SWfs* by Rancid 



Hey Venus!' 
by Super Furry 
Animals 

"Safe ln«de the 
Day "by Baby 
Dee 



"Ears Will Pop & Eyes Will Blink* by 
Bodies of Water 

"The Modem IP' by The Matinee Club 

"Better Dreams" by The Kennedys 

"JtTbyBiuKoAs 

DVDS 

"lorchwood The Complete First Season" 

"Masterpiece Theatre: Northanger Ab- 
bey* 

"Hawaii 
Ftw-0" The 

Third Season 

"Barney 
Miller The 
Complete 
Second 
Season" 

'The Odd Couple" - The Third Season 

"The GirK Next 
Door"- Season 
I 

"Saw IV" 
(Unrated Wide- 
screen Edition) 

"Banacek" Ihe Second Season 



TR" The 

Complete 
Eighth Season 

"Avatar: 
The last 
Airbender" - 
Book 3: Fire, 
Vol 2 

The Game Plan* 






— Aauion.ion 



(MUSIC REVIEWS 



Leftover 2007 albums provide oasis in first-of-the-year release drought 



Reviews by Mark Si bill* 

The first few months of 
the year often are a depressing 
time for entertainment. The 
awards season is in full swing. 
and studios and record com- 
panies already have released 
any movies or music of any 
worth in hopes they have cre- 
ated enough buzz to garner a 
coveted Golden Globe, Acad- 
emy Award or Grammy 

Even with the absence 
of awards shows because of 
the Writer's Guild of Amer 
lea strike, the release sched- 
ules for January, February and 
March luuk pretty anemic as 
far as new music releases 

Instead of looking to the 
future, I propusc looking to 
the past for some great albums 
from 2007 that barely missed 
my annual Top 10 list 

Here are five albums, in 
no particular order, that de 
serve a second look, and they 
ought to hold yuu over un- 
til the 2008 release schedule 
heats up in the spring 

FEIST, "THE REMINDER" 

Canadian singer-song- 
writer Leslie Feist has made 
a splash in the indie- music 
world with her involvement 
in the in die -rock supergroup 
Broken Social Scene and the 
release of her ambitious 2004 
album. "Let It Die" Howev 
er. Feist began her journey to 
becoming a household name 
with her major label debut, 




The Reminder" An eclec- 
tic journey through the tal- 
ented mind of Feist, the al- 
bum probably is best known 
for the single "1234," which 
was used to advertise a slew of 
fine consumer products But if 
am tOM deserved to be beat- 
en into the ground this year, it 
was this one with its perfectly 
orchestrated instrumentation 
calchy hooks and of course. 
Feist's amazing voice The rest 
of ihe album is just as amaz- 
ing, listen to the piano-driv- 
en "My Moon My Man," the 
bouncy, Nina Si mo ne -sam- 
pling "Sea Lion Woman" and 
the subdued beauty of "Bran- 
dy Alexundcr." 

LCOSOUNDSYSTEM, 
"SOUND OF SILVER" 

Half of the production 
dim known as the DFA and 
the mastermind behind LCD 
Soundsystein, James Murphy 
have been a mainstay on hip 
sters lips and playlists for the 
majority of this decade After 



a number of excellent singles 
and creative remixes, Murphy 
continued to prove his bril- 
liance with his self-titled de- 
bul released in 2005 By mar- 
rying the styles and sounds of 
rotk and dance music, Mur- 
phy has created his second 
masterpiece with "Sound of 
Silver" The album is perfect- 
ly sequenced lo always keep 
the energy high and the party 
bouncing Every song is a win- 
ner, including the Brian Eno- 
inspired opener "Get Innoc- 
uous!," the rollicking, irony- 
filled "North American Scum," 
the touching song about losing 
a loved one, "Someone Great" 
and the coup de grace. "All 
My Friends" about a night- 
long party session reconnect- 
ing with old friends 

M.I.A.,"KALA" 

In 2005, multi-national 
rapper MIA blasted onto t' e 
music scene with her extreme- 
ly hyped debut, "Arular" Mix- 
ing world -music beats with 



her revolutionary politics, 
MIA created an amazing al- 
bum that deserved every good 
word written about it. "Kala," 
her 2007 follow-up, expands 
the sonic palette even further 
MIA recorded around the 
world for this album giving it a 
more diverse, less streamlined 
and more sonically-audacious 
sound From the sampling of 
"Roadrunner" by the Modem 
Lovers for the clattering open- 
er, "Bamboo Banga" to the AB 
BA like synth runs in "Jimmy" 
to using The Clash's "Straight 
to Hell" in "Paper Planes," 
M.I A. never sits still or settles 
on one particular style for very 
long. Such a busy album could 
be head-spinning, but it is held 
together by Ml As charismat- 
ic performance and talented 
delivery. 

MODEST MOUSE, "WE 

WERE DEAD BEFORE THE 
SHIP EVEN SANK" 

After a move lo a major la- 
bel with its last album. "Good 



News for People Who Love 
Bad News," many feared that 
Ihe raucous Modes'. Mouse 
of old would forever be left 
behind in exchange for bet 
ler production values and a 
sound tempered for mass con 
sumption However, as Isaac- 
Brock and the rest of his band 
prove on "We Were Dead," old 
habits die hard The band's ar- 
rangements are its most ma 
turc in its career, and the ad- 
dition of former Smiths guitar- 
ist Johnny Marr fleshes out the 
band's sound, hut Brock lets 
his freak flag fly at full staff on 
nearly every song Though the 
album is too long by a couple 
songs, the band manages to fill 
it with enough gems to make 
it an absolute blast to listen 
to. From the danceable single. 
"Dashboard" to multipart ep- 
ics like "Parting of the Senso- 
ry" and "Spiting Venom" for 
which the band is best known. 
"We Were Dead" is an album 
Modest Mouse fans both old 
and new equally can enjoy. 



PANDA BEAR, "PERSON 
PITCH" 

Panda Bear (aka Noah 
Lennox) is one-quarter of the 
Brooklyn, N.Y. band Animal 
Collective This album, which 
brings to mind an electronics al- 
bum by LSD-fueled Beach Boys, 
contains seven immaculately se- 
quenced songs of spacey, sam- 
ple-filled bliss It would have 
been interesting to have viewed 
the recording process, watching 
Lennox al his laptop careful 
ly compiling samples and loops 
thai run the gamut from serene 
to ecstatic This album is more 
personal than the other albums 
on this list, meaning il sounds 
best on good headphones in the 
comfort of your home, but the 
album hardly sounds closed off 
Each song sounds like it waj 
made especially for the lister? 
er with its meticulously crafted 
sondscapes and Lennox's beau- 
tiful harmonies that sound like 
he is whispering right into your 
ear through a sea of hazy re- 
verb. 



KANSAS 



STATE 



4 




w ww.btitetol Isgia n com 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



Vol. 112 I No. M 




I'hoHi illintrdtiun by JonAlhan Knight | lOl.UOlAN 

A new company expects to offer more than 5,000 digital textbooks for students to boy. Some benefits of e-books is the amount of space it saves in a backpack 
and they cost less. 

Many students prefer printed books to e-books 



By Veronlki Novoselovi 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Hale Library offers plenty of digital books 
and articles, but students still have to buy text- 
books in a store or through a Web site That 
could soon change, though 

CourseSmart is a new company that en 
courages students to buy digital textbooks. 
Students can choose from 2,300 of the most 
widely adopted electronic textbooks, and the 
number will increase in the future, according 
to the company's Web site 

CourseSmart expects to have 5.000 e- 
textbooks offered by many of the higher ed 
ucation publishers by summer 20O8 With e 
texts, students pay less and do not spend time 
in shopping lines or pay shipping fees The 
company said it gives customers not only sav- 
ings, but convenience. Students can use the 
e-text almost like a hard copy - search for a 
word or phrase, put in notes or highlight pas- 
sages 

When students drop a class, they can re- 
turn a book to the bookstore. In the same way, 
a client has an option of canceling a subscrip- 
tion to CourseSmart and getting an immedi- 



ate refund within two weeks of the first sub 
scription, provided they have read or print 
ed less than 20 percent of the CourseSmart 
e textbook, according to the company's Web 
site. 

"Even without any promotion of our Beta 
site, we have thousands of student who bought 
c textbooks from us this past semester," said 
Frank Lyman, CourseSmarl representative. 
"Students like the instant access they can get 
to an e-textbnok, and lots of students told us 
they are sick of lugging around big books In 
addition, CourseSmart e-textbooks have the 
same page numbers as the print editions, so 
professors can give the same assignments 
with the print and digital version." 

Madina Mukhanova, sophomore in eco- 
nomics, said she likes the idea of e texts 

I used to read both kind of books a lot," 
she said "When I'm reading from the screen, 
I switch on music, drink tea and eat cookies, 
so time flies" 

Despite some new opportunities, selling 
digital books is still a small part of the puh 
lishing business 

"There are five or six classic *il K-State 
for which students have an e houk opt inn,' 



said Dan Walter, textbook manager at Var- 
ney's Book Store 

"For example, a general education class. 
Introduction lo Sociology, 90 percent of stu- 
tleiiis decided to read a print version of the 
text lor the class. Walter said "Unless there is 
a good universal device of reading an e-book, 
people will prefer paper. Today, students arc 
used lo using Internet technology and com- 
puii/rs Inn when llii'j need lo studs I'hapier 
7 for a Friday test, most would rather read a 
book in a hurd copy" 

Some K State students have similar opin- 
ions on the matter 

l.ennart Marxen. junior in economics, 
said he prefers "old ways of books" 

■J have to spend a lot of lime in front 
of the screen anyway, and when it comes to 
reading, 1 would like to have a hard copy in 
my hands," Marxen said 

Alex Martinez, sophomure in architec- 
ture, prefers hard copies, too. 

"Even though society has turned digital, 1 
feel that il can be unreliable," Martinez said. 
In I lie time of a power outage, digital books 
IK useless, therefore I (eel the hard cop- 
ies are the most reliable source" 



Law Board 
reviews jail 
expansion^ 

By Deborah Muhwett 

KANSAS SIAI HOI II I, IAN 



The space problem at 
Riley County jail that 
existed might not be an isd 
for the Riley County Police 
Department any more. 

Architect Dan Rowe and 
RCPD Captain Jeff Hoop«r 
gave new law board members 
an update on the idea of ex- 
panding the Riley County loil 
yesterday afternoon 

"They originally took the 
proposal to the law board in 
2004," Hooper said "Due to a 
change of director, they put it 
on hold. Now half of the law- 
board is new and they wanted 
to update them 

Hooper along with RCPD 
Director Bradley Sehoen said 
this will have a positive effect 
on Riley County area 

"There were a good num- 
ber of concerns and they want 
ed to see those addressed," 
Schocn said. "He mentioned 
that some of these concerns 
consisted of parking and com- 
mumcation within the facili- 
ty" 

"This will be a benefit to 
all of Riley County and will 
put the jail in better position," 
Sehoen said It limits contact 
in respect to fights and differ 
cnt levels of contacts within 
inmates" 

County Commissioner 
Alvin Johnson said the vote 
will not occur until the ft 
nal drawing and architectural 
plans have been put together 
and presented He said Tues- 
day was just a debriefing and 
the decision will be made in 
the future 

Hooper and Sehoen from 
RCPD said this is the best de- 
cision for Riley County and 
the concerns and issues will 
be addressed through this 
plan 



Census affects national 
decisions on farming 



Student, professor honored for diversity work 



By Kristin Hodges 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Every five years, a stack of 
papers is sent to houses across 
the country asking farmers and 
ranchers numerous financial 
and production questions. 

While the paperwork can 
seem like a tedious job that 
weighs on those who receive it, 
the information can affect all 
those involved years later 

The Census of Agriculture 
is a count of farms and ranch- 
es and the people that operate 
them, according to the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture Web site 

The census is sent out to 
those that own or operate a 
farm or ranch, which the cen- 
sus defines as a place that has 
St, 000 or more of agricultural 
products produced or sold, or 
would have normally been sold, 
during the census year, accord 
ing to the USDA Web site 

Eldon Thiessen, director of 
Kansas Agricultural Statistics, 
said the information gathered is 
the only source of comprehen- 
sive county data about agricul 
ture 

"The important reason for 
responding is the benefit from 
having that kind of data avail- 
able in an unbiased kind of data 
set so that everyone can use it," 
he said. 

Thiessen said the census 
asks questions related to the 
production activity of a farm for 
the year, the crop production, 
expenses and value of the sales 

"It's really quite compre 
hensivc," he said. "It also asks 
about demographics It's amaz 
ing how many people want lo 
know the answer lo those ques- 
tions." 

Rick Snell, K-State county 
extension agent, said the census 
data is largely used to help or 



ganizations make decisions. He 
also said many legislators re 
view the data lo help make pol- 
icies and analyze trends 

According to the USDA 
Web site, federal, state and lo- 
cal governments, agribusinesses 
and trade associations also use 
the census data 

The 2007 census was mailed 
lo farm and ranch operators on 
Dec 28, 2007. and operators are 
busy calculating their expenses 
and other details for the forms 
that are due Feb. 4 

This year the Kansas Agri- 
cultural Statistics office is aim- 
ing at a 90 percent response rate 
- 1 percent higher than the rate 
from the last census, Thiessen 
said. 

However, getting all of the 
census forms mailed back isn't 
always easy, he said 

"Some people have to be 
encouraged," Thiesssen said 
"The important thing that we 
are trying to stress is the value 
of the census" 

Snell said his job is lo in- 
form the public about the cen- 
sus and remind people to fill it 
out. 

During their work, Snell 
and Thiessen said they encoun- 
ter negativity toward the cen- 
sus. 

"We have folks who are 
not particularly happy to com- 
plete the census," Thiessen said. 
"When they call and want to 
visit about it, our hope is that 
they'll listen to why we do this 
and why we believe it's an im- 
portant thing to do. 

"We can't do this by sit- 
ting in our office. We have got 
to get the input from the farm- 
er A good number is very im- 
portant - a bad number is the 
worst thing that could happen 

S** CENSUS Paq« 10 



By Sheila Ellis 

KANSAS VI All MIL LM. IAN 

Two names were added 
to the list of Irailblazers for di- 
versity at K- St ate Tuesday af- 
ternoon 

The names: Farrell Webb, 
associate professor in fatni 
ly studies and human services 
and Clemente Jaquuz- Herre- 
ra. graduate student in arehi 
lecture 

Webb and Herrera were 
honored at the Commerce 
Bank Presidential Awards for 
Distinguished Services to Mul- 
ticultural Students reception 
at the K Stale Alumni Center 

The award is one of the 
most, if nol (he most signiti 
cant award a student or facul- 
ty member at K-State can re 
eeivc for their efforts to fur 
ther diversity at K-State. said 
Dr Myra Gordon, associate 
provost for diversity and dual 
career and development 

"Dr Webb is one of I he 
most quiet powerful forces be 
hind the scenes," Cordon said 
"He is working in the trenches 
making sure our graduate stu 
dents leave our programs with 
excellent skills in every area - 
he is an unsung hero " 

Several of Webb's present 
and former students were in 
attendance, singing his praises 
of how he inculored them and 
led them down a path of suc- 
MN 

"Whal sets Dr Webb 
apart is all his work with un- 
dergraduates and gradu 
ate students," said Anita Cur 
tez, director of the develop- 
ing scholars program "After 
students graduate, he contin- 
ues lo work with them in their 
graduate programs and tries lo 
see them all the way through." 

Webb is the instructor of 
the Developing Scholars sem- 
inar, a program designed to 
give opportunities to under- 
represented students to panic - 




JonMhin Knlqhi | COLLEGIA N 
Farrell Webb, associate professor of family studies and human services, receives a hug from Wendy 
Ornelai, Associate dean of the College of Architecture, Planning and Design, after Webb was recog- 
nised as the winner of the Commerce Bank Presidential Faculty/Staff Award for Distinguished Services 
to Hi stone ally Under represented Students Tuesday afternoon at the K-State Alumni Center 

able "DSP helped DM real 



ipate in Ljmpus research 

"He sels very high enrxi 
talions lor undergraduates 
when students are working 
with him the) Imd out very 
quJdd] that tiles are working 
at a much higher level than 
their pecrv Curie/ said 

Vera White, recent gr;id 
uale studenl of Webh 
Webb is willing to assist stu- 
dent.-, with any issue. 

lie has an overwhelm 
ing desire to make sure all stu- 
dents are successful" White 
said He does everything in 
his power to equip Lhetn with 
the liiols for success aeadenli 
callyand posi -academic" 

Webb noted during his 
humble acceptance need] 
that he is just doing his job He 
encouraged fatuity 10 spend 
more tune with ItudentS 

"1 teach students il is not 
ok to not do your best," he 
said. "Thai is lust unaccept 



loin taller, president of 
Commerce Bank, said this 
year marks 13 years of collab- 
oration with K- St ate and the 
bank to give the award. 

toller said it is an hon- 
or to be able to present the 
award during K- State's Martin 
Luther King ]i Observance 
Week 

Herrera, the student re 
cipienl was noted for being a 
path maker for minority stu 
dents at K State 

"He tirelessly forges the 
path for those that follow af- 
ter him," Cortez said 

This year, Herrera gained 
attention for being a national 
finalist for the Rhodes Schol- 
arship, one of the most presti- 
gious scholarships in the U.S. 

He is also a member of 
the Develoning Scholars Pro- 
gram a^d was one of Webb's 
students. 



"DSP helped me 
ize that 1 could achieve all my 
goals," Herrera said 

Herrera has his plate full 
being involved in the Nation- 
al Organization of Minority 
Architects (NOMAS), Latino 
fraternity Sigma Lambda Beta 
and serving on various diversi 
ty councils on campus 

"Clemente is an outstand- 
ing student, a true role model 
for all of us and a quintessen- 
tial university citizen " 

David Griffin Sr, asso- 
ciate professor and assistant 
dean for diversity secondary 
education, said the committee 
had lo make a difficult cleei 
sion, but they used four main 
traits to select their winner 
dignity, compassion, leader- 
ship and strength 

"This committee is OIK ■ a 
the most important, yet chal- 
lenging selection committee 
on campus," Griffin said 



PAGE 3 1 CHARTING NEW TERRITORY 



PAGE 5 1 EATING RIGHT 



PAGE 6 1 MEETING RESOLUTIONS 

It's not too Uft ft i 



M^M^M^a^^^^^MM 



a*Mi 



MM! 



PAGE 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



ftaftln J$ooki, ami rfo/>/*5 



181 4 Clafiin Rd. 
www claflinbooks.com 



J. 



Fax: 



(785) 776-3771 
f785J 776-1009 



PUZZLES | EUGENE SHEFFER 



ACROSS 

1 Try the 

in 

4 I'jr y«y 01 

[If'Uny 

8 Cui down 
to m« 

12 Bill s 
partner 

13 Smell 

14 Trevl 
toss. 
SMt 

15 Render 
speech- 
less 

16 Home- 
owners 
expenses 

18 Disney 
deer 

30 Total 

81 Organic 
com- 
pound 

24 Business 
bigwig 

28 And 

32 "Clue" 
weapon 

33 Mimic 

34 Poisonous 
plant 

36 Greek H 

37 Line ol 
lashton? 

39 "Beloved 
author 
Tom 



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modes' 
device 

43 In the 
vicinity 

44 BnJlocom- 
petilor 

46 Forbidden 
SO Message 
runs 
mission 
method 
Si Samovar 
SO Diamond 
Head site 

57 Hebrew 
month 

58 Moment 

59 Support 

60 Nurse's 
trayload 

61 Weeding 
toot 

DOWN 

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is there 

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pi wa 
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mate 

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mine 

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rock 

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or Orbit 

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down 

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50 Broom 
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51 Scull 
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52 Plato's P 

53 Praise lul 
rendition 

54 Mid-June 
honors* 



SAY IT 

MIND READER 

Do you know exactly what Frank Martin is thinking? Have 

something to say about this picture? Write in your comments 

to newi^ipub.kiu.edu and we will pick the best comment to 

post on our Web Site, www.k«ofeco//egion com. 



Joilyn Brown | i (U 1 H.IAN 




THE BLOTTER | ARRESTS IN RILEY COUNTY 











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RWXUMWTI NJ HZ I Ml) CO/ FW 

E U Y H , O CUEODP IWN U P D 

R J 1) U tl QZC J (. W / I) 1)1- Q I' I Y Y I 

WslerdavN OvptiMjuip: WHKN SOMEONE 
CREATES II IICV DOWNY CLOTHING, MIGHT 
ONC KINK TO HIM AS \ SOI1WEAR 
Dl SIGNER? 

1«d.i> s l'r>|ilm|ui|i Clue: N tfi)i)uls I 



The CcJIsgian takes reports oVectty from UV 
Riley County Polite Department. Wheel locks or 
minor traffic violations are not listed because of 
space constraints. 

FRIDAY, IAN. 18 

David Richard Orach, L roiwdvrlle. Kan, at 
5:24 p m for failure to appear Bond was $200. 
Stan Matthew Warner, SIS Mora St., at 4:55 
p m lor driving with a canceled or suspended 
license Bond was $750 
Mark Timothy Mmrtt 1 865 College Heights 
Road, at S: 20 p.m. loi possession of a controlled 
substance or narcotic and possession of an opi- 
ate or narcotic Bond was $ 1 .500 
Jennifer Lynn Trtau, Ogden, Kan, at 6.-0J p m 
lot unlawful possession ol a depressant or nar 
cotlc and driving with a canceled or suspended 
license Bond was $2,250. 
Jalro Contreras Pelade*. ! i 1 5 Anderson Ave. 
at 6: 1 p m lor battery Bond was $5O0 
Michelle Lynn Drywatcr, Ooden. Kan. at 6:1 S 
pm. for theft Bond was $1,000 
Jerry Carol Norton, Ouden Kjn at 8:4$ p.m 
for driving under the influence Bond was $$00 

SATURDAY, JAN. 19 

Brant Nell Mellles, 15 id Harttord Road, at 2:02 
am tor driving under the influence Bond was 
$750. 

Christopher Joseph Roys*, Junction City, at 
21 5 am For driving with a canceled or sus- 
pended license and driving under the influence 
Bond was $1,000 

Eric Randall Benoft K 91 2 Humboldt 51 . at 
2:49 a m for driving under the influence Bond 
was S7S0 

Timothy Paul Pralle, 1 41 3 Legore Lane, at 3:05 
am for unlawful [Xissesslon of a depressant or 
narcotic and driving under the influence Bond 
was $1,500 

Nancy FabMa Ramlrei. 1 209 Bertram! St , at 
928 am lor passing a worthless check Bond 
was $215.93 

Filth Metlnda Morehead, Ogcten. Kan. at 9:32 
a m tor theft and malting false mfomiation. 
Bond was $2,000. 

Christopher Mkhael Gross, 3209 Valleydale 
Drive. at 1 1 : 1 5 am for battery. Bond was $$00 
Sushma Rani Prakash. 3402 Stonehenge 
Drive, at 1 2: 1 5 p.m. for failure to appear. Bond 
was $10 

Nathan L Arthur, WOO Turtle Creek Blvd Lot 
41 S, at 4:35 pm for failure 10 appear Bond was 
$35 

Blake William Lindsay, 321 0vVindq.se Circle, at 
1 1 34 p.m for failure to appear Bond was $ 1 00. 



SUNDAY, JAN. 20 

Aaron James Avery, Westmoreland. Kan. at 
1 2:3 7 am for obstruction of the legal process, 
disorderly conduct and possession of alcohol by 
a minor. Bond was $750 

Jason Scnard Dean, 1 222 Sluemont Ave, 12, at 
1 29 a.m. for resisting arrest, aggravated battery, 
criminal trespass and failure to appear Bond 
was$2.14B 

Alex Jon Ford, 1 56 Marian Hall, at 1 30 am. tor 
driving under the influence Bond was $ 750 
Jeffery Hal Hamilton, 1420 Watson Place. »22. 
at t AS am for driving under the influence 
Bond was $750 

Austin Allen Moms, 1403 Hillcrest, at 2:44 am 
lor driving under the influence Bond was $ 750. 
Erkk Robert VlgnaL fort Riley, at 336 a.m. for 
driving under the influence Bond was $ 1 ,500 
Zachary Joseph Each, for! Riley, at 4am for 
failure to appear Bond was $24S. 
William Dean Leupold Jr. 409 Brookmont 
Drive, at 5:50 p.m for failure to appear. Bond 
was $3,000 

MONDAY, JAN. 21 

Charles Brandon Fuller. 94 1 1 Blue Ridge Road. 
at 1 2.47 a.m. tor driving under the influence 
Bond was $750. 

Richard James Downing Jf„ Junction City, at 
1 : 30 am for fai lure to appear. Bond was $ 1 SB 
Nicholas Smith, Junction City, at 2:35 a.m. for 
driving under the influence. Bond was $ 750. 
Cory Angeto Sampogna. 24 34 Vaughn Drive, at 
247am for driving under the influence. Bond 
was $750 

Sean Mkhael Scott. Fort Riley, at 2*9 a.m. for 
driving under the influence. Bond was $750. 
Joseph Scott Ughtrwr, 2215 College Ave, Apt 
G326, at 9:24 am for failure to appear. Bond 

mm tin 

Nicholas Burton Levendofsky, at 1 -Ob p.m. for 
passing a worthless check Bond was S21 1 .26, 
lason Todd MtoMt, Ogden. Kan., at 4 p.m for 
passing a worthless check. Bond was $500. 
Clifton Mean Rosin, 59 3B Turtle Creek Blvd 
Lot 4, at 5:40 cun. lot driving with a canceled or 
suspended license Bond was $ 750. 
Desian Jarrad Moon, Junction City, at 9 1 5 
pin lor driving with a canceled or suspended 
In ens*. Bond was $750 

TUESDAY, JAN. 22 

Keith Anthony Hddeman, 2707 Allison Ave, 
at )5la,m tor driving with a canceled or sus 
pended license. Bond was $ 1 ,500 
Elton Davon Bail. 609 Marlatt Hall, at 2 a.m. for 
MM H appear Bond was $750 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The Collegian, a student newspaper at Kansas State University, is 
published by Student Publications Inc. It is published weekdays 
during the school year and on Wednesdays during the summer 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan. KS POSTMASTER: Send ad 
dress changes to the circulation desk at Ked/ie 103, Manhattan, KS 
66506-71 67. First copy free, additional copies 35 cents. (USPS 291 
Ojo) CKansas State Collegia n, 200 7 



4* 



THURSDAY'S WEATHER 

PARTLY CLOUDY 
High 1 39' Low | 24° 



THE PLANNER 

CAMPUS BULLETIN BOARD 



Applications for Student 
Alumni Board ar* now 

available at the Alumni 
Center or online at www.lt 
sfdfe.tom/jfodenfs/sfo- 
dentalumnibaord.ospx. An 
information reception will 
be in the Alumni Center at 
4:30 p.m on Tuesday. Feb 
5, for anyone interested in 
learning more about the 
group Applications are 
due at the Alumni Cenier 
by 5 p.m. on Thursday, 
Feb. 7 

The 5th annual Brett 
Cushenberry Memorial 
Bui I riding wilt be at 7 p.m. 
Saturday in Weber Arena. 
Admission for adults is $10, 
SS with a K-State ID and for 



children aged 6 to 1 2, and 
free for children younger 
than 6 years old. 

The KSHSAA baseball 
rules matting will be 

at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. Sat 
Manhattan High School- 
East Campus. The meeting 
is for anyone interested 
in umpiring htgh school 
baseball. Anyone with ques- 
tions can call Brad Hall at 
78S- S39-08 10. 

To place an item in the 
Campus Bulletin, stop by 
kedzie 1 16 and fill out a form 
or email the news editor at 
tottegian&ipiibksu.tdu by 
1 1 a.m. two days before it is 
to run. 



CORRECTIONS 
AND CLARIFICATIONS 

It you see something that should be corrected, call news editor 
Owen Kennedy at 78S-537-6S56ot e mail co«egjan<inputr.!rsu.edo 



ADVERTISING 5.12-6560 



/^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 




Sick of your 

Roommates? 

Find a subleaser by advertising 
in the classifieds. 
Call 785-532-6555, 



All Freshmen with a 3.0 or higher are invited to apply for 

Silver Key Sophomore Honorary. 

Informational meeting January 29" 
S.JO in the Union Forum Hall 

Application* can b* found onlinr at For additional qumioiM email 
k i u . (du i > rl v e r t r y Mrfan I>i Mn . nid I r k sift' k ui r 1 1 n . n i 

Wayn» Stoskopt, waynn^r kur.edu 



SoUhern 




( ill | |,,|X\ 



The Office of Student Activities and Services offers 



Free Consumer & Tenant Advice 



The Consumer and Tenant Affairs Offics 
provides information on landlord/tenant 
rights and responsibilities and aids in the 
resolution of consumer complaints 
regarding products and/or services 
Brochures regarding landlord/tenant and 
consumer issues are also available 



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PIZZARIA 

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KSU/Military II) 

GLUTEN I HI I NZZA SOWAVAILABU 



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Appointments Available Daily 
Call 532-W to make an appointment 



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Do you need your resume reviewed 
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Walk-In Wednesday 




TODAY: Jan 23 
NEXT WED.: Jan. 30 

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i afcoll»gebrenk com/lint i ■ 800.766.2845 



Call for Nominations 

Presidential Award for Excellence 
in Undergraduate Advising 

Students, faculty and staff may submit the 
names of potential nominees for this award 
to department heads or deans. 

Nominations should be submitted as soon as 
possible so that the nominees have adequate 
time to prepare the appropriate materials. 

Deans must provide their nominations to the 
Office of the Provost by March 3, 2008. 

Student input is a valuable part of the 
nomination and selection process, so use 
this opportunity to honor those who have 
served you as an outstanding advisor. 






WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23 f 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 3 



International students adapt to change of scenery in Manhattan 



By Holly Campbell 

KAKSAv STATE COLUQAM 

A few weeks ago, Yeli- 
ta Lopez, graduate student in 
anatomy and physiology, had 
never seen real snow In her 
hometown, Lopez was used 
to average temperatures in 
the 70s. 

Lopez recently traveled 
from Barquisimeto, Venezu- 
ela, tu attend K-State. She 
chose K-Slate on the recom- 
mendation of colleagues and 
professors from her home uni- 
versity, who told her K State 
was a good, affordable school, 
she said. 

Stacey Bailey, a foreign 
student adviser at the Inter- 
national Student Center, said 
about 100 new international 
-.indents arrived in Manhat- 
tan this month to attend K- 
Stale for the spring semester. 

To ease their transition 
to K State, new internatiun- 
il jiudents were given a spe- 
cial orientation before classes 
started, Bailey said. 

Guests from the Regis 
irar's Office, Lafene Health 
Center the English Language 
Program, the Internation- 
l I'lMirdinaiing Council and 
Union Program Council spoke 
to the students A second day 



of orientation included infor- 
mation on banking, health in- 
surance and other important 
topics for new students, Bai- 
ley said. 

Lopez attended the orien- 
tation session and said it was 
helpful However, Lopez said 
she and other international 
students still face some chal- 
lenges living in Manhattan. 

"The problem here is you 
can't live without a car," she 
said "So it's difficult for a 
person like me" 

To get her shopping done, 
Lopez said she bundled up 
against the cold and lined up 
with about two dozen other 
students at |ardine Apartment 
Complex Saturday morning 
before 9 a.m. waiting for a 
shuttle 

The shuttle had to make 
multiple trips to deliver all of 
the waiting students to Wal- 
Mart and Manhattan Interna- 
tional Foods. 

It also picks up students 
at the K-Stale Student Union 
and Moore Hall later in the 
morning, according to the 
shuttle schedule. 

All K State students are 
allowed to use the shuttle ser- 
vice. However, non-student 
spouses and children cannot 
ride 



The shuttle service is 
good, Lopez said, but the time 
period available - the first stu- 
dents are picked up from Wal 
Mart at 10 15 am. - is short 

"You spend a lot of time 
waiting for the shuttle, and 
time is very important," she 
added 

By contrast, the price of 
gas in Venezuela is low, and 
public transportation is so 
plentiful, drivers will even 
fight over who can pick up 
patrons, Lopez said. 

Virendra Landge, grad- 
uate student in food science, 
has been attending K State 
for a year since moving from 
India 

Landge said his adjust- 
ment to K-Stale was not very 
difficult He said he does not 
have a car, but has managed 
to shop and see Manhattan 
sights, like Aggie ville, by rid- 
ing with friends 

Finding the comforts of 
home has been a challenge, 
Lopez said 

She said she has seen 
many Mexican. Asian and 
Indian foods in Manhattan, 
but not many Latin products. 
Landge said over the last year, 
he has been having a harder 
time finding Indian foods in 
Manhattan stores as well 




Joilyn Brawn | < HI lli.lAS 

Nasim Rahman), graduate student in mechanical engineering, is checked out by Analira Heaton. ownei of 
the Manhattan International Foods on Tuttle Oeek Blvd. on Saturday morning, Rahmam, an Iranian student, 
tan errands on the shuttle, which is a service provided to international students 



In her home country, Lo- 
pez said there are some large 
stores like Wal-Mart, but ye' 1 
crally there arc more plan- U) 
shop 



Late in the morning, the 
shuttle, packed full with stu 
dents and their shopping bags. 
dropped Lopez and the cith- 
er riders back at their apart 



mints 

Lies pile I he cold, Lopez 
said she dues enjoy the Kan- 
sas snow 

lis beautiful." she said 



City Commission approves debt, 
development resolutons 5-0 



By Corene Brisendlne 

K^Ss As MATt COLLEGIAN 

Manhattan Cily Commis- 
discussed city debt, an 
intersection project and sup- 
port of an affordable hous- 
ing project last night at City 
Hall 

Commissioners first ad- 
dressed Manhattan's overall 
budget. 

City financial director. 
Ki'mie Hayen alleviated the 
commission's concern when 
he said Manhattan is $80 
million below the debt ceil- 
ing 

Commissioner Bruce 
Snead said several citizens 
have complained about the 
special assessments added to 
(heir taxes when purchasing 
new houses. 

Hayen said he thought 
Uu assessments are the best 
option for the city and its ho- 
meowners 

I have lung said the 

Boated benefit to the city 

using divisions," Hayen 

said. "It is like putting in a 

small shopping mall" 

Hayen also said the spe- 
cial assessments helped the 



home buyer by saving them 
$300 $400 with lower per- 
centage rales offered by the 
city. 

The city charges 2 per- 
cent on the special assess- 
ments over a 20-year period 
verses a standard mortgage 
rate of 18 percent over a 30- 
year period 

All items on the consent 
agenda passed 5-0. 

Commissioners also lis- 
tened to the update from Kob 
Ott, city engineer on the U.S. 
Highway 24, Marlatl Avenue 
intersection project. 

Ott identified four prob 
lems with the current inter- 
section: it has increased traf- 
fic volumes, increased crash 
rates, no pedestrian access 
across Highway 24 and drain- 
age problems. 

Ott discussed five solu- 
tions which will improve the 
intersection. 

These include turning 
lanes, traffic signals, street 
lights, a pedestrian/drainage 
cell and removing the guard- 
rail. 

The Highway 24. Marlatl 
Avenue project passed 5-0. 

For the latid owners los- 



ing property due to expand- 
ing the intersection. Pub- 
lic Works Director Dale 
Houdeshell gave the commis- 
sioners a few options. 

"(The city] might be able 
to give in kind compensa- 
tion as opposed to cash." 
Houdeshell said 

The motion passed 5-0 
for providing just compensa- 
tion to the land owners 

The lasl item on the agen- 
da addressed the support of 
the Manhattan Area Housing 
Partnership. 

"We are Manhattan's 
low-income housing devel- 
oper," said Chris Bailey, Pres 
idem of M AH P 

Bailey said MAHPhoped 
to begin the new housing 
project in August 2008 and 
have it completed by March 
2009 

"Housing in Manhat- 
tan is very expensive," said 
Commissioner Bruce Snead 
"Land is hard to come by" 

Snead said he support- 
ed the efforts of MAHP The 
commission voted 5-0 in fa 
vor of supporting MAHP's 
request for funding from the 
stale 




( No Jager, Car Bombs, Patron, or Red Bull) 



$3.50 Domestic Pitchers 

$2.€o An y Drink 

■*"^" p (No Jager, Car Bi 

$ s. zsCheeseburger Bas kets 

jCome watch KSU at Colorado here on our 
I 7 Big Screens! Tip off at 8pm 



Spring Activities Carnival 




Come visit with more than 115 

student organizations looking for 

new members 

January 24, 2008 

6:00 to 8:00 pm 
K-State Student Union 

Ground and First Floors 



For mora information or to view a list of participating 

organisations visit the OSAS website at 

htlp '/www ksu edu'osas 







Sarah Pavelka, Chapter President 

Danielle Butler, Chapter Life VP 

Allie Ryan, Public Relations VP 

Amanda Caphart, Financial VP 

Aubrey Bamford, Membership VP 

Dee Rodriguez, Programs VP 

Kelsie Mayer, Panhellenic Delegate 

Ashlee Erickson, Recording Secretary ™ 









Got a 






tory m 

i «•>_*«* m „ ore-mail 



Call 532-6556 



collegian@spub.ksu.edu 




■H 



PAGE 4 



OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Lack of achievement 

Gov. Sebelius to give Democratic Party response 
to State of Union Address at the end of the month 



Q 



In front of the whole nation, or at least 
those who care, Kansas Gov Kathleen Sebe 
lius is delivering the Democratic Party re- 
sponse to President Bush's 
final State of the Union 
Address on Ian 28 

Described as an up 
arid-coming star of the 
Democratic Party, Sebe 
lius has received many 
compliments horn her 
Democratic Party col 
leagues 

Prom their Washing- 
ton offices, Senate Major- 
ity Leader Harry Reid, D 
Ni'v . and Speaker of the 
House Nancy Pelosi, D- 
Calif ., said in a joint statement, "[Sebelius'l 
record of accomplishment in Kansas is evi- 
dence of what can be achieved when leaders 
reach across the aisle on behalf of all Ameri 
cans'' 

In the mind of a Democrat. Gov Sebe- 
lius has done a lot to further the party agen 
da during her two consecutive terms, but 
"reaching across the aisle" is not difficult 



BRETT 
KING 



when many of the Republicans in the slate 
government are rolling over and dying. 

The Republican Party in the state of 
Kansas should be embarrassed for allow 
ing her to gel away with all the problems she 
has caused 

Contrary to ihe belief of many Repub- 
licans, including the President of the Unit- 
ed States, small governmenl has been a prin- 
ciple at Ihe pinnacle of conservatism. Our 
state government is growing by leaps and 
bounds; according to the group Americans 
for Prosperity, "Since March 2001, Kansas 
has lost 26,100 private sector jobs and has 
added 15,700 government jobs" 

According to the Kansas City Star on 
|an 15, Kansas GOP Chairman Kris Kobach 
pointed out that in western Kansas, where 
private sector jobs are scarce. 
Gov Sebelius' administration re 
jected the expansion of a coal 
fire power plant that would 
have created 2,400 more 
jobs in the region 

* ^, w ''" 1 * nese numDers 
^^% and examples, the 
Bureau of Labor 



Chiistmi f-ocsbero. | cOU.B.IAM 



and Statistics ranks Kansas near the bottom 
of the United States in the creation of pri- 
vate sector jobs, but No 1 in creating gov- 
ernment jobs Each of these government jobs 
compounds the bureaucracy in this state. 

After rapidly expanding the size of gov- 
iTtinunt in Kansas, Sebelius has done her 
best to increase the lax burden on all Kansas 
citizens According to the Tax Foundation, 
income taxes in ihe state of Kansas are at an 
till lime high 

Barry W Poulson, distinguished schol- 
ar for Americans for Prosperity, wrote in 
his analysis of Kansas tax policy that "from 
2000 to 2004, Kansas' ranking in relative tax 
burdens increased from 22nd to 10th There 
is no' other state in Ihe nation in which Ihe 
lax burden increased as rapidly as Kansas' 
over this period.'' 

Sebelius* name has been popping up 
over the past few years as a potential cabi- 
net member or even vice-presidenlial candi- 
date in the upcoming election; however, her 
name has moved up because of her finan- 
cial backing by many political action com- 
mittees These donors have made her ask 
"How high?" when many of these PACs say 
lump," but the Democratic Party knows she 
can bring in money. 

Achievement means results, but in the 
minds of Sebelius and members of the Dem- 
ocratic Party, leadership and achievement 
musl be a regression to drive this state into 
Ihe ground 

Sebelius will be representing our state 
on a national stage, but hopefully in the days 
following, ihe trouble this stale is in will be 
exposed and true solutions to fix Kansas will 
be revealed 




Bretl Kin; it a tenior 
in political science. 
Plciit send com 
men Is to opinion . 
spub.kiu.tiu. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



THE FOURUM 

(7M) 395-4444 

The Campus Fourum is ihe 

Collegian's anonymous call-in 

system The Fourum is edited to 

eliminate vulgar, racist, obscene 

and libelous comments, The 
comments ate not the opinion 

of the Collegian nor are they 
endorsed by the editorial stall 

Hey, Fourum, what's a Stuni? 

Who cares if the Stuni guy's kryptonite 
is sugar? 

What do I haw to say? 1 hive this to say 
I want to know who the hell the Stuni 
guy is. 

The Stuni guy's a false prophet. 

Oh, the weather outside is frightful But 
the Stuni's so delightful. 

Joe Vossen. I did not feel the spark in 
your article yesterday 

Heart) ledger died? No, Heath Ledger 
can't die He's like God 



For the full Fourum goto 
www.kstatKolltqion. cam. 



Collegian 



Jonathan Garttn 

EDItORINCHKI 

Saltna Straw | mamGikG FWTOIt 

Willow Wllllamiofi | kuhAGIhG EDITOR 

Ow*n Kannady | XEWS till ton 

Hannah Bllck | uh i. Hit F 

Scott Glfard | (0PM mil 

Annatte Liwliu | MUCTIMIDM EDITOR 

Sh»lla€llli|U*ru:,[IHTOR 

AltiPaalt | ihe F.GG1 EDITOK 

Brandon Stalnart | METRO EDITOR 

Kalxy Ho«l | OPIUlONtttlTOR 

Wtnoy Haul) | SKIRTS EDITOR 

Joatielllion |5P0R?SiD(T» 

Nicola Johnston | SPKItl SECTIONS EDITOR 

Ty1« ft. mold! | Ml MANAGER 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

ntwiu&ipub.kw.inlu 

Kedne 103, Manhattan. KS66S06 

DISPLAY ADS (7851 5J2-6S6G 

CLASSIFIED ADS (78SI5J2-6555 

DELIVERY (785} 5J2-6S55 

NEWSROOM (785) 532-6556 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

The Collegian welcomes youi letters to the 
editor They can be submitted by e-mail 
to tetleiiii'iptibMu.ediJ, or in person to 
Kediie 116 Please include youi Full name, 
yeat in school and major, letters should be 
limited to 250 words All submitted letters 
might be edited for length and clarity. 



Voting machines interfere with voting, should be replaced 




It is 2008 and already we, the Ameri- 
can people, are getting ready for a new chap 
ter in the United States' presidential histo- 
ry, For the first lime since 
2000, U.S. voters have fresh 
opportunities in both wings 
for warming the chair in 
the White House Howev- 
er, since the turn of the mil 
lennium, it has become ap- 
parent to many people that 
voting is not the way it 
used to be 

In recent years, with 
technological advanc- 
es, it has become standard 
to use new voting meth- 
ods, namely electronic voting machines. In 
New Hampshire' at the beginning of | a Hilary, 
Democratic candidate Rep Dennis Kucinich, 
D-Ohio, paid a $2,000 fee for a recount' in 
■ the number of votes he received The rea- 
son: Kucinich was concerned about online 
reports alleging discrepancies between hand- 
counted ballots, which favored Sen. Bur nek 
Obama, 13-111., and machine-counted ballots, 
which favored Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y. 

If this was not such a complex subject. 



GRADY 
BOLOING 



I would probably explain it a lot better But 
I'll try either way. 

Clinton's success in New Hampshire 
could be attributed not only to her tear- 
ful performance, but the Diebold voting ma- 
chine, which credited her with more votes. 
In September 2006. computer scientists at 
Princeton University published a sludy Ihat 
examined the vulnerabilities of the Diebold 's 
AceuVote-TS machine On its Web site 
Princeton's Center for Information Technol- 
ogy produced a demonstration video of how 
the machine could steal votes using mali- 
cious software or even a virus - one could 
easily break into the system, install a ma- 
licious memory card, and piece the device 
back together in less than a minute 

Eerie, huh > |ust look at the fallout. 

On Nov 30, 2007, the Houston Chroni 
cle reported how the Republican leadership 
in Wharton County, Texas, decided to return 
to paper ballots for the upcoming primary in 
March. The reason: a local businessman stat- 
ed some stale constitutional amendments he 
voted for "changed before his eyes" on the 
screen of a computerized vol ing machine he 
was using in Boling, Texas 

On Dec 18, 2007, the Rocky Mountain 



News reported Colorado Sec 
retary of State Mike Coff- 
man announced the decerti- 
fication of thousands of these 
machines in 53 counties 

Then, on Dec. 31,2007. 
the Associated Press reported 
officials were sent scrambling 
from California to Florida for 
paper ballots after discover- 
ing "critical flaws in the ac- 
curacy and security" of their 
own Diebold machines. 

If anything, it seems the 
United States needs to wake 
up and go back to the Stone 
Age when it eomes to voting 
- marking an "X" next to the 
candidate's name and call- 
ing it good Since 2000, it has 
been one problem after an- 
other with voting - believe 
me, having lived in West Palm Beach, Fla.. 
during the 2000 election, I can tell you I am 
fed up with hearing the same story for every 
election 

So unless election officials throughout 
the country can find a way to replace these 




Chrirtin* Fortberg | » ULLEGIAN 

faulty machines, I'm staying home on Elec- 
tion Day and watching "South Park " 



Grady Holding is a junior in theater. Please send comment] 
to opinion n ipub.kititdu . 



TO THE POINT 



Students deserve choice between online, physical textbooks 



The days of students 
carrying stacks of books 
and notebooks to class 
and swimming 
in a sea of loose 
paper are com- 
ing to an end. 
The days of 
teachers writing 
an entire lecture 
on a blackboard 
seem to have already 
done so The time of the 



TOM POINT ts an 
editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial boacd 
and written after 
a majority opinion 
is formed This is 
the Collegian's 
official opinion. 



textbook might be the 
next aspect of school 
to turn into a distant 
memory. 

Many stu- 
dents bring a 
laptop com- 
puter to class 
with them so 
they can fol- 
low an instruc- 
tor's PowerPoint slide 
show lecture. If the in- 



structor doesn't use a 
slide show, some stu- 
dents still prefer to type 
their notes on a com- 
puter rather than us- 
ing paper and writing 
them by hand. Students 
now can use their lap- 
tops not only as an all- 
in-one notebook, but as 
an all-in-one textbook 
as well 
Some students can- 



not afford to spend 
hundreds of dollars on 
textbooks every semes 
ter, and for those who 
can, having to shop on- 
line and in a bookstore 
takes time, especially if 
the bookstore is crowd- 
ed. The prospect of e- 
textbooks is good news 
for students who would 
prefer to take a lap- 
top to class instead of a 



backpack, a textbook, a 
notebook and a pencil 
or pen. 

Students should have 
a choice in how to buy 
a textbook, wheth- 
er electronic or paper. 
Some students still pre- 
fer to hold a book in 
their hands and turn a 
page, rather than look- 
ing at a screen and 
clicking the "next" key. 



The best of both worlds 
can co-exist, and they 
should continue to do 
so. 

Students should not 
be required to use only 
one form of a textbook. 
If a student's budget is 
tight, e-textbooks offer 
some relief, and if the 
student chooses to buy 
traditional books, they 
have that right, loo 



■Hi 



■B 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



hS 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



A bite for the road 

Campus nutrition educators offer simple, healthy 
snacks for students to eat between meals on campus 



By Adrianne DeWeese 
KANSAS SlATt OOLLKUN 

Snacks can be delicious, but 
eating between meals is also a 
healthy part of everyday life, said a 
K-State nutrition specialist 

Sandy Procter, Expanded Pood 
and Nutrition Education Program 
coordinator and assistant professor 
of human nutrition, said college stu- 
dents should plan ahead and keep a 
proactive attitude about snacks 

Whole grain foods like torti- 
llas, popcorn and bread make easy 
snacks, Procter said Small vegeta- 
ble trays also can make several days 
of grab- and -go snacks, she said. 

"The more basic foods are go- 
ing to give you flexibility," Procter 
said "They can help you meet hun- 
ger pangs for foods that are salty" 

Because college students of- 
ten lead busy lifestyles, Procter said 
students should prepare snacks the 
night before they plan to eat them 
Simple foods like whole-grain cere 
at and skim milk make ideal snacks 
for those on the go, she said 

"Snacks aren't a bad thing," 
Procter said. "Portion control is im- 
portant, but (snacks] aren't bad. 
Snacks help us get to that next meal 
without overeating at that next 
meal" 

Snacks should come from the 
first three sections of MyPyramid 
- grains, vegetables and fruits, said 
Kathy Walsten. nutrition educator 
with K- State Research and Exten- 
sion's Family Nutrition Program. 

She also said snacks should in- 



corporate at least two different pyr- 
amid sections. 

"Snacking really should be part 
of what you eat all day long," Wal- 
sten said. "They can lake the edge 
off hunger" 

College students often need 
energy from snacks like protein 
bars during the day between class- 
es, said Stephanie Davis. Sensible 
Nutrition and Body Image Choic- 
es (SNAC) member 

"My theory is eat when you 
are hungry and stop when you art- 
ful)," Davis, senior in family studies 
and human services and Spanish 
said. "I think the key is eat in mud 
eration and snack in moderation. 
If you snack throughout the day. I 
think it helps you know your body 
better You don't gorge during 
dinner, but you aren't emp 
ly either." 

K-Stale Research 
and Extension's Fam- 
ily Nutrition Program 
;ind Kids a Cook in' of- 
fer recipes designed for 
9 to 11 -year- olds that 
college students also can 
make on the go. Walslen 
said 

For more information on the 
following recipes, complete nutri- 
tional information and addition 
al recipes, visit wwu>,hidsacookin 
hsu.edu. Pood safety is important 
during food preparation and con- 
sumption, Walsten said 

She said students should al- 
ways wash their hands before pre- 
paring and eating their snacks 




BANANA WRAPS 
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KING'S KITCHEN 




Ledger 



PAGES 



ENTERTAINMENT BRIEFS 
LEDGER FOUND DEAD 

NEW YORK (CNN) - Ac- 
tor Heath Ledger was found 
dead Tuesday of a possible drug 
overdose in a 
Lower Man- 
hattan apart- 
ment, the 
New York Po- 
lice Depart- 
ment said 

The 
Academy 
Award nom- 
inated actor 
was 28. 

"Pills were found in the vi- 
cinity of the bed." police spokes 
man Paul Browne told CNN 

"This is being looked at as 
a possible overdose, but that is 
not confirmed yet " 

Ledger was unresponsive 
when he was found by a house- 
keeper who had gone to wake 
him for an appoinUnent with 
a masseuse in the Soho apart- 
ment, Browne said 

He was declared dead at 
about 3 30 p in . Browne said 

In 2005, the actor played 
Ennis Del Mar in "Brokeback 
Mountain," about two cowboys 
who had a secret relationship. 

The role earned him the 
Oscar nomination. 

BILLBOARD RATINGS 



1 Abe la Keys 
"As I Am* 




4 MaryJ .Mige 'Growing Pans" 




ITCoMeCdtflafCoca" 

UKrysfoa Coif "lust HI* You 

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M. OwRcpublK "Dicammg Out UMdT 






15 MDeyCyrus Hannah Montana /'(Sound 
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16 Soundtrack "Sweeney Todd: 71* Demon 
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USujartand tnpey Ttie Side 



18 Sara Hamlin LrltleVoKP 



i»0aoghtry 
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20 led 
Zeppelin 

'Mothership' 







Chili recipe provides warm alternative during cold winter months 



Here at the Collegian, I 
have been pegged as only an 
opinion writer over the past 
few years 
Many read- 
ers have 
failed to see 
me as any- 
thing oth- 
er than "that 
opinionat- 
ed guy," but 
few know I 
spend a lot 
of my free 
time devel- 
oping reci- 
pes and cooking 

After a year of petitioning, 




I am happy to announce this is 
the first installment of "King's 
Kitchen," which will be a week- 
ly series of columns on The 
Edge page 

Every Wednesday, my 
hands will leave the keyboard 
behind, fire up my stove, pick 
up my Wusthof and Sabalier 
Au Carbone knives and pres- 
ent some of my classic recipes. 
They will range in complexity, 
but I try to keep cooking sim- 
ple and enjoyable. 

With global warming not 
doing its part, we are stuck 
freezing at the end of January 
After a long day of attending 
classes and walking in and out 



of Ihe cold, students should en- 
joy a hearty, warm meal to take 
lite chill out of their bones. A 
warm bowl of chili can keep a 
person feeling good and keep 
the sheets warm all night. 

A basic essential that ev- 
ery college student needs is a 
slow -cooker or Crock-Pot. Us- 
ing one can help students ful 
low the No. 1 rule in cooking 
chili - slow, low and steady. 

HEARTY CHILI 

-2 pounds ground venison or 

Immburger 

-I package of Williams Chili 

Seasoning 



-2 cans red beany drained 
-2 cans kidney beans, drained 
- 1 white onion, diced thinly 
- ' 4 cup ketchup 
-2 cans diced tomatoes 
-*/* teaspoon cinnamon 
-'■■? teaspoon sugar 
-'<■? teaspoon salt 
- ' 2 teaspoon pepper 
-Tabasco* (optional) 
-mild cheddar {optional} 
soda crackers (optional) 

When it comes to the 
meat. I prefer io use venison 
because it gives a rich flavor, 
but basic ground hamburger is 
■ fine substitute 

To begin, brown the meat 
over medium high heat in 



a large skillet; once meat is 
cooked, drain out grease and 
place in slow cooker Add 
package of chili seasoning, red 
beans, kidney beans, onion, 
ketchup and diced tomatoes. 

Remember not to drain 
the juice from the cans of to- 
matoes because the juice pro 
vides the necessary liquid with- 
out losing the flavor Add in 
salt and pepper and stir ingre- 
dients together in slow-cooker. 

Leave chili to cook in 
slow -cooker on the low sel- 
ling for seven hours. If timing 
is right, the meal can be ready 
when you come home at night 
from school or work 



Sail, pepper and TabascaV * 
are nothing more than flavor 
enhancers driven by personal 
taste Don't be afraid to lake a 
spoon and try a little bit while 
the chili is simmering and add 
a little of each to fit personal 
preference 

When serving, top with 
cheese and add a side of crack- 
ers, if desired. Keep leftovers 
for up to one week and use to 
make chili dogs, chili cheese 
fries or even chili burgers 



Brett Ktnq is a sewofw political science 
Please send comments to edg** iputiiiu. 






m 



n 



'■?■ 



iM 



■ 



PAGE 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Road win to be valuable 




lOFiithin Knight | i Oil KUAN 



Senior guard Bilk* Young attempts a shot against Texas ASMS Derrick Roland during the 
game Saiurdayai Bramlage Coliseum The Wildcats won 75 S4 and will travel to Boulder, Colo,, 
to face the Buffaloes tonight 



K-State looks to 

stay undefeated in 

conference play 

By Wendy Haun 

KANsAssiMtmtLllilAN 

A team looking to battle back from a I -2 conference 
record will play host to K-Slate at the Coors Events Cen 
ler in Boulder, Colo , tonight 

Colorado (9-8, 12 Big 12 Conference) has had a 
rough beginning in the conference, dropping a game to 
Texas A&M. then falling by two to the University of Tex- 
as, both on the road The team's lone win has been against 
Nebraska in Boulder, when the Buffaloes edged the Com- 
huskers 55-51 . Tip-off for tonight's game will be at 8 p.m. 
onESPNU 

"What opens my eyes is when I see them playing with 
the amount of purpose they are playing with," said coach 
Prank Martin "1 see the incredible amount of growth that 
they have done as a basketball team They're resilient and 
they're doing what they're told to do. and they're playing 
with tremendous passion and togetherness. They're a com- 
pletely different team than they were in November" 

Colorado is led in scoring by senior guard Richard 
Roby. who is averaging 1ft points per contest and six re- 
bounds The Buffaloes' assists leader is senior guard Mar- 
cus Hull, who is dishing almoM four assists to his team 
males per game 

K- Stale (12-1, 2-0 Big 12) is looking to preserve its 
perfect conference record Only two other teams (Kan- 
sas and Baylor) are also perfeel through three conference 
games 

The Wildcats" leading scorer. Michael Beasley, is also 
leading Ihe Big 12 in scoring. Beasley. a freshman forward, 
is averaging 24 points per game, as well as a conference- 
high 12 rebounds per game Freshman forward Bill Walk- 
er is also providing strong contributions for K-State, av 
eraging 1ft points and six rebounds per game. The one- 
two punch of Beasley and Walker is one aspect Colorado 
coach leff Bzdclik is worried abouv 

"Obviously, they're a handful, and they've proven 
that nationwide," Bzdelik said "We're going to have to be 
at our very besl just to have a chance to be competitive 
against those two great talents" 

K-State already has proven it can win on (he road. 
The Wildcats went to Norman, Okla , Jan. 12 and shocked 
Oklahoma, 84-82. With the home teams prevailing often 
this season, the rare road win that K-State has is extreme- 
ly valuable. Martin said. 

"It's nearly impossible to win on the road in this 
league because of die kind of teams, the kind of coaching 
and the kind of preparation the teams have and the ven- 
ues that you play in," he said "When you figure out a way 
to score one mure point than the other team on the road, 
you gel on the bus and you get out of town" 

Senior guard Blake Young, who was ihe leading 

Set MEN Page JO 



Less-ambitious New Year's resolutions can still be started 




KENDALL 
HALL 



Though January is quickly coming 
to an end, for sonic, the wm is really 
just beginning If your New Year's reso- 
lution sounded some- 
thing like, "I'm going 
to lose 150 pounds 
this year," now is not 
too late to start 

If you haven't 
even entertained 
a thought like that 
since the pou cr wcnl 
out and you flunked 
your last final, now 
would be Ihe time. 
To start, consider 
your class schedule 
and pencil in a time lhal you are go 
ing to make it lo the gym lust like you 
wouldn't skip your human body li . 
ture, you need tn train yourself nut u> 
skip the gym 

If exercise is something you have 
only heard about in movies, then trying 
to force yourself to do cardiu for three 
hours every day is unrealistic Start 
with going to Peters Retreat ion Com 
plex three days a week When a healthy 
thought runs through your head, tell 
your roommate, your significant oth 
er or your dog |ust saying it out loud 
and telling someone elat wfll make you 
more likely to slick lo it You might 
even inspire KHMOM else lo make 
healthy choices, too. 

Which brings me In another pj 
of advice drag some poor soul with 
you when you work out. 



A sure-fire way tn make sure you 
fail to meet your fitness goals this sc 
mester is to do something lhal you 
don't know how to do aren't good at 
or can "I stand II you luvc no idea how 

tn work Cybex machine*, then get i 
peaona] trainer or attend a group fit- 
neae class H the thought "I running on 
I treadmill lor. in hour absolutely bores 
you lo lears, then switch machines c\ 
etj let) minutes or go for a run outside 
You can do other activities - hut if your 
boyfriend loves to play racquelball, bul 
taaembtei hen Salter's character from 
"Along Came Polly," then maybe the 
rowing machine looks a little friendlier 

GrouB Illness classes arc || 
excellent way to introduce yourself to 

exercise, especially now H Ihe begin 
mug ot the semester when everyone in 
il.iss is in the tame boil as you they 
ibsolutely no idea what they are 
doing 

Ii> help students Find an idea, the 
ring a new Friday class: tai 
chi tad it BOSt i.i workout which in 
volvcs hal) exercises lo im reaae bul 
inci oi indoor cycling sound like 
something you wanl lo try-, then keep 
looking tur free < laues 

Then is also the possibility thai 
iiii.ii New Years resolution had null) 
mg to do with Illness at all. but instead 
mi to ii \ to MX better The ret* of- 
fers a nutritional aoalvis lor $l r > lor 
K. Male Rudents and $20 lor everyone 
else with a m embe rs h ip You earn hove 
your diet evaluated, set goals and make 




Photo illu«r»lion by joslyn Blown | tollh.ro. 

Exercise baits provide an excellent way to work a variety of muscles. The ball relieves 
stress on the back. 



plans lo change your diel 

QlH last little lidbil of advice if 
you are going some place warm (or 
spring break, I might suggest that you 
get your butt to the rec now, instead of 
waiting until March 9 lo lose those 2 ! > 
extra pounds? 1 realize you might noi 
wan Mo hear it, and I might be "sucking 



the fun out of your February," bul you'll 
thank me when you look sexy on the 
beach 



Ktndatl Hall n » mow hi kinesiology and a (ertjfted 
personal tiaiiwr at ttw Peien Hwrwtion Comptw, 
Pteaw lend commtntj to sports ■ tpub.ksu.edu. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 

NO. 22 

Wildcats 

to face 

Iowa State 



By Joel Jellison 
KANSAS STATE COtUCUM 

Fresh off the defeat of 
another top 25 ranked team, 
the K- Slate women will finish 
a three-game homestand lo 
night when the Wildcats play 
Iowa State 

This time ii will be the 
newly-ranked No 22 Wild 
cats who will have a target 
on their backs The Wild 
eats moved into the AP Top 
25 after beating three ranked 
opponents in their last four 
games. 

K-State (12-5, 4-0 Big 
12 Conference) reached its 
besl conference start since 
the 2003-04 season Saturday- 
night when they topped then- 
No 25 Colorado 

K-State coach Deb Pat- 
terson said the Cyclones 
present a different challenge 
for the Wildcats because they 
run a system which relies 
heavily on the three point 
er, and they posses the ability 
to hit those shots from any 
where. 

"In the country, there is 
no team like them," she said 
"They really have a very dis 
tinct style, and when you are 
shooting 20 lo 26 ihrees ■ 
game and (hat's your priori- 
ty, it's a system." 

K- State also has been 
shooting the three pointers 
well lately 

In conference play, the 
Wildcats are 27 of-72 from 
three-point range. It's an im 
prove inent from last season 
lhat Patterson attributes to 
better rhythm. 

"A year ago we had a ba- 
zillion wide-open three looks 
that we missed, but I'm not 
sure that we had neccssari 
ly established quality rhythm 
with five players on the floor," 
she said "1 think this year 
better tempo and 



we have 
rhythm." 
The 
could be 



improved rhythm 
attributed to the 
returning experience of ihe 
Wildcats and the way they 
have been playing as a unit 
on the floor Four starters are 
averaging 35-39 minutes per 
game in conference play 

"We don't have one play- 
er that we turn to this year, 
we have all live ol us lhat can 
do the job," said junior guard 
Shalcc Lchning. "This year 
our team has a burning desire- 
inside of us that we haven't 
had in the past few years; we 
never give up." 

Lehning said the Cy- 
clones are a different team 
in comparison lo the oilier 
learns K-State has played tin- 
season and said they ' 
be respected on Ihe court. 

"They are a very talented 
team." she said, "lust a hard 
working, blue collar team 
that is coming in with ihe 
ability to knock down threes 
at every position 

Iowa State (12-5. 1-3 Big 
12) received one vote this 
week in the AP poll and is 
coming off an 82-72 loss to 
Nebraska Saturday 

The last time the Wild 
cats faced Ihe Cyclones WM 
in the 2007 Big 12 omnia 
ment when they came out 
on Ihe losing end of a 57-45 
g a int- 
estate is led in scoring 
in conference play by senior 
guard Kimberly Dietz. who is 
scoring 175 points per ganu 
and Ashley Sweat, who aver 
ages 15 8 per game 

Tip-off for the game is 7 
p.m. today in Bramlage Coli 
scum 




Sellers, Groves weekend performances 
honored with Big 12 track weekly awards 



I "I tl.lANHl.l VW 



Junior Scott Sellers completes a successful high jump at a 2007 meet 
Sellers was one of two K-State athletes honored this week by the Big 
12 Conference 



Two K State track & field athletes were honored by the 
Big 12 for their performances at the Wildcat Invitational last 
weekend 

junior Lorcn Groves was also recognized. She received 
Ihe Big 12 women's indoor track athlete of the week. Groves 
set a career-best in the women's weight throw with a mark ol 
69] 1 50. which also broke the university record by nine inch 
es. 

Groves ranks second on the NCAA performance list and 
automatically qualified for the NCAA championships To 
qualify for the NCAA in the women's weighl throw, compel i 



tors must throw at least 68 9 feet. 

Junior Scott Sellers received the Big 12 men's indoor 
track athlete of Ihe week award. Sellers finished second in 
the high jump with a height of 7 04 50 He only trailed 2007 
USA runner-up |esse Williams from the University of South 
ern California 

Williams was recognized as the top collegiate high jump 
er in the country. Sellers currently ranks firs! in the nation in 
the high inT,,j event on the NCAA performance list. Sellers 
cleareu the qualifying height of 7-03 5 inches during the Car- 
ol Robinson Winter Pentathlon Dec. 7. 



(MMHHaaaaa 



■~\ I 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 7 



WORLD NEWS 




TO THE EDITOR 



PAKISTANI PRESIDENT PROMISES ELECTIONS, ASKS 
WEST FOR PATIENCE 

BRUSSELS, Belgium - President Pervcz Musharraf 
promised Monday that Pakistan will huld (air election! nod 
month anil urged the West to be more patient with his na 
tion'a efforts to achieve higher standards of human rights 

He also sought to ease worries about Pakistan's nuclear 
tneiul tl Islamic extremists step up their lighl with his gov 
eminent, insisting thai light security would prevent the weap- 
ons from falling into the hands of terrorists. 

We have a multi layer custodial and command system," 
Musharraf told the European Parliament as he began an eight 
day European trip by meeting with senior EU and NATO offi- 
cial*. 

Musharraf said Pakistan is a largely tribal society strug- 
gling to he >i democracy and taking on the role of a front-line 
player in the global fight against terrorism, 



CHINESE OFFICIAL CALLS FOR EFFORTS TO STOP 
WORKPLACE ACCIDENTS 

BKIIING - China's senior safety inspector urged the 
public and the media Tuesday to expose workplace accidents 
in a bid to end corruption and official misdeeds that are ag 
gravating the country's high rate of work deaths. 

I i Ylzhong, head ol the State Administration of Work 
, said public whisilebl owing provides crucial clues for 
ten hobbled by cover-ups by local officials, es- 
pecially on coal mine accidents. 

"We welcome the public's supervision We welcome the 
reports made by people to expose corruption," Li said at a 
news conference in which he appealed for help five times 
rditlf to sonic tips, for example, we have found gov- 
ernment officials who made unlawful investments in coal 
mines. 

Appeals for public and media intervention are an incrcis 
injjly common lactk fol the usually closed, authoritarian com 
mtinisl government as il tries to rein in local officials eager to 
protect industries and businesses flourishing under capitalist 

rms 



NEW IRAN RESOLUTION EXPECTED TO PASS SECURITY 
COUNCIL THOUGH DIFFERENCES EXIST 

TAK1S - The UN Security Council's five permanent 

members and Germany art expected to agree Tuesday on a 

■MOlution to pressure Iran on its nuclear program, a 

French diplomat said But a U.S. official said differences over 

the issue remain. 

The seniop French diplomat, who briefed reporters Mon- 
day on condition that he nut be identified by name, said an 
agreement was very dote and should be finalized by the six 
nations' foreign ministers at a meeting in Berlin, Germany 



However, others were more cautious about what the talks 
could produce. Momentum (or a third resolution has slowed 
since a U.S. intelligence assessment last month indicated Teh- 
ran had stopped active work on a nuclear weapons program 
in 2003. 

A senior U S official said Monday that the six nations 
had made some progress in negotiating a new resolution in 
a Hurry of weekend conference calls, but "substantial" differ- 
ences still existed. 



FORGERY INVESTIGATION UNDERWAY FOR PUTIN 
CRITIC, RUSSIAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE 

MOSCOW - Prosecutors announced a forgery investi- 
gation Tuesday into the campaign of the only liberal Kremlin 
critic still in Russia's presidential race, a contest already ex- 
pected lo be won easily by Vladimir Putin's hand-picked can- 
didate to succeed him. 

Liberal opposition groups arc small and weak, and former 
prime minister Mikhail Kasyanov has been given no chance 
in the election, even if the probe doesn't push him out of the 
race. 

A spokeswoman for the prosecutor-general's office, Tati- 
ana Chernyshova, said on state television that the investiga- 
tion involved possible forged signatures on nominating peti- 
tions for Kasyanov 

Chernyshova said suspected false signatures were found 
in the Yaroslavl and Mari-EI regions. The head of Kasyanov's 
campaign in Mari-EI, Rustam Abdullin, was detained earlier 
this month. 



NEW AGREEMENT COULD SEND ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS 
HOMETO VIETNAM 

HANOI. Vietnam - Thousands of Vietnamese living il- 
legally in the United Slates now face deportation after the 
two countries completed an agreement Tuesday, a move that 
sparked worry among immigrant communities. 

Vielnamese who entered the US illegally after the for- 
mer foes normalized relations in 1995 could now be forced to 
return to their birth country, said |ulie Myers, director of U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement. 

The deal has been under negotiation for 10 years. Viet- 
nam had previously been reluctant to accept citizens back, 
and community leaders in the U.S. said many immigrants 
have been living with deportation orders for years, even de- 
cades 

"Some Vietnamese have been here a very long time," said 
Carolyn Tran. an organizer with VietUnity, an Oakland-based 
Vietnamese community organization "They don't have a con- 
nection there any more." 



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Friday's editorial on 
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ethnicity, finding content- 
ment is one of the most 
valuable quests you'll em- 
bark on. And once you do, 
it will be a challenge to re- 
orient yourself to stay on 
the journey. 1 hope Mark's 
thoughts on giving did not 
fall on deaf ears. 

But because we all 
need reminders, I want- 
ed to repeat the call to en- 
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PAW 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



Macintosh unveils thinnest 
laptop yet to be produced 



By Brandon McAtct 
KA8MS STATE COUBGUM 

Macintosh unveiled its latest laptop 
this month, which proved to be the thin- 
nest laptop available: the Macintosh Air 

The Mac Book Air is 0.16 to 0.76 ineh- 
et ilnn and weighs about three pounds, 
with a 1280 x 800 resolution. 13 3-inch 
LEU screen. The laptop also features a 
full-size, back- lit keyboard that adjusts to 
lighting tor ttie area the user is in 

"Iri definitely the thinnest, but it is not 
the lightest." said Drew Claassen, Union 
Computer Stun iMOChrte and senior in mar- 
keting "Apple made it with the full keyboard 
and also made it not to .sacrifice any battery 
hi.- 

The bitter) iv thinner than the usual lap 
top batten but will siill last up to five hours, 
.rple.com. 

The Web site also claims the Air in 
dudes two pf ■ RAM and SO giga- 

hyn- . t It will include the 

ojktii M gigabyte solid state 

drive which ■ no moving parts for 

dursb 

ClMMrn Uid lb* Air is between the 
Mac K.'.i's Mac Book Pro in terms of 

*h.it i- li.i> tu offff 

"It is kind ill designed as your second 
computer, but it could be used as your first," 
he said 

Inputs included on the Air include a 



UNDERCOVER 




n ilium* aw 



USB 2 port, a headphone tack and a micro 
DVI port, according to Apple's Web site. 

The Air docs not have a CD drive, but 
one can be purchased externally Without 
one. a user can transfer files with other cum 
puters without wires There also will be a 
built-in camera on the monitor A feature not 
seen before is the trackpad, which is compa- 
rable to a touch screen. With the trackpad, 
users can pinch, swipe or rotate to zoom in 
on text, or they can advance through photos 
and adjust an image, all from simple move- 
ments of their fingers over the pad 

"1 am sure the trackpad is changing 
computers and |it] is the way it will be in the 
future," Claassen said. 

Though there are only about six pre or 
ders from the Union Computer Store, Claas- 
sen said he believes it is something that most 
people actually want to see 

He said the thinness of the Air is diffi- 
cult to describe accurately 

"1 don't think it is something you can 
even fathom until it is actually seen." Claas- 
sen said 




2nd-grader donates art-show 
proceeds to devastated school 



GREENSBURG, Kan. 
- Elementary school stu- 
dents here have finally got- 
ten a chance to meet the 
McPherson, Kan . girl who 
raised $4,000 to help rebuild 
their school 

During a school assem- 
bly Monday. Emma Marten, 
7, and her family handed 
over the proceeds of a Sep- 
tember auction of her art- 
work 

"For a second -grader 
tu undertake what she did- 
the compassion- it was in- 
spiring," said Stan Derstein. 
principal of Greensburg 
Grade School, which was 
destroyed along will) most 
of the town by a tornado in 
May 

School officials said 
they plan to use the money 
any way they CM but will fo- 
cus first on the school's art 
program and Emma's grade 
level They said they typical 
ty target donations on con- 
tributors' areas of interest. 



Marten said she got the 
idea in May when she saw 
a Kansas City based artist's 
benefit art show for Greens- 
burg in Hutchinson Her 
parents told her they would 
help her do a benefit show of 
her own if she created 25 art 
pieces, which she did most 
ly out of crayon, marker and 
paint 

"When she did the piec 
es, we kind of realized it's 
our turn to do our part," said 
Amy Marten. Emma's moth- 
er, "and we put the prayers 
out there, we put the word 
out, and people literally 
started coming to us and say- 
ing. 'This is the person you 
need to talk to,' or 'We've al- 
ready taken care of the auc 
tioneer' The pieces really fell 
into place It was very evi- 
dent that God was involved 
in it from the beginning" 

A new school won't be 
completed for more than a 
year, but the school is mak 
ing do with temporary facili- 



ties 

A new gym and cafete 
ria already have been built 
and served as a backdrop for 
Monday's ceremony 

Students at the school 
sent Emma Marten thank 
you notes and cards after 
hearing about her auction 

"We've had lots of peo- 
ple around the state doing 
various things," said Darin 
Headrick, Greensburg n 
perintendenl of schools h i 
really touching and it's | 
ly special when the kids do 
stuff" 

Emma Marten's school- 
mates and members of her 
church in McPherson also 
wrote cards to Green iburg*! 
kindergarten through third 
grade students, which were 
handed out before Monday's 
event 

it's an honor fur us that 
Emma gets to be the laee of 
this, but it really was a eon 
munity effort," Amy Marten 
said 



Jonathan Knight | COLLEGIUM 
Virginia MoxUy dean of hornan ecology, walki through a shaft of light in front of the K-State Student 
Union late Toesday afternoon 

Embattled KG parks board member resigns; said she felt 
betrayed by mayor, needed to express ideas on immigration 



See a photo 
opportunity?, 




Call 532-6556 

("*»«* H S * 1 | ( tt I 
^OI.LKCilAN 



KANSAS CITY, Mo - 
Pr an ces Semler, who was the 
focus of months of controversy 
because uf her affiliation with 
an anti -illegal immigration or- 
ganization, has resigned from 
the city parks board. 

Semler. 74. said Tues- 
rfJBj she resigned because her 
involvement with the Kan 
sas City Parks and Recreation 
Bi ianl had become too conten- 
tious and she did not feel May- 
or Mark Funkhouser support 
ed her 

I EmI betrayed." she said 
• Emm time to time they would 
say good things, but from time 
to lime there would be some 
thing hurtful Bllt it all pile*. 
up" 

Semler, a member of the 
Arizona-based Minute-man Civ 
tl Defense Corps since Dee em- 
ber 2006. said she spoke with 
Funkhouser mi Tuesday after 

he received ha resignation let- 
ter, which she faxed to Ins <>t 
lice late Monday night Funk 
ho user did not know Sem- 
ler planned lo resign, said his 
spokesman, Kendrick I' 
mod, 

Punk ltd he was 

disappointed with Sender's res 
ignution 

"She savs she didn I 
supported," Funkhouser said 
1 1 think the record shows dif 
ferently." 

Funkhniiser named Sent 
ler lo the five member park 
board lust mound Her ap 
pointinenl triggered prr 
in in) minority groups includ 
niH the National Council ol La 
Kaza, which voted in October 



to cancel plans to hold its na 
lional convention in Kansas 
t it\ because of Semler's Min 
utettum membership. 

Last week the Southern 
Christian Leadership Confer 
ence said it also decided to 
move its convention from Kan- 
sas City to New Orleans 

Charles Steele ]r. presi 
dent and chief executive offi- 
cer of the Southern Christian 
Leadership Conference, ad 
vised other civil rights organi- 
zations to boycott the city be- 
cause of Semler 

lanet Murguia. president 
of La Raza, said Tuesday it was 
"regrettable that the mayor did 
not act sooner" 

"I place responsibility for 
this whole mess itrttighl at the 
feel of the mayor." Murplia 
tald "He has tu he accounl 
able for this, and he should 
move forward hopelully having 
learned from the experience 
and becoming tin ire sensitive 
to the interests of tha Hispanic 
community and in the broader 
economic intetects of the city" 

Chris Simcox, pre 
ot the Miiuitemaii Civil De- 
fense Corps, said Ptffikho 
has chosen lo play racial pot- 
ilu-s and eater hi thcbJfOl 
the open borders lobbj rather 
than support his own appoin 

tee France* Semler." 

In a telephone interview 

Tuesday Semler defended her 
involvement in the anti illegal 
immigration group winch ad- 
vocates patrollinc the Mexican 
border and report) illegal im- 
iniej ants m authorities. 

I'm a dweut, nice per 



CLASSIFIEDS 



sun that happens to belong to 
(he Minuteinan and thinks our 
borders should be protected 
and our laws upheld," Semler 
said. 

Semler said her resigna- 
tion was not prompted by any 
one incident, but that she grew 
tired of being called a racist 
and of the "unjust" accusations 
against the Mmutemen. 

"Several times 1 was ac- 
cused of being racist, and I've 
never been racist," she said 
"When you see horrible names 
that people call you, it takes 
you aback." 

She said an option she 
was given by the city was to re- 
nounce the Minuiemen while 
continuing her participation, 
which did not sit well with her 

"li just seemed dishonest," 
she said. "Il was just being false 
Then it's just gone on. Little 
things here ot there, he [Funk- 
houser I stated that he doesn't 
can 1 for the Minutetnen. That's 
his privilege" 

However, she said, she 
should he able to express her 
ideas about illegal immigration 
and serve on the park board. 

"Many citizens are reluc- 
tant id do so for fear of being 
subjected lo the destruction of 
their character as I have been." 
fur resignation letter said.She 
said she will continue her fri- 

■nent with the Minute 
man Civil Defense Corps but 
would not become involved 
again in city politics. 

"It really suddens irre," 
Semler said ' I wish them well 
1 really do, for the city's sake, 

ton" 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 



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ADS 

LET THEM WORK 
FOR YOU 

Kansas State Collegian 

103 Kedzie 
785-532-6555 




Bulletin Board I Housing Real Estate 




LEARN TO FLV! K State 
Flying Club ha* live alt 
planes and lowast (ales 
Cell 785-776-1744. www 

kiu WluVsIc 




LOST KEYS Trirw Draw 
and one Volvo car key 
Reward MioHGSksu eriu 
or &M-605-S3W 



MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 48 14 assuras ev- 
ery person equal oppor 
! unity In housing with 
out distinction on ac- 
count of rata, mi. famil- 
ial status, military sta- 
tus, disability, religion 
iga, color, nation at ori- 
gin or an cat try Viola- 
tions should be re- 
ported to the Director ol 
Human Resources at 
Crty Hall, 7BS-SB72440 



MANHATTAN CITY Ordl 
nance 4814 astute* ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity In housing wrllh- 
oul distinction on ac- 
count ot race, sen. limit- 
Is! status, military sta- 
tus, disability, religion. 
age. color, national ori- 
gin or ancestry Viols- 
lion a should be re- 
ported to the Director ot 
Human Resource* at 
City M»M, 7SS-5BT 2440 

A VERV nice one bad 
room Ckise to campus 
and Aggiewlta New paint, 
carpel and appliances 
Available now 1 No pets 
785-3381124 



Assistant Operations Manager 



Graduating in May in Business 
or Operations Management? 

This position might be just what you're looking for. Start part- 
time this spring and become lull-time upon graduation, 
Cushion Seats, Inc. is a fast growing local company offering 
seating services to some of the largest Football Stadiums in 
the country Position requires strong analytical skills, attention 
to detail, great communication skills and a drive for success. If 
you enjoy sports and a fast paced environment this job is for 
you Cheek us out online at www seatbacks com Pay is S25K- 
S35K based on experience 
Please send resume to: 



Cushions Seats, Inc. 
Attn: Kara Gonzales 
520 McCall Road 
Manhattan, KS 66502 




got memories? 



we do. 



royal purple yearbook • 103 kejdzie hall • 532-6555 • royalpurple.ksu.edu 




collegian 



xploro ft 



kstatecolleg 



ian.com 



an @ Lifetime 



engagements and weddings 

And then I said, YCS. 

Once in a Lifetime, in the Collcgiiin tnc uim .' uluv uf the month 

to ■nnounct your milnton*. vim *«on. loj to tdvertiu. mi tM-Mto 



Classifieds continue 
.from the previous page 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



CLASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



To place an advertisement ca 

785-532-655* 

PAGE 9 







v : 



1 1 1 1 i ■ 1 1 ■ a .£. 

:: l» »j :: "J. 1 . ■■ :: 



Help Wanted 



LET'S RENT 



Rent- Apt Furnished 



ONE, TWO, ana thiee- 
beoroom apartments ex- 
cellent condition Next to 
K Slate and Aggievtlle rea- 
sonable rales private 
parking, attentive land 
ejrd. no pats June and 
Auguat «*Ni TNT 
I 785-539-5508 



Rent-Duplexts 



Rent -House 



NICE DUPLEX 808 Vat- NEW HOUSE, tour bed 

Oar, lour -bedroom two room, two bathroom, 

bath. all appliances, dote to campus, avail 

washety dryer. August 1 able August isi 1614 

11,080/ month 785-293- Pierre 78S-J04-OM7. 
5197 



ONE, TWO. and tiree- 
berjroom apartments new 
Construction nam to In- 
state and Aggleville up- 
aeale newer apartments 
wasber/ dryer. dhjh- 
wasbet, central alt. pn- 
vata parking, security light 
ing. no pets. June and Au- 
gust leases TNT Renters 
785-539-5508 




bouses eacerierri condi- 
tion next to K-Siate and 
AggieviHa Multiple 

k richer s and bathrooms, 
washer' dryer dish- 
washer, central air, rea- 
sonable rales no pets 
June and August N H jaee. 
TNT Rentals 785-539- 
0549 



NEWLY REMODELED 
three -bedroom , one bath- 
room, large garage 1401 
Yuma 785-304-0317 



NEXT TO campus. Avail- 
able now, June and Au- 
gust One, two. three, 
lour. I've. ai>. and nine- 
bedrooms Apartments 
houses, and multiplexes 
No pets 785-537-7050. 



Rent-Houses 



NICE BRITTNAY Ridge 
Townhome tour -bed- 
room, two and 1/2 bath, 
all appliances, washer/ 
dryer August 1. No pats. 
$980' month 785-293- 
'■■j: 

THREE, FOUR, and II** 
bedrooms Didn't get the 
house you wanted last 
year* The good ones go 
last Cat 785-341-0*88 



JJ 
Rent Apt Unfurnished 



APPLY ONLINE l One to 
tour-bedroom apartments, 
studios and lofts available 
January or August 2008 
Visit us at housing k-slale 
edu or can 785-532-3790 
10 set up a lour. 



ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartments in new build- 
ings Dose to campus 
and Aggievtlle Available 
June and August 2008 
No pets Call John at 785- 
313-7473. 

ONE BEDROOM COZY 
apartment, one block from 
campus $500/ month, in- 
cludes utilities Call 785- 
770-0491 

PARK PLACE Apartments 
summer- I all leasing Best 
deal in town on one and 
two-bedroom Student 

specials il leased by 
Februarys 785 539-2951 

THREE-BEDROOM 
JUNE/ August leases. 
One block to campus/ Ag- 
gievtlle Central air. lull 
Mlchens. washer' dryer on 
site 785-539-4841 



NOW LEASING 
FOR FALL 



■ Be dr oo m Aptf 
Cambridge? Square 
Sandstone 
Petaleb'ooh 



Open Saturday 103 

537-9064 

iww M I, rwstarirl rental .com 



Rent-House 



AVAILABLE NEXT school 
year Three to eight -bed 
room houses All have lull 
kitchen, washer dryer, 
central air Call now lor 
best selection www tore- 
mostpfoperty.com. 785- 
539-4641 

LARGE FOUR -BED- 

ROOM two bathroom, 
carpeted rec room. Near 
Aggioville' campus, cen- 
tral air. washer/ dryer, dis- 
posal, fireplace, garage 
Available now, lease 
terms negotiable 765-317- 
5488 



ONE. TWO. three, and 
tour-bedroom houses 
Close to campus/ also 
weatslde Available Im- 
mediately. No pets. 785- 
539-1975 or 785-313- 
8296 



ONE, TWO. ihtee, lour, 
live, and slx-beOrourn 
apartments and houses 
available lot June and Au- 
gust. 785-539-8295 




•1114 

•Bit Oeaje- 



■COMPLETE LIST of 
houses close to campus 
tor sale Isrrylimbock 
■r B raec eandn ich ols com 
785-317-7713 Comer- 
stone Realty 



THREE/ FOUR-BED- 

ROOM, updated brick 
ranch home Next lo KSU 
Stadium. $137,000. Call 
785-539-6751 



Roomrruite Wanted 



LOOKING FOR female 
grad student to share 
three bedroom two bath 
room house 1350 Lease 
& move in date flexible E 
mail alarsen(9ksu edu 

MA1E ROOMMATE 
wanted. House three 
blocks from campus 
1325 00 plus one-fourth of 
utilities Cal 620-228 
1 »: ■ 

ROOM FOR Rent Unrver 
sity Gardens Two-bed- 
room/ two bath Share 
wilh male gred student 
Rent is 1280 phis uWrHes 
Contact me at marychnsti 
nesondner^Py ahoo.com 
r 91 3-620-0579 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
Nice, spacious three -bed- 
room house $350/ monrh 
plus bills Available imrne- 
g lately Call 620-654-7696 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
as soon as possible 1 One 
btock from campus 1 You 
will have your own bed- 
room and own full bath- 
room' With washer/ dryer, 
dishwasher, and fireplace 
Water end trash paid for' 
It Interested call Cami at 
785-747-6742 or email 
me c2)<e>ksu edu 

THREE FEMALE inlerna- 
tional graduate sludenls 
looking for roommate at 
University Crossing www - 
ucmanhartan com. Cal 
712-281-7877 or e-mail 
ruppmek ssa 9 gmail . com 




A WELL eataWshed. pro- 
NMsionel landscaping 

company la seeking a reli- 
able individual tor lull lime 
employment in their land- 
scape Installation division. 
Prior landscape or larm 
experience 
Above average 
commensurate with expe- 
rience and ability Benefits 
Include major medical, 
paid leave and 401 k Ap- 
ply in person at 11524 
Landscape In, St. 
George. KS 66535 785- 
494-2418 or 785-776- 
0307 






Spacious 
Duplexes 



Each duplex features 

walk in closets. 

all kitchen appliances, 

washer/dryer, 

off street parting, 

phone and cable 

connections n every room, 

security lighting. 

trash snd lawn cut. 

Security deposit is the tame 

as one month's rent 

One Year Lease period 

begins August 1st 

4 Styles 

i Bed rooms, 7 Baths 

»,60QSq ft 

Mondo Conrto 

' 2 Living Rooms, Wall mil 

upper deck, large study 

otfit a. Structured cable. 

Spacious laundry room 

ONLY tl,550/mo 

4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths 
T.800 Sq. ft 

Herts nda 

2 Living Rooms. Spacious 

I ■ unit ry room 

ONLV JUMmiu 

4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths 

1,600 Sq Fl 

? Levels Slulfy office 

ONLY 11. ISO/mo 

4 Bedrooms. 2 Bslhs 

1,300 St) Ft 

ONLV SUW/mn 



* J .*e*aer»e— L 



Iter-' 31 3-079 1 

Nferrt: SJ7-4UJM 



1999 OAKWOOO three- 
bedroom, two-bath, walk- 
in closets, garden tub, 
shed Located in Walnut 
Grove 18,000 or best oi- 
ler Can 785-317-4689 



FOR SALE 1995 Liberty 
mobile home 16x76. two- 
bedroom, two bath with 
shed $15,000 785-494- 
6484 Five miles east of 
Manhattan in nice park 



FOR SALE BeautlM two- 
bedroom, one bath. 14x 
85 mobile home, two car 
carport. partially fur- 
nished, garden tub. an ap- 
pliances, large shed and 
deck. Poeaabta owner fi- 
nancing, $10,500 Walnut 
Grove (7 85) -565 -2*83. 



FEMALE SUBLEASED 
needed Four-bedroom, 
two bath apartment $310 
plus utilities. Very close lo 
campus" Available now - 
January rent tree' Call 
Kane 31 6-644 -02S8 

ONE BEDROOM IN two- 
bedroom house Great 
roommate February I- 
June 1 $385 per month 
includes ail ulliilies except 
internet/ cable Close to 
campus Price nego- 

uaWe 785-427-6638 

SUBLEASER NEEDED in 
a two-bedroom apart- 
ment, includes washer/ 
dryer, waler and trash 
paw $315/ month plus 
utilities. Call 785-820- 
0512 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
through May or July wtlh 
option to renew lor follow 
mg year> Three bedroom 
house with private room, 
washer/ dryer, wireless In- 
ternet, digital cable with 
DVR 1275 rent plus utili- 
ties on average 1150) ca- 
ble and Internet included - 
Move In Today' 719-432- 
7015 




FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share house 
with female and male 
$300/ month Utilities 
paid Call 785-537-4947 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to Nve with two 
clean, Inendly girts. Spa- 
cious Ihrse-bedroom 
house. Includes washei/ 
dryer, dishwasher, and 
garage Close lo the sta- 
dium $366/ month. 785- 
477-1135 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial po- 
tential ot advertise- 
menta In the Employ- 
ment/ Career classifica- 
tion Reader s an ad- 
vised id approach any 
auch business opportu- 
nity with reasonable cau 
Hon The Collegian 
urges Our readers ID 
contact the Better Buii 
neae Bureau, 501 SE Jef- 
ferson, Topetta, KS 
66807-1190. 785-232- 



ADMlSSIONS REPRE- 
SENTATIVE Kansas 
Slate University is recruit- 
ing lor at least one and 
possibly several positions 
ot Admissions Represen- 
tative These indrvtduals 
are responsible lor the de- 
velopment and implemen- 
tation ol an efleclive stu- 
dent recruitment program 
withm a specific geo- 
graphic region. The maroi 
responsibilities include 
Coordinating strategy and 
resource people for the re- 
gion serving as Ihe pn- 
mary recruitment repre- 
sentative; developing and 
maintaining service rela- 
tionships wflh high 
schools and community 
colleges: attending major 
community events; and co- 
ordinating efforts for the 
region with K -State faculty 
and staff Qualifications in- 
clude a recent K-State 
bachelors degree; lamil 
larity and excitement for K- 
State; demonstrated aca- 
deme success and stu- 
dent involvement/ leader- 
ship skills in student 
groups and organized liv- 
ing; strong communication 
skills total/ written); strong 
social skids for a variety ol 
situations, ability to work 
Independently, overall 
high energy level and en- 
thusiasm, willingness lo 
travel extensively; and a 
valid driver's license Al 
least one successful can 
didsle should have native 
or near-native Spanish 
language proficiency One 
admissions representative 
will be located in Dallas 
Texas, and represent the 
university in the slate ol 
Texas Applicants wanting 
lo be considered lor the 
Texas admissions repre- 
sentative position should 1 
Indicate so in their teller ot 
spplicaljon Position will 
start July 1. 2008, and 
pay $30,500 for twelve 
months Candidate should 
send a letter of applica- 
tion, resume, iranscrlpt(s). 
and the names and phone 
numbers ol three refer- 
ences to: Search Commil 
lee, New Student Set 
vices. Kansas Slate uni- 
versity. 122 Anderson 
Hall Manhattan KS 
66506 Application dead- 
line is January 25. 2008 
Kansas Slate University is 
an Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer and actively seeks 
diversity among Us em- 
ployees Paid tor by 
Kansas State University 

fo miMoi m i ; 



ACCOUNTANT/ CEO 

Due to our continued 
growth, CtvicPtus, the na- 
tions leading provider ol 
City. County, and School 
websites, has an opening 
tor a tuH-time accounteffl 
This career position re- 
quires the abmty to handle 
multiple tasks and prion 
ties while maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Accounting expert 
ence Is required 
Peachtrse experience pre- 
ferred Competitive pay 
phis benefits Including 
Health Dental, Paid Holi- 
days, Paid Vacation and 
401 K Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft. Word or Text for 
met to 
tota«etvicp»u».ooni 

ACCOUNTING CLERK 
part-time with USD 383 
Business Office $7 CO per 
hour Twenty hours per 
week during school year, 
lull-time summer hours 
High school graduate or 
equivalent, computer 

sklta including experience 
with Excel, working knowl 
edge ol office procedures 
and equipment, basic *c 
counlmg skills Job de- 
acnption available Apph 
cations accepted until po 
sitlon Is filled Apply to 
Manhattan-Ogden USD 
383 2031 Poynu Ave 
Manhattan, KS 66502 
785-587-2000 Equal Op 
portunity Employer 

APPOINTMENT SET- 
TER: CMePlue is the na- 
tions leading provider of 
City. County and School 
websites We have lull 
end part lime positions in 
Manhattan with significant 
Income potential tor the 
nghl individual This posi 
lion involves caking poten- 
tial clients to setup wetoi- 
nar appointments Pay is 
$10/ hour plus 140 for 
each webinar appoml 
men I you setup Full-time 
benelits include Health, 
Dental. Paid Holidays 
Paid Vacation and 401 K 
matching Email resume 
m Microsoft Word or Tent 
format to 
jobs® civ icplu & . com . 

ASSISTANT TENNIS 

COACH, Eisenhower Mid- 
dle School Salary sal by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spring season Accepting 
resumes or letters with 
quail lir.atcins until position 
is tilled Apply to Manhat- 
tan-Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poyntz Ave, Manhat- 
tan KS 66502 785-587 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 

BARTENDING i $300 A 
day potential No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 1-800-965 
6520ext 144 

BILLING COORDINA- 
TOR: Due to our contin- 
ued growth. Civic Plus, the 
nation's leading provider 
of City. County, and 
School websites has an 
opening tor a full-time 
Billing Coordinator That 
exciting opportunity re- 
quires ihe ability lo handle 
multiple tasks and prion 
ties while maintaining a 
positive and energetic attt 
tude Competnive pay 
plus benefits including 
Health. Denial. Paid Hod 
days, Paid Vacation and 
401K Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or Text tor 
mat 10 
)oti»H>ctv»cplus com . 

CHIPOTLE- WORK at a 
place where you actually 
want to eat Ihe lood< 
Chipotle is now hlnng al 
positions. Free food, flexi- 
ble hours. Apply 1 p.m to 
5 p.m . Monday through 
Friday 785-567-8029 

COMPUTER PROGRAM 
MERS wanted for posi- 
tions in the Knowledge 
Discovery in Databases 
Research group al K- 
Stale Applicants should 
be responsible, diligent 
and creative, and should 
be lamiliar with CI or 
Java, or have the ability to 
learn Pay is commensu 
rate with experience: all 
grades are encouraged lo 
apply Call 785-341-1599 
or send resume to btxiutt- 
asksu.euu 

OAYCAHE NEEDED lor 
two girls. 4 years and 8 
months ol age. Couple 
hours a day and some 
evenings, please have ref- 
erences Contact Amy at 
785-410-5718 or e-mail 
me at amy-pics1«coi - 
net 

DERBY DINING Center 
Openings in sanitation 
and food production de- 
partments Starting at 
16 75i hour. Flexible 
hours Apply at Derby 129 



JJ 
Help Wanted 



EARN $800- 13200 a 
month to drive brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
them www AdCarCkjb - 

com. 

FARM WORKER Cjttte 
grain opeiation experi- 
ence Can 7B5-456-3090 
or 785-456-7215 after 7p- 

m 

FULLTIME AND part- 
lime Porter needed Must 
have valid driver's license 
and clean driving record. 
See Eddie at Schism 
Chrysler Dodge 3100 An- 
derson. 

FULL-TIME CLERK posi- 
tions available Motorcy- 
cling background a plus 
•VIII tram Apply in person 
at Brooks Yamaha. 8070 
Easl Highway 24. Man hat, 
Ian. KS 

FULL TIME SUMMER ki- 
temship Open lo all ma 
lore, gain career skills, re- 
sume experience, aver- 
age earns 1700/ week. 
For details call 785-317 
0455 

GRAPHIC DESIGN 
Pius, a Manhattan baaed 
company and the leadet 
in government wabarf a . 
la seeking lull-time and 
contract graphic design- 
ers No HTML experience 
is necessary but must be 
profioenl In Photoshop 
An understanding of 
Flash. Adobe Ikuslrator. 
and Microsoft Word is 
helpful but not required 
Must be able to manege 
multiple protects simulta- 
neously in a last-paced 
environment Full-time 

benefits include hearth, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 (k) 
matching Email resume 
and design samples to 
ic*e#chrtcplue com 

HORTICULTURAL SER 
VICES Garden Center is 
seeking reliable, moti- 
vated todrviduala for luN- 
tlme and part-time sea- 
sonal positions In our re- 
tall store Above average 
wages commensurate 

wtlh experience and abili- 
ties Apply in person at 
11524 Landscape Ln . St 
George. KS 66535 785- 
494-2418 or 785-778- 
0397. 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 
and Landscape Foreman 
needed. Competitive pay 
and benefits Please con- 
tact Athens Services tn- 
c ol Topeka, KS 785 232- 
1 556 or www athansaer- 
vicescom 

MAKE A DIFFERENCE! 
DO SOMETHING DIF- 
FERENT! Camp coun- 
selors wanted Friendly 
Pines Camp. Prescott. 
AZ. is hiring tor '06 sea- 
son 5/24 7/31 30 plus ac- 
tivities, equestrian, water 
ski, waterfront. ropes 
course. rjmblng and 
more> Competitive salary. 
Call 928-445-2128. e-mail 
lr*o©rhsndlypines com or 
visit website www friend- 
lypmes com for applica- 
tion! information. Have the 
summer of a lifetime- 

MANHATTAN COUNTRY 
Club has Bag Room/ 
Range' Carl staff open- 
ings Must be able to lift 
approximately thirty 

pounds overhead. Apply 
in person at 1531 North 
10th Street. Lower Level 
Tuesday- Friday 8 30am 

^f>nir^^^^^_^^^^_ 

MOUNTAIN DEW repre- 
sentatives n e ed ed . Be a 
leadet this spring I Get 
paid to promote a brand 
you love while gaining 
real world experience. 
Only two positions are 
available Go to www • 
rep nation, com/dewcrew 
in apply! 

fibE0 SOMEONE to help 
clean my house, sixteen 
hours/ week Call Rhonda 
at 785 537-7978 lor inter 
view 

NOW HIRING Subway 
Work up lo X hours a 
week, meals provided 
Day, night, and weekend 
shins needed Will work 
around schedule Pick up 
appkcetion al any Sub- 
way including the Student 
Union ^^^^^^ 

PART TIME SALES Faith 

Furniture in Manhattan is 
seeking dependable 

associates for sales and 



V 

Help wanted 



and weekdays •» avail 
able Every tourth weak- 
end oft A great part -lime 
job! Apply In person 302 
East Hwy 14 



PROGRAMMER RE- 

SPONSIBLE lor devetop- 
mem of the website sys- 
tem lor Civic Plus, the na- 
tion's leading provider ot 
local government web- 
sites This lull time posi- 
tion requires ASP or ASP- 
NET experience, knowl- 
edge of SQL. solid experi- 
ence with HTML. CSS 
and Javascript Fast 
paced environment thai re- 
quires hard work and a 
smile. Competitive pay 
plus lull time benefits In- 
cluding Paid Training. 
Health. Denial Paid Holi- 
days, Paid vacation and 
401 (k) matching EmaH re- 
sume to: 
fObeOclvicplus com 

PROJECT MANAGER: 

CivtcPluB hss an opening 
In oui Manhattan head- 
quarters office lor a run- 
time Protect Manager 
This challenging position 
entails managing multiple 
website redesign protects 
from start to finish Posi- 
tion inquires attention lo 
detail, the ability to man 
age multiple tasks, priori- 
ties and deadlines, and a 
cheerful attitude Training 
Is provided Benefits In- 
elude Heetth, Dental. Paid 
Holidays. Paid Vacation 
and 401 K matching 
Email resume m text or 
Word formal to 
tObeQcfvicEHus com 

SECRETARY/ RECEP 

TIONIST. Wen organized, 
energetic person for run- 
time position with busy 
non-profit agency Re- 
quires outstanding tele- 
phone and office skills, 
top notch communication 
abilities and pleasant "can 
do" altitude Two years of- 
fice experience, profi- 
ciency m Microsoft Word 
end Excel required Send 
cover letter, resume and 
three references by Jan- 
uary 24 to Screening 
Committee. North Centrel- 
Flint Hills Area Agency on 
Aging. 40* Houston 
Street Manhattan. KS 
66502 Equal Opportunity/ 
Affirmative Action Em- 
ployer 

STEEL 8 PIPE Suppry 
Company- Inventory Ana- 
lyst Assistant There is an 
immediate opening for an 
Inventory analyst assis- 
tant at our corporate of- 
fice Position Is responsi- 
ble lor creating migration 
matenals. analyzing and 
monitoring SAP software 
processes snd mleaiig 
in analysis of warehouse 
cycle counting data. Afao 
support for customer ser- 
vice snd sales slaH Quail- 
lied candidates wMI have 
basic math and account 
Ing Work experience In In- 
ventory control a plus 
Two years college educa- 
tion preferred. Interested 
applicants should submit 
resume to Steel 4 Pipe 
Supply. Inv. Analyst As- 
sist . PO Box 1688, Man- 
hattan KS 66505 Equal 
Opportunity Employer. 

GREAT JOB tor Out 
dooray People! Kaw Val- 
ley Greenhouses is lock- 
ing for help Ifus growing 
season We are interested 
in part or full- time sched- 
ules tor the second 
semester For more infor- 
mation contact human re- 
sources al kvgemploymen- 
IsJyahoo com or 778- 
8585 To apply In parson 
go to 360 Zeandale Rd 
Manhattan Monday- Fri- 
day 8am 4pm 

HEAD TENNIS COACH. 

Eisenhower Middle 

School. Salary set by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spring season Accepting 
resumes or letters with 
qualifications until position 
Is filled Apply to Msnhat 
lan-Ogden USD 383, 
2031 Poynu Ave, Manhal 
tan. KS 88102 785-587 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 

HELP WANTED: KSU 

BEEF CATTLE RE- 
SEARCH CENTER 
CONTACT: Garrett at 
gparsonseksu.edu or 
785-539-4971 

HOME CHILDCARE 

wanted for 2 5 and 7 year 

old DrtvaWe and reliable 
car needed, References 
required Contact Lindsay 
al 785-317-2140 or 
Ik nurse 79iffgmail com lor 
more information 



I) 

Help Wanted 



STEEL AND PIPE SUP- 
PLY COMPANY- Buei- 
neea Analyst There la an 
immediate opening for a 
Business Anafyet al our 
corporate office This lull- 
time position la part of an 
IT Development team, 
whose leak la to execute 
prefects involving informa- 
tion technology to supply 
added business value 
The Business Analyst po- 
sition is responsible tor de- 
veloping business require- 
ments, lasting solutions, 
and training users on 
those se4vltona. Qualified 
candidates wW have excel- 
lent people skills and 
must be detail oriented 
Two- five years expert- 
ence and/ or education in 
Business ot related field 
required Knowledge ot Mi- 
crosoft Office applications 
required Competitive pay 
with axceMnt benefits In- 
terested applicants should 
e-mail resume and cover 
letter to pauirtvfspsa 
Cum or mall to SPS. Atten- 
tion Matt. PO Box 1668. 
Manhattan, Kansas 

66505. Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



STUDENT PUBLICA 

TIONS Inc has a part- 
time position lor a Macin- 
tosh technician available 
The tech support team 
maintains about 50 Mackv 
tush workstations, provid- 
ing software support as 
wen as performing gen- 
eral hardware mainte- 
nance Any experience 
with Mac OSX. design 
software such as Adobe 
Photoshop, Adobe InDe- 
sign, and networking Is 
helpful but not required. 
Pay starts si $6 50 per 
hour with Ihe opportunity 
to advance Must be a full- 
lime student al KSU. Ap- 
plications may be picked 
up in 1 1 3 Kedite or online 
al http/Avww kstateoolle 
gian com/spub/ Down- 
load the second appkea 
Hon at Ifxs link Appkea 
Uuri deadline is 5 p m Fri- 
day, February IS, 2008. 
Ple as e include your 
spring 2008 cl-iss ached- 



STUDENT TECHNICIAN 
position opening $7 00/ 
hour Hours required 20 
hours/ week When class Is 
in session, 40 hours/ 
week during summer end 
breaks Job description 
Pickup and delivery of 
computers primers, etc 
to various campus loca- 
tions (valid drivers license 
required), general PC and 
printer maintenance and 
repair, general inventory 
and accounting functions 
Preferred quaJllcations 
1st or Snd year student In 
computer, electronics, or 
related maior applicants 
with demonstrated me- 
chanical aptitude, com- 
puter maintenance experi- 
ence helpful How lo ap- 
ply: Interested applicants 
should come in person to 
i2i East Stadium to Ml 
our an application f la il 
contact Anthony Phillips 
a I Anthonydksu edu with 
any questions about the 
position 



I) 
Help Wanted 



TECHNICAL SUPPORT 
position available for K 
state undergraduate flu- 
dent wflh a variety of 
skills Must have good In- 
terpersonal and problem 
solving skills. Experience 
with PC's and popular soft 
ware appkcalions auch as 
Word Parted. MS Word. 
MS Excel, MS Internet Ex- 
plorer. Internet applies 
lions, basic web page edit 
ing and Windows applies 
tions desired. Must have a 
technical understanding ol 
Microsoft Windows Sum 
met availability neces- 
sary Computet Network 
experience preferred Ap- 
plications must be submit- 
ted at Department ot Com- 
munications IET. 211 Lfm 
beiger Hall. 785-532 
6270 Applications wW be 
avertable/ accepted until 
January 25. 2008 Please 
attach resume with the ap 
plication 

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mall IgbociaroiAjnop* net 

WORKING MOM needs 
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three nights a week includ- 
ing some weekend 
s Hours 5 30p.m to 7 
00a m Wilt pay $30 00 a 
night Easy part-time (ob 
Call Kathy al 785-537 
8556 or 785-410-7533 




GROWING COMPANY 
seeking motivated K> 
Staters who wish to earn 
money fast working part 
time online from home 
www lavidanca abunza - 
com 




Open Market 




COMPUTER, WINDOWS 
Business, internet and En- 
tertainment CD-ROMS lor 
Sale al Discounted 
Prices i Visit www fas 
landeaay com/Walker 




MULTI-FAMILY SALE 

Manhattan Junior crew 
rowing club Microwave 
vacuum, furniture, cloth 
Ing, takes, etc Saturday 
January 26, 8a m- 1 2p rr. 
(Bag sale- 10:30a m) 
3015 Anderson. Inext to 
Ray's Apple Market. Ptaia 
West Shopping Center). 




Pregnancy 
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539-3338 



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drivers. Flexible scheduling, 
free/discounted meals 
great pay, and a fun 
work environment. 
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1 



PAGE 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



CENSUS | Ag report can be tedious, 
but affects nearly every farmer 



Continue) from Plfltl 

11 people are making decisions 
on bad data, then that could do 
tiu good" 

Elaine Heller, technology 
support consultant for the Of- 
fice of the Registrar, said she 
and her husband received the 
2007 census She said her hus- 
band is the one who Fills out 
the paperwork, which can be 
time-consuming because it re- 
quires comprehensive informa- 
tion that the couple wants to 
make sure is accurate 

"It is something that my 
fnfchand feels obligated to do," 
she said 

She said they have been 
involved with different agricul- 
lujal organizations, including 
Harm Bureau, and know the 
importance of the data. 

Sue II s;ili1 Oleic m NW 

reasons why people have neg- 



ative thoughts about the cen- 
sus those that receive it see the 
length of the survey and realize 
the amount of information they 
will be releasing 

"Nobody likes paperwork 
- it's fairly lengthy." Snell said 
"It takes some time The oth- 
er thing is I think a lot of them 
feel like it's nobody's business. 
They feel like they're divulging 
information they would like to 
keep private." 

However, Snell said the 
data gathered does not reveal 
any information about individ- 
ual fanners AU of the infor- 
mation from the census is kept 
confidential. 

US Code states that those 
who receive a form must com 
pletc it, even if they did not op- 
erate a farm or ranch in 2007, 
according to US CodeTitfe 7. 

Tlncssen said some people 
might receive the census even 



if they did not operate a farm in 
2007 because their name was 
on a list included with other 
producers. Some people might 
have sold their farming opera- 
tion between the last census in 
2002 and the most recent cen- 
sus However, they still need 
to return the paperwork. Little 
information is asked of those 
who did not operate a farm in 
2007 

Thiessen said Kansas Ag- 
ricultural Statistics has been 
gathering the data for years 
and has built up a list of names 
of producers He said a major- 
ity of the names of producers 
come from people's participa- 
tion in government agriculture 
programs 

"We look everywhere," he 
said. "We're interested in build- 
ing a good list because we're try- 
ing to do the best job we can in 
building agricultural statistics." 



MEN | Young players 
improve play on way 
to solid Big 12 start 



Continued from ftqt 6 

rebounder in the game 
against Texas A&M. said al- 
though some critics might 
see playing with significant- 
ly younger teammates as a 
disadvantage, it makes him 
better individually 

"I play against these 
guys every day in practice," 
Young said. "I know what 
they can do I'm a pret- 
ty good defender and some 
of them are having to make 
me work on defense, so 
that's been helping me with 
my defense, and f know 
what they can do to other 
defenders" 

One of those defenders 
is freshman forward Ron 



Anderson. 

Anderson, who is sec- 
ond on the team in field- 
goal percentage with a 57- 
percent shooting average, 
said he and the rest of the 
freshmen recognize the lev- 
el of play the Big 12 re 
quires. 

"When the Big 12 
comes around, the competi- 
tion gets a lot harder," An- 
derson said "At our away 
game in Oklahoma, it was 
tough and we had to fight 
through il Once the Big 12 
comes, you can't get those 
games back. H's important 
to us to get that NCAA bid. 
so we just keep working ev 
ery day in practice and try 
to be the best we can be ," 




lOUttt 

MENU GUIDE' 

in back of the 

Campus Phone I 

Available in fotttelOJ 
Mon.Fri. 8 a.m. 5 p.m. 



\C»v)£ 



ijr Clean out your closet 

for CA$H 

Rockstar & Rodgers pays cash or credit 
for name brand used or vintage clothing!, 



On sale in Kedzie 103 
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri 





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What we want... 



• High dollar, modern cut, mart and 
women's used jeans 



• Nice stacks, T- Shirts, Button- ups 

• Gently used Shoes, Hand bags, 
and other Accessories 



• Skirts 
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• Vintage 



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What we 
DON'T 
want... 



Where to 
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715 N. 12th Street 

in Aggievilfe 

by the carwash 




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785-587-1819 



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When to 
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Mon-Thurs 

between noon 

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PAGE 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



BIG 12 MENS BREAK REVIEW 



BIG 12 WOMEN'S BREAK REVIEW 



BAYLOR (15 2, JO BIG 12) 



r: The** over Nebraska 
d*2S game 814 liroad long 
Ml 

Last fame out Baylor prevailed owr 
Nrtf«Ju,7?-70.iiHjra*i.N(ti 
i%«ti*p:t«>ighuiTMasA&M 




Overview TV lounfcwttBtht 

BulMoK 3 1st str«qN toss la I ranted 

opponent on thf mid. 

Us! gam* otrt: Cotorada dapped 4 tM7 

loss it> lews in Austin, feus. 

Nirt up: tough nK-Utt 



IOWA STATE (12 6, 2 1 BIG 12) 



NO. 2 KANSAS (18-0, 30 BIG 12) 



NO. 6 BAYLOR (161, 40 BIG 12) 


Overview. Tnetearuontern at N» a ■ 


I in the conference through one- ■■■■■ 


quartet of the Biq ligamnaM 0. M^^M 1 


mrith a 16-1 overall record Their low || jj 


toww«jtMo4S»nW.»7-61. LJ 


Utt Unit wt Baylor beat 


Mia***! 


**W w- tonight it Mnsoun 



COLORADO (12 5,1 3 BIG 12) 



Overview; The Suffatoe* iff on J 
thiee giro* ( onference losing streak 
after winning (hen league opener ji 
Missoun. 70-S8 
Last ttm* out Colorado lost to 

Hilt up: Tuesday «. Kansas (at tune of press) 




IOWA STATE (12 5,1-3 81612) 



OvirvievcThe Cyjonniinpiwrithw 
record to 9-0 svtstn storing at least 70 

Last game ouL kwu State brat QUa 
homa State, 75-66, n Anws, Iowa 
Next up: tonight it Kansas 




Oveevtevr Dnprie poor shootnq, the 

layhawls still defeated Missouri and 

ntmdcct the* sthoot-recnrd best start 

suxett* 199697 season 

Last gam* out KU beat Missouri 76-70 it 

Cokmbu.Mo 

MM up; Wight vs low* State 




K STATE (12-4, 20 BIG 12) 



m TV Cali are off to thr ir first 
2-0 staii in conference play m 1 5 yrm 
Last pa out, K-State toppled No. 9 
lexas ism 75-S4.it home 
Hut up: tonight al Cotondo 




Y*> 




Overview: the tigers boast a 10-1 
record at home this season. 
last oamtouLMiswtin dropped a 76- 
70 drew on at home against Kansas. 
: tonight at Itrus 



: If* Cvc lows stand in 
10th place i quartet through the 
season and art (tying to gel Mil of a 
little two- game toswg streak 
Uft bmaout the Cyclones lost to 
Nebraska, tl U 
Nnt up: tonight it K State 




KANSAS (12 -5,1 3 BIG 12) 



Overview: the JayhavAs are 1-3 in 
conference play tnd got the* ttnl 
league urn in then last gar* against 
the Missouri Irgwi. 66-60 
List time out, Kansas brat Missoun, 

66-60 

Me it up: Tuesday at Colorado (at time of press) 




NO. 22 KSTATE (12 5, 40 BIG 12) 



OwntewK Slate could be the story of 
the Big Q so far as it has stormed into 
tonteiwie ptay winning sewn inaiwt 
and hokh a M record m the Bag 12fcr 
the first time smce the 2003-04 season 
Last the* out K State beat 01, 6760 
Ne*t»p: tonight rt Iowa State 



MISSOURI (8-9, V3 BIG 12) 




-, 



Overview- Foot games into the season, 

Missouri finds ilseff the bottom clweiers of 

the B«j 1 1 Conference. MS is the ewty team 

In the conference with i losing record 

Last tfciw out, Missoun caiMnl hold on 

tobealKU6cv*0 

Ntil tap: tonight vs Baylor 




NEBRASKA (11-5, 0-3 BIG 12) 



OKLAHOMA (13-5, 12 BIG 12) 



Overview: IV Husken entered the 

BaytotcjamranMISMMkinily 

in free -throw shoots percentage at 

68.2 percent. 

Last gam* out Nebraska tost at home, 

72-70, against Baylor 

Nnt up: Saturday at Kansas 




Overview: Junior forward laytor Grtffm 
recorded his hrst double-double of tV 
season in the wmoveftaaswdi. 
last gam* out, Oklahoma gained 
then first Big 12 Conference win, 63-61, 
against letasfeth 
Meat up: Saturday at Baylor 



% 



NEBRASKA (14-4, 31 BIG 12) 


OveevtewTtstComhusterserethe Lm\ II 


only one-toss Mm in tV cordeiwc*. 


■VI 


Iheionh/tonlMncelosswasatNci! 10 


OHahoma.SO-72 


U»\ LI 


Lastttm* out Nebraska beat Iowa MB "IB 


MftSA 


Nt««:tca^atNa10lFUsMM 



NO. 11 OKLAHOMA (11-4, 2 2 BIG 12) 


Overview: the Sooners could be the 




disappointment of the &g 1 1 season. 




but they also could have the hardest 


■ III 


schedule since they've already played si« 


^ A 


tanked teams 




last time out, Oklahoma fell to Baylor. 


84-73 


Next up: loniqhr vs. Texas Tech 





OKLAHOMA STATE (10-7, 1-2 BIG 12) 



NO. 12 TEXAS (14-3, 1-1 BIG 12) 



Overview: TV Cowboys' toss to Ima 

State was the* loth straight road toss 

Last gam* out JUahoma State tost to 

Tnas.6341 

Next up: Saturday B lews AAM 




Ov«m«w: A 24 1 run in the second 
half of the tonghoms' game agiinst 
Colorado helped clinch tV win 
last gam* out, tens edged Okla- 
homa State, 63-61. 
Hnrt up: Saturday vs. teias Tech 




NO. 18 AP TEXAS A&M (15-3, 12 BIG 12) 



TEXAS TECH (10- 7,1 2 BIG 12} 



Overview: TV Aggrs made orwy Ml 

out of their hrst IS shots In the second 

halt against K State 

Ust oam* ant Texas ASM W on tV 

road for the second txne last week in a 

75-54 loss UK-State 

Mart up: tcmgtn vs Baytot 




re Tech has yet to beat a 
Division I -A opponent on the toad this 
season 

Latt fame out, Tech lost 63-61 against 
Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. 
Ntit up: tonight vs. Missouri 



¥ 



- Compiled by Tyler Sharp 



NO. 14 OKLAHOMA STATE (16-1, 4-0 BIG 12) 



TEXAS (13-5, 1-3 BIG 12) 



Oftnfew: Oklahoma State is just two 
years away horn* 0-16 league record 
but Ki strong contender to win with a 
4-0 record thus far, 16 1 overall 
Last time out Oklahoma Stair 
bested Texas UM. 61 58 
Next up: tonight at Texas 



A a 



Ovenriew: TV tonghoms ate in sixth 

place in t V conference after losing three 

out of lour to begin the conference, 

including a home loss to * State, 77 74. 

last time out: Texas fell to Texas lech, 

70-58 

Mett up : ton K)ht ts Ok I J homa Stale 



NO. 21 TEXAS A&M (135, 1-3 BIG 12) 



: TV Aggies finish the hrst 
quarter ol B*j 1 2 play vnth a I -3 record, 
and a 13- 5 record overal TV* one 
cu nfew r x e win was at Colorado. 72-61 
last tame out. The Aggies tost to 
OUanoma State, 61-58 
(4ert lip: lonigM it Nebraska 



Apl 




Overview. TV Lady Raiders isoate 
m the middle of tV 6ig 1 2 with a 1-3 
record. TVy started off with three 
sttaight losses, but come off a big home 
win against Texas. 70- 58 
Last time out Tech beat Texas, 70-58 
Next up: tonight at Oklahoma 



- Compiled by Mike DeVader 



Campus Phone Books 



Buy A Book 



WORTH ITS PRICE 




off 



Columbia 

SptTOvrorGimpany'. 

Basketball 
Shoes 



81 



WOBTMI. MMMM 



AS ALWAYS 

dP 2 K-StateT Shifts fot $15 at Ballard s 

Welcome Back & 
Good Luck Students! 





WEDNESDAY - 

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Kitraoke9 10 pm 

$3.95 BIG BEERS Imhhyt* cum 

$2.75 BOTTLES & WELLS 
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Wednesday - Mixed Drinks SO< off 

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lyi©* Sat- 32 otDomttrticDnws £3.75 

Swiflay - Bloody Kary $2.50 

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I) I 



We ve got the stories you've got to read. 

The Royal Purple yearbook is available in Kedzie 103. Stop by or call 532-65S5. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



mi. 



Dietz leads K-State to victory in her senior 

Colorado native leads team in scoring, 
increasing production in Big 12 play 



season 



By Jo*l Aichbn»r>ner 
KANMHrMEtOUEGIMi 

The women's basketball 
team owes much of its seven- 
ganie win streak and 4-0 Big 
12 Conference record to senior 
guard Kimberly Dietz. 

Dietz is leading the Wild- 
cats in scoring and has been 
pivotal to the teams' recent suc- 
cess 

"Without Kimberly. we 
wouldn't have won these 
games." senior forward Shan a 
Wheeler said "She has definite 
ly grown to be a huge factor" 

Dietz, who has been aver- 
aging 14 4 points per game mid 
17.5 points per game in con- 
ference play, credits her team- 
mates for her success this sea- 
son, and for the team's recent 
achievements 

"All my teammates were 
working so well," Dietz said. 
They are just hitting me when 
I in open It's been amazing. 
This team has played with so 
much heart" 

K- State started conference 
play with an upset of Texas 
A&M in College Station, Texas, 
and then upset Texas in over- 
time in Austin The Wildcats re- 
lumed home where they beat 
Texas Tech and then upset Col- 
orado, 

Dietz. a native of Boulder, 
Colo, said beating the Buff a - 




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Iocs was special However, win 
ning the road games is what has 
stood out most lo her 

"It's so hard to win on the 
road in the Bie 12," she said. 

Dietz said her biggest con- 
tribution 1<> the team's recent 
success has been off the glass. 

"I'm getting more re- 
bounds That's been my biggest 
goal," Dielz said "If the team 
gets rebounds, we're going to 
win" 

She is averaging 4.3 re 
bounds per game in conference 
play, which is almost a rebound 
and a half more per game than 
her season average. 

Dietz said the team's atti- 
tude also has contributed to the 
winning streak. 

"I think our disposition as 
a team has changed," she said. 
"We're done losing now" 

While Dielz has been effec- 
tive on the court recently, her 
success al K- Slate is not new 
During the Texas State game on 
Dec 16, 2007. she became the 
33rd K- Slate women's basket- 
ball player to score 1,000 career 
points She scored 22 points in 
the 90-52 win 

She said reaching 1,000 
career points was important to 
her, and she was glad to be part 
of K Si, nc history 

Coach Deb Patterson said 
she has noticed Dietz s contri- 
bution to the team's recent suc- 



cess. 

"She's a great leader on 
ihe floor, Patterson said She's 
been driving the ball well and 
making good decisions. Kim- 
berly has just been a key factor 
to any success we've had." 

Patterson said Dietz is Ihe 
kind of player she likes to have 
in the game. 

"Coaches dream of playing 
seniors. Patterson said. 

Dietz played an average of 
almost 39 minutes per game. 
She played the entire game 
against Colorado and 44 min- 
utes in the overtime win against 
Texas 

"Kim is a senior, and she is 
mentally tough," Patterson said 
"She has always had a good fit- 
ness level Most of all she has 
matured." 

Dietz said she has enjoyed 
all the playing time 

"We've been working so 
hard," she said Coach (Patter- 
son] decides who plays, and it's 
been an honor getting to play so 
much" 

Throughout the success of 
her senior season, Dietz said 
overall her favorite thing has 
been playing home games wilh 
the support of fans. 

"We've been winning, so 
we've been getting more fan 
support They are the sixth man 
for us," Dielz said "1 love play 
ing at Bramlage" 



...••' 



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Senior guard 
K Imb.rly Dtrti 
makes a mflJt 
past a Colorado 
defender ian. *^ 
K- State went on 
to win the game 
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PAGE 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2008 



Martin deserves fan support 




JONATHAN 

WRIGHT 



He was just an assistant 
coach under Bob Huggins 
who was kepi around to keep 
a stellar re- 
cruiting class 
intact His 
only head 
coaching ex 
perience 
came when 
he was at Mi 
ami Senior 
High School 

We've 
heard the 

same argu- 

ment time 

and again Frank Martin isn't 
the guy to take the Wildcat 
basketball program to the next 
level After being one of his 
skeptics. Martin convinced ine 
Saturday that he s just what 
the Cats need 

EXHIBIT A 

K State was down 1 1 -3 
against the No 10 basketball 
team in college basketball, and 
Texas A&M sophomore for- 
ward Bryan Davis committed 
a foul. With 14:56 left in the 
first half, it was time for the 
TV* timeout Both teams went 
to their respective benches 

As they left the huddle. 
a new Wildcat team stepped 
onto the hardwood. This team 
was energized, focused and 
sharp K-State came back with 
an 11 3 run to tie the game 
at 14. Fans should commend 
Martin for getting his players 



back in the game 

EXHIBITS 

With 16:34 left in the first 
half, freshman forward Mi- 
chael Beasley committed his 
second foul Most coaches 
would sit their star player for 
the rest of the half in hopes of- 
keeping him out of foul trou- 
ble for the second half 

Not Martin. He brilliant- 
ly used junior forward Dar- 
ren Kent and Beasley in an of 
fense -defense scheme that not 
only kept Beasley out of foul 
trouble but also kept the Wild 
cats in the game by allowing 
their greatest offensive threat 
to contribute. 

EXHIBIT C 

Coaches make their living 
off halftime and in-game ad- 
justments. Martin is no differ- 
ent. The Aggies shot 4f> per- 
cent from the field in the first 
half and held a 17 13 rebound- 
ing advantage The Wildcats 
spent the majority of the first 
half in straight man-to-inan 
defense, and the Wildcats led 
35-33 at halftime 

During the second half, 
the Cats mixed up their de- 
fenses, alternating between 
a match-up zone, a 3-2 zone 
and man -to- man. Texas A&M 
looked confused and con- 
stantly was trying to guess 
what defense the Wildcats 
were in A&M's field-goal per- 
centage dropped to 38 percent 



for the game, and K- State held 
the final rebounding edge 29- 
23. 

People who blame Martin 
for the Cats four losses seem 
to overlook one fact : they 
play seven freshmen. KU went 
through some of the same 
growing pains two years ago 
that K-State is going through 
now. They had an enormous 
ly talented recruiting class and 
began the year with high ex- 
pectations. 

The | ay hawks lost ear- 
ly games to Ball State, Arkan 
sas and Nevada. They went 
on to win the Big 12 Con- 
ference Tournament and ad- 
vanced to the second round 
of the NCAA Tournament be- 
fore losing to Bradley. Now. 
two yean later with the same 
corps of players, they are 
ranked No 2 in the nation 
and are one of two undefeat 
ed teams in college basketball 
The correlation is surprising. 

It's not fair to jump to 
conclusions on this man be 
fore he has a chance to prove 
himself Martin made a state- 
ment Saturday through his 
smart decisions and leader 
ship He is the right man (or 
the job and is a big-time coach 
in the making. 




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Jonathan Wright is a senior in pre 
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



Adding it up 



K-State to graduate record number of math teachers 




Joilyn Brown | ODU EUIAN 
Graham Ratzlaff Jesii Lindar arid Tytef Stubanhoftr, seniors in secondary math education, listen to JMy Haarscha tell stories during dinner at Old Chicago 



By Joe Vossen 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Most undergraduate students 
face many of the same anxiet- 
ies: difficult classes, long hours of 
studying and worries about finding 
a job after graduation. But at least 
3 1 seniors in the College of Educa- 
tion are not worried about finding 
that perfect job. 

As secondary schools across 
Kansas and the United States face 
a shortage of math instructors, 
K- St ate will graduate one of its 
largest classes of secondary math 
education students in May. 

Larry Scharmann, chairman 
of the Department of Secondary 
Education, said in an average year 
the College of Education awards 
degrees with math certifications to 
about 15 to 18 students. In May, as 
many as 31 future math teachers 
might walk across the commence- 
ment stage. 

"With the shortage reported 
throughout the stale, some people 
might call that a bumper crop," Sc 
harm an n said. 

One instructor will remember 
this class not just Cor its size, but 
the promise these future teachers 
show in making a difference in stu- 



dents' lives 

Lori Martini, instructor of ihc 
Math Methods course at K-State, a 
class taken by secondary math ed 
ucation degree candidates before 
they student teach, worked close- 
ly with the 3 1 students set to grad- 
uate in the spring. 

"I've got student teachers who 
are very strong in their social skills. 
and they're strung role models (or 
kids," Martini said "That's what 
excites me about this group - not 
only are they strong with content 
but they are strong with their inter- 
personal skills," 

Last Thursday, four seniors in 
secondary math education met at 
Old Chicago to chat about their 
first week of student teaching. 

Jessi Linder, senior in math 
education, was one of those stu- 
dents She said the students meet 
often, and it was the friendships 
that grew between her and her fel- 
low classmates that kept her fo- 
cused and excited about becoming 
a teacher. 

"We all banded together," 
Linder said. "They are what I'll 
remember from K- Stale We saw 
each other almost every day in 
class, and we studied a couple 
nights a week together. That's what 



kepi us going - we were a group, 
pushing each other along I know 
it wouldn't have been as much fun 
without them" 

Joey Heersche. senior in math 
education, first enrolled at K-State 
as a psychology major, but an expe 
rience between his first two semes- 
ters made him consider a change 
in curriculum. 

"I went back [home] over 
Christmas break," Heersche said, 
"and my high school wrestling 
coach let me help coach the team 
After talking with him I realized 
that what 1 wanted to do was teach 
Math sounded appealing because 1 
was good at math, and I knew it 
would get me a job, and coaching 
because I love working with kids" 

Heersche said his course load 
at K State kept him busy, but the 
help and advice o( another teacher 
motivated him 

"At K-Slate, Dr. [Andrew] 
Bennett was a huge influence on 
my decision to be a math teacher," 
Heersche said "He kept us going 
and provided help when we need- 
ed it" 

Bennett is just one member 
of a faculty praised by its students. 
Graham Ratzlaff, senior in math 
education, said his department's 



skill in training future educators is 
its main strength 

"K-State has done a great job 
preparing me," Ratzlaff said. "The 
teacher education program at K- 
State gives you a lot of experience 
in the classroom, which 1 think is 
valuable. They can leach you about 
theory, but if you don'l experience 
the classroom yourself you're not 
really going to know what to ex- 
pect." 

Many of the 31 seniors will 
spend their last, semester as student 
teachers, shadowing local second- 
ary instructors. Tyler Stubenhofer, 
senior in math education, leaches 
at Warnego Middle School. 

"Student teaching has made 
me think about classroom man- 
agement." Stubenhofer said. "Ev- 
ery day is different, and in other 
jobs every day is the same " 

Stubenhofer, whose mother 
is a math teacher, said this day-to- 
day variety appeals to him Soon 
he will have a classroom of his 
own, and he and his classmates 
will gel the chance to interact with 
students - and maybe some future 
teachers - each day. 

"It will be rewarding to know 
I'm making a difference in the 
world." Stubenhofer said. 



Vol miNaSJ 



Woman 

injured 

in incident 



By Allison Vons 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

A Manhattan woman was in- 
jured during an alleged aggra- 
vated burglary at her home in 
the University Crossing Apart- 
ments on Monday, according 
to a Riley County Police re- 
port 

RCPD Lt Kurt Moldrup 
said the 21 -year-old woman 
suffered a cut on her left mid 
forearm by a bo* cutter she 
was holding while trying to 
force a man out of her home. 
The man allegedly entered the 
woman's locked apartment 
around 12:45 am According 
to RCPD reports, the woman 
did not know the suspect but 
had met him at Bobby T*s Bar 
and Grill. 

Moldrup said the suspect 
was described as a white male 
about 6 feel 4 inches tall who 
weighed approximately 190 
pounds, with brown hair and 
between the ages of 20 and 
30. The suspect was last seen 
wearing a green fleece pull- 
over, blue jeans and red and 
white tennis shoes. 

The woman received 
stitches for her injury at Mer- 
cy Regional Health Center, ac- 
cording to RCPD reports 



Homeless 

shelter 

to expand 

this summer 



Students come together for documentary on historic black-rights milestone 



By Yvonne Ramirez 
KANSAS STATE COLLEt.lAN 

K-State students repli- 
cated the diversity Americans 
fought for during the Civil 
Rights Movement by sitting 
side-by-side in the K-State 
Student Union Grand Ball- 
room on Wednesday after- 
noon. 

The students attended 
a civil rights matinee movie, 
"February One: The Greens- 
boro Four," sponsored by the 
Martin Luther King Jr. Com- 
mittee in honor of MLK Ob- 
servance Week 

The movie portrayed 
the true story of four black 
friends in the 1960s from 
Greensboro, N.C., who look 
a stand by sitting in a din- 
er designated only for white 
people. Their movement in- 
fluenced other similar move- 
ments to start throughout the 
nation. 

On July 26, 1960, the din 
er decided to integrate and 
the Greensboro four had ac- 
complished what they want- 
ed all along - to be seen as 
people 

Mirta Chavez, director of 



multicultural programs and 
services, said the movie was 
chosen to show a different 
side of what black students 
went through in that era 

"1 think K Stale students 
will appreciate a little bit 
of the knowledge that they 
would not have gotten other- 
wise if we hadn't played this 
movie," Chavez said. "Our of- 
fice is all about educating, re- 
garding what has happened 
in the past " 

The movie was shown 
during the lunch hour and 
concessions were sold for 
$5. Chavez said the planning 
committee decided to show 
the movie at this time be- 
cause students were already 
on campus 

More than 150 students 
were in attendance. 

Ashley Glover, freshman 
in political science, said she 
was inspired by the movie 

"It really showed me that 
an act of bravery and stand- 
ing up for what you believe 
in will go a long way." Glover 
said. 

Most students left the 
ballroom with good reviews 
of the movie. 




Man Cartro | COLLSGUM 

Dawn Wall, technology coordinator for Career and Employment Services, and D*U Owani, CES admin- 
istrative specialist, watch "February One: The Story of the Greensboro Four" Wednesday afternoon In the 
K- Stale Student Union 



1 1 



Emily Surdez, freshman 
in agriculture education, said 
the movie was eye-opening. 

"I think more people 



need to see it and realize how 
much of a difference one 
person can actually make," 
Surdez said. Sometimes you 



think you are just one per- 
son and that you can't make 
a difference, but you actually 
can" 



By Sasha Harden 

KANSAS STATE 001 1.E1.1AN 

Manhattan has a grow- 
ing number of residents seek- 
ing shelter with few places to 
hold these people 

One solution to the 
space problem is a new shel 
ler, located at 416 Fourth St. 
The new shelter is under con- 
struction and should be oper 
ational this summer. A press 
conference is scheduled for 
Jan. 31 to award two grants 
to the Manhattan Emergen- 
cy shelter for their work in 
combating homelessness in 
the Manhattan area. Com- 
munity members looking to 
offer support can contact the 
shelter to learn about "Adopt 
a Room" and other ways to 
help 

Another one of the so- 
lutions is the homeless out- 
reach sponsored by Paw- 
nee Mental Health. Jenni 
fer White, a homeless out- 
reach case manager, has been 
working with the program 
since August 2007. 

The outreach program is 
designed to specifically target 
those individuals who might 
have a mental illness, and as 
a result, are homeless White 
explained the service helps 
people find resources and 
mental health services 

"I can't necessarily say 
[homelessness] has increased 
or decreased, but the word 
is getting out there and peo- 
ple are seeking help." White 
said 

White suggests people 
help by volunteering at shel- 
ters and donating items to 
any social service program, 
including the shelter and 
Pawnee Mental Health. 

"(People need to J be 
more aware of what is going 
on. People aren't aware of the 
homeless population in Man- 
hattan," White said. "Stu- 
dents need to be aware too, 
because there are lots of stu 
dents who don'l have a place 
to call home" 

Mandy Chapman Sem 
pie, executive director of the 
Emergency Shelter, said she 

See HOMEIE55, Pag* 8 




STILL PERFECT 



PAGE 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



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THE BLOTTER 

ARRESTS IN RILEY COUNTY 



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The Collegian takes reports directly 
from the Riley County Police Depart- 
ment's daily logs. The Collegian does 
not list wheel locks or minor traffic 
violations because of space con- 
straints. 

TUESDAY, JAN. 22 
Jesus Bill Cuartat , Fort Riley, at 1 0:20 
a.m. for failure to appear Bond was 
S750 

Randy Carroll Fetters Jr.. 1 745 
Wildcat Creek Road, at 10:50 a.m. for 
battery and obstruction of the legal 
process. Bond was SS00 
Jeremy Matthew Hilt Riley. Kan., 
at 2:24 p m for arranging the vale or 
purchase of controlled substance us- 
ing a communication facility, unlawful 
acts involving proceeds derived from 
violations of controlled substance 



act. unlawful sale of a depressant or 
narcotic and failing to produce drug 
tax stamp. Bond was 55,000 
Frederick J. Greene Jr., St Marys, 
Kan., at 3:45 p.m for probation viola- 
tion. Bond was 5500. 
Joshua Loring Goodman Kr inhop 
2315Candlewood Drive, Apt 7, at 
5:30 p.m. for probation violation. 
Bond was $406 



WEDNESDAY JAN. 23 
Amy Lee Long, 2500 Farm Bureau 
Road , lot 9 7, at 1:10a.m. for d ri vi ng 
under the influence. Bond was 5750. 
Michael Francis Haselhont. 32830 
Wabaunsee Road, at I :S6 a.m. for 
driving with a canceled or suspended 
license and driving under the influ 
ence. Bond was $2,250. 



THE PLANNER 

CAMPUS BULLETIN BOARD 



CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS 

II you we tomethmgthat should be corrected, call news editor Owen Kennedy *t 785 512 
6S56 or e-mail cofffgiareAspufefcsu.edu 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The Collegian, a student newspaper at Kansas State University, is published by Student 
Pubtk at ions inc. It is published weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays dur- 
ing (he si.mmei. Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS. POSTMASTER: Send address 
Change; to the circulation desk at Kedne 103, Manhattan, KS 66S06-7167 First copy free, 
additional copies 25 cents [USPS 291 020) 

O Kansas State Collegian, 2007 



Applications for Student 
Alumni Board are available at 
the Alumni Center or online 
at www.k-state.com/students/ 
st udental umnibaord as px 
An information reception will 
be at 4:30 p.m., Feb. 5 at the 
Alumni Center for anyone 
interested in learning more 
about the group. Applications 
are due by 5 p.m . Feb 7, at 
Alumni Center. 

The Sth-annual Brett Cush- 
■nberry Memorial Bullriding 
will be at 7 p.m. Saturday in 
Weber Arena. Admission for 
adults is $10, 55 with a K- State 
10 and for children ages 6 
to 1 2, and free for children 
younger than 6 years old. 

The KSHAA baseball rules 
meeting will be at 7:30 p.m., 
Feb. 5 at the Manhattan 
High School-East Campus. 
The meeting ts for anyone 
interested in umpiring high 
school baseball. Anyone with 



questions can call Brad Hall at 
785-539-0810. 

The deadline to sign up for 
intramural basketball, 4 wall 
handball, racquet ball, table 
tennis and wallyball doubles 
Is 5 p m. today. Entries should 
be taken to the Peters Recre- 
ation Complex. For into' ma- 
tion and an entry form, go to 
ww w.recser vices lrsu.edu and 
check "Activities and Events* in 
the intramural area. 

The KSU Karata Club will be 

at booth No. 37 on the ground 
floor of the Union at the Activi- 
ties Carnival at 6 p.m. today. 
For more information contact 
Maureen Kerrigan at 785-341- 
7828. 

To place an item in the Cam- 
pus Bulletin, s*op by Kedzie 
116 and fill out ) form or 
e mail the news editor at cot- 
tegian@spob.kiij.edu by 11 am, 
two days before it is to run. 



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What is SafeRide? 

SateRide is free service, by K State 
in conjunction with a Taxi Service to 
provide students with a safe ride to 
their home from any location in the 
city limits of Manhattan 



Using the Aggieville 
Pick-Up Station 

• There is no need to call SafeRide 
if using the Aggieville Station 

■ The Pick-Up station is at Willie's 
Car Wash, 12th & Bluemont 



How do I use SafeRide if 
I'm not in Aggieville? 

LCall 539-0480 

2. Give /our name, location 

and home address 
3 Wait at location for taxi 
( 4. Show a K-State Student ID to the 
taxi driver 

A free service provided by the K -State Student Governing Association 



Every Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday 

11:00 p.m. -3:00 a.m. 



Spring Activities Carnival 




Come visit with more than 115 

student organizations looking for 

new members 

January 24, 2008 

6:00 to 8:00 pm 
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For more information or to view a list of participating 

organizations visit the OSAS website at 

http //www, ks u ed u/osas 



OStfS 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 3 



Photo exhibit features foster children in need of homes 



By Annette Uwkii 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

A new gallery ai Manhat- 
tan Town Center features 52 
portraits of children seeking 
adoption. 

In its fourth consecutive 
year, the Kansas Children's 
Service League and the Kan- 
sas Professional Photogra- 
phers Association have joined 
together to present "Klicks for 
Kids," a traveling photography 
exhibit featuring Kansas chil- 
dren in foster care needing 
adoption. 

There is a tremendous 
need for adoptive and foster 
parents both nationwide and 
here in Kansas," said Gail Zey- 
sing, KGCUs North Central 
Region director "Klicks for 
Kids' is a wonderful opportu- 
nity to introduce adoption, as 
well as some of the children 
who need forever families, to 
Kansans across the state." 

Exhibits like this one in 
Manhattan could help reme- 
dy the problem About 25 per- 
cent of children who partic- 
ipate in the program find an 
adoptive home, giving the chil- 
dren some hope they will find 
a family, according to Kansas 
Children's Service League 

Throughout 2008, there 
will be exhibits in 25 Kansas 
communities, featuring the 
work of some of Kansas' most 
talented photographers. 

Alan Honey, owner of 
Alan Honey Photography, has 
been involved with the pro- 
gram for three years He said 
he appreciates being involved 
with a program where he can 
use his skills lo benefit the 
lives of children 

"It's just a good feeling 
to be able to help some way, 
rather than donating money to 
something that I don't know 
how its going to be spent," 
Honey said "It's nice to see 
the tangible benefit of some- 
thing I do. It's nice to do some- 
thing, to help a cause, to help 
somebody" 

From behind his camera 
lens. Honey said sometimes 




Looking at the "Klicks for Kids' display. Shay Garvin, Manhattan High School senior, reads the stories of 
The gallery-style event was a combined effort of the Kansas Service League and the Kansas Professional 
families for more than 900 Kansas kids. The exhibit will be rouring the state throughout the year 



it's a challenge to photograph 
children who have a difficult 
upbringing. Some of the chil- 
dren are more difficult to pho- 
tograph than others, most like 
ly because of their emotional 
states. 

"They probably feel beat 
en down or neglected They 
didn't have eye contact, but 
you have to get to know them, 
joke around, gain a little bit 
of trust" Honey said "May- 
be in the past, they didn't 
trust adults Maybe they didn't 
smile more easily than others. 
It runs from the pretty typical 



child session to real difficult, 
just to have them look al the 
camera in a more typical way." 

Though some of the por- 
traits might be difficult to turn 
out the 52 children represent 
various ethnic backgrounds, 
hobbies and academic inter- 
ests are featured in the gallery 

Despite their differenc- 
es, they all want a parent, and 
the Kansas Children's Service 
League remains hopeful il will 
fulfill the dreams of these 52 
children 

"When you look at these 
portraits, you can see that 



they are just kids and what 
they want is what every child 
deserves - a family, a home. 
someone to love them," said 
Tina Long, communications 
director of Kansas Children's 
Service League in Manhattan. 

Though several mall pa- 
trons have visited the gallery. 
Long said it is a challenge to 
help every child, but any effort 
is better than none at ail 

"It's more difficult to find 
homes for older children who 
have some special needs, so 
this is about a little extra re- 
cruitment effort to find fam 



Joilyn Brown | COLLElilAN 
Kansas kids waiting to be adopted 
Photographer's Association to find 

Uies for these children," Long 
said "We want to find them a 
home." 

The "Klicks for Kids" ex- 
hibit is in the Manhattan Town 
Center until Jan 29 Anyone 
with questions about adoption 
can talk to the Kansas Chil- 
dren's Service League staff 
members. They will be avail- 
able from 1 to 3 p.m. this Sat- 
urday al the Manhattan Town 
Center 



A wroon of ttiw stor) wtykMllywas 
written tor KTKA TV 49 W News. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

SGA to vote 

on student 

privilege fee 

increase 



By Brandon Stt Inert 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

An increase in the stu 
dent activity fee and the Of- 
fice of Student Activities and 
Services privilege fee will be 
decided on by members of 
the Student Governing Asso- 
ciation tonight at the Student 
Senate meeting. 

"(The student activity 
fee) was reduced the last time 
it was reviewed," said Clint 
Blaes, privilege fee chairman 
"Now we're just bringing it 
back up lo what we're spend 
ing" 

Blaes said the Women's 
Center also will benefit from 
the increase. 

He said the fee will gen- 
erate 37 percent more funds 
for campus- wide organiza- 
tions. Students do not need 
to worry about paying too 
much more, as the increase 
per student will be less than 
$1 

Allocations to several 
student groups and addition- 
al campus organization fund 
ing from reserves are also on 
the agenda. 

Newly introduced legis- 
lation will include commen- 
dations to the KSU Horse 
Judging Team and the K-State 
Crops Team, and resolutions 
lo support a Campus Com- 
mitment to Sustainability and 
the K State Proud Campaign 

"I think (the K-State 
PROUD Campaign | is a great 
way to support our fellow stu- 
dents at K-State." said Lydia 
Peele, student body vice pres- 
ident, "Especially after (he 
success we had last year We 
can see the difference those 
donations are making" 



& 



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KSU KARATE CLUB 

Classes Ixirmingnow: 
Tues./Thurs. 7-9 RM. 
$40 per semester 
Tor more information: 
Maureen (J8$ W-J823 
or infoeUulcarate.org 




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All students interested in Finance are welcome 
Trips to New York City, Boston, Chicago, and KC 
Networking Opportunities with Finance Employers 
Manage a Bond Fund 
Stock Investment Competition 

Our first meeting will be in Calvin 212 at 7:00 pm on 

Tuesday, January 29, 2008 or Visit Table 74 at the 

Activities Carnival today. 



Practices have begun, but don't 
miss the Wichita Stats Hii jJt 

www.ksu.edu/ wrestling 




WILDCATS 

FOREVER 



Show Your Pride, Join Today 



To }oin or for more 
information call 532-6260 or 

check out our Web site 
www.wildcatsforever.com 



*H\ aMOCia-THlN 



Go 



Cats! 



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KSU Swing & Sals 

Whether you 've danced all your life or 

have no dance experience al all. nv 

welcome you to learn all styles of danct 

from Latin to Ballroom. There is 

something for everyone so be sure to 

check us out. For More Information 

email batlroomm ksu edu 




K-State Wesley 

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att Unilrd Mtlhodiw, 



Contact 

Matthew Stone 

rmail: irvt1ortF<ffltiu r,hi 




SHRM 



Society for Human Resource Management 

Meet us at Table 55 or go to 
shrm.cba.ksu.edu to learn more! 



[f] KSU Aikido Club 



The Art of Peace 
Effective Self Defense 
Observers and New 
Members Welcome 



For mora Info contact 
Don Eoele 
786-341 7999 

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Table 45 



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MGE 4 






OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Black and blue 




JESSICA 
HENSLEY 



Candidates 
should address 
issues, not fight 

With presidential primary season and 
the quest for party nominations well under- 
way, the campaign trail yets a little dirtier ev- 
ery day Only a few cau- 
cuses down and a long 
nomination process ahead 
of us. we already are see 
ing too much character as 
sassination and too little 
discussion of ideas 

The 2008 campaign 
already is predicted to 
be the dirtiest presiden- 
tial campaign in histo 
ry," according to an ABC 
"20/20" news report; very 
fitting wtili I he trend in 
national politics. 

Though much has been said about the 
general decline of civility in US politics, 
the trend 1 find particularly disturbing is the 
tendency to demonize one's opponents By 
this I mean the tendency to attack the char- 
acter of those with whom one disagrees rath- 
er than to debate the merits of their position. 

While such character assassination has 
been around since humans first had cause to 
disagree with one another, it seems it has be- 
come more prevalent Consider, for example, 
the tone of discourse exhibited by presiden- 
tial candidates. All loo often, exchanges be- 
tween and even within the political parties 
deteriorate into character assassination and 
dirty campaigning 

In an interview on "NOW" on PBS. vet 
eran campaign strategist Rod Shealy said, 
' [ rhc| challenge as a campaign is to damage 
your opponent without getting caught doing 
it " This is indicative of the trend in US poli 
tics 

There are several reasons why this 
should be concerning, but the most press- 
ing is this when we Tail to engage in the 
thoughtful examination and discussion of 
ideas and seek instead to reach our goals 
through personal attacks, the democratic 
process itself becomes corrupted 

Democracy is founded on the idea of 
government for and by the people But we, 
the people, cannot make informed decisions 
as they relate to the governing of our country 
unless we have considered and understood 




« . • 




Nate Schmidt | COLLtt .IAS 



all sides of an issue It seems truth seeking 
and the genuine desire to debate ideas in an 
effort to find viable solutions have fallen by 
the wayside, replaced by the insatiable need 
to win 

This is exemplified by the fact that the 
presidential candidates appear to spend more 
time discussing their opponents than discuss- 
ing their ideas 

According to an article written by John 
Dickerson of Slate magazine, candidates 
spent more time in the weeks leading up to 
the Nevada primaries accusing each other of 
dirty tactics than they did campaigning. 
How can voters be expected to choose ihe 
candidate who best represents their hopes 
and ideas for the future when all they have 



heard discussed is each candidate s sordid 
past? 

It is beneath us as a people to sink to 
such low tactics as attacking one another's 
religious beliefs and personal character. And 
it is certainly beneath those who aspire to 
the highest office in the land. 

Presidential campaigns should be a plat- 
form for high minded debate and the discus 
sion of issues and ideas which will determine 
the direction of our nation We should expect 
more of our future president, whomever they 
might be, than mudslinging and push polling 



Jessie Hens ley ii a sophomore in political science. Please 
tend torn merit ^ to opinion » ipuft.tiu.ecfu 



People should follow examples of nonviolence 




MARK 

WAMPLER 



On Monday, our nation took a lit 
tie vacation to honor the son of a Bap- 
tist minister and a schoolteacher from 
Atlanta, Ga His 
name was Martin Lu- 
ther King Jr , and his 
life has been taught 
to us since the earli- 
est years of elementa- 
ry school 

The danger with 
being taught such im 
portant histury al 
such a young age is 
thai over time the in- 
formation becomes 
tame and simply the material of leg- 
end King was an extremely hardwork- 
ing individual who lived by the in 
creasing! y rare principles ol faith and 
vision These were based on the print i 
pies of the life a) Jesus Christ found in 
the gospels, and on Mahatma Gandhi 

We must go past the vague gen- 
eralities of our younger years and re- 
study his life Our nation is a Jmmu i 
ly belter place because ol King's influ- 
ence, words and convictions Ah a col 
umiiisl I take to bean what King said. 
"Our lives begin lo end the day we be 
come silent about things that matter" 

As a Baptist preacher, King lived 
whal he preached He first achieved 



national recognition when he helped 
mobilize the boycott of the Mont 
gomery bus system in 1955 following 
Rosa Parks' now well-known refus- 
al to move to the back of the bus. King 
earned his first great victory as a civil- 
rights leader when Montgomery buses 
desegregated the following year 

King would go on to found the 
Southern Christian Leadership confer- 
ence, which mobilized black churches 
to conduct nonviolent protests. King 
would follow in this tradition for the 
rest of his short life 

One of the most striking examples 
of King's Life is the stark contrast of his 
teachings of nonviolence compared to 
that of the Vietnam War As our nation 
became increasingly agitated by the 
war, the violent mentality earned over 
into the civil- rights movement. Con- 
temporaries of King like Malcolm X 
thought violence was the quickest and 
surest way of obtaining equality King 
did not budge, and that eventually cost 
Ii ii n his life in 1968 King stood like a 
rock against the constant threat of vi- 
olence that threatened to blow up the 
movement tie helped start 

King said it much better than I 
can: "Violence as a way of achieving 
racial justice is both impractical and 
immoral It is impractical because it is 



a descending spiral ending in destruc- 
tion for all It is immoral because it 
seeks to humiliate the opponent rather 
than win his understanding, it seeks to 
annihilate rather than to convert Vio- 
lence is immoral because it thrives on 
hatred rather than love" 

Our nation does itself a disservice 
by naming schools, roads and build- 
ings after him in predominately Afri- 
can -American areas of the country. 
His name and his legacy should be eel 
ebrated in the suburbs as much as in 
the projects, and our nation should 
be bold in proclaiming the example 
of King to every person in the United 
States without regard to the color of 
their skin 

For more on the legacy of King, I 
recommend looking up his profile on 
Time magazine's Web site, www time 
com, appropriately found under the 
"Time 100 most influential people of 
the century" 

I leave you with the words of King 
in his 1964 Nobel Prize acceptance 
speech: "Nonviolence is the answer to 
the crucial political and moral ques- 
tions of our lime The need for man 
to overcome oppression and violence 
without resorting to oppression and vi- 
olence. Man must evolve for all human 
conflict a method which rejects re- 



venge, aggression and retaliation The 
foundation of such a method is love" 



Mart Wampter tt a junior Hi print journalism. Please 
send comments to opinion | spuo.ltw.edu. 




THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



THEFOURUM 

785-395 4444 

The Campus Fourum is the 

Collegian's anonymous 

i.al 1 in system The f Ourum 

is edited to eliminate vulgar, 

• obscene and libelous 

comments. The comments 

are not the opinion of the 

Collegian nor ate they 

endorsed by the editorial staff 

Hey MO We knew you had our bell 
When are you gonna give it back? Low, 
Iheta 

Screw K- Slate football Lauren Groves is 
where it'sal. 

Ijustatezitl. 

Th« Stum could ve saved Heath Ledger 

Whit Moo soon? 

Hey Collegian the ne«t time a team 
ol K State students wins a world 
(hamptonship in something, Uy writing 
an article on the team itself, not just one 
individual on the learn In othei words, 
write an article that's worth reading 

Well, my child, the Slum is the Kansas 
Slate Student Union 

The f ourum is really small Thai s what 
she said. 

Grady? What kind of a name is Grady? 

Superman k going home to relieve 
himself ot some late stress 

f i girlfriends should not shack in e«- 
boyf Mends' beds. 



Nate Schmidt | cnLUiilAN 



n. weir stuck in (he elevator Can 
you call the hie department? 

Five out ol the 10 comments in yester- 
day s f ourum were about the Stum or the 
Stum guy Seriously, people Gel a life. 

I iusi found the International Student 
Center Yeah it's pretty cool What would 
be even cooler is il I could find the John 
Deeie Student Center 

Exhibit D: Wendy Haw* writes better than 
Jonathan Wright. 

for the full F ourum, go to 

w * w M i tut Kolltfian.com. 



Collegian 



Jonathan Gartan 
(HIM. IN (W 

Saltn* Strata | MAMM EDiTOI 

Willow MMW I M/uuWJtttilOII 

Owtn Kfnrttdy | NtwS folTOD 

Hannah Slick | tOPi CulIF 

Stott Gltar d | con Mil 

AnnMtt liwlatt | MUltlMEDIA EDITM 

Snail* tllli | CAMPUS ftvtW 

Alti NakllKtlKUDHC* 

Brandon SMMtart | Mf rim EDiTM 

Ktlwy Noal | OPiMOft EDITM 

Wendy Hiun | SPOHniDllOK 

JoaiJtiiiiwi (SPonsforrM 

N I coll Jon niton | SPtMl SECTIONS EtHtM 
Tyltr Mynoldi | «i ¥»»*.«•. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

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Ked/ic 101, Manhattan, KS 66506 

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NEWSROOM 7«S-S32-6SS6- 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

the Collegian welcomes your letters to tbe 
editor They can be submitted by (-mail 
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ye ar in school and major Letters should be 
limited to 250 words. All submitted letteis 
might be edited for length and clanty 



TO THE POINT 



Graduating math teachers needed in sparse field of instructors 



Becoming a math 
teacher does not add 
up. As K-State will 
graduate a re- 
cord number 
of math teach- 
ers this spring, 
one has to won- 
der: Why would 
anybody want 
to become a 
math teach- 
er'' Math teachers are 
sometimes stereotyped 

i 



TO THt POINT is an 
editorial selected 
arid debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after 
a majority opinion 
is formed This is 
the Collegian's 
official opinion 



as teachers who do not 
care about their stu- 
dents, go over materi- 
al way too fast, 
and create an 
intense envi- 
ronment for 
slow learners 
With all 
this said, it is 
encouraging 
that students 
still want to earn a de- 
gree in math educa- 



tion. Their efforts are 
applauded, but math 
teachers still have plen- 
ty of challenges ahead. 

But are these math 
teachers from K- State 
and across the country 
ready for the challeng- 
es? 

The U.S. Depart- 
ment of Education con- 
ducted a survey in 2007 
about differences in 
elementary students 



math scores state to 
state. Compared with 
a previous survey in 
2005, Kansas improved 
its math test scores at 
grade eight but not at 
the high school lev- 
el. This is the level that 
needs the most im- 
provement. The tests 
examined different 
mathematics content in 
a variety of areas. 
According to the 



National Council of 
Teachers of Mathemat- 
ics, in the United States 
approximately 1.8 mil- 
lion elementary school 
and 225,000 second- 
ary school math teach- 
ers are needed With a 
need this large, the na- 
tional council might 
need to come up with 
some great solutions 
to its big problem The 
answer to the problem 



only will come with 
time, if the new teach- 
ers make a difference - 
in test scores and reten- 
tion rates and improvd 
the stereotype of math 
teachers, then they are 
bound to make an im- 
provement in math ed- 
ucation 

Hopefully a few 
K-State graduates will 
become part of the so- 
lution 



mm 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGES 



City's air, water clear, 
healthy for residents 



Student hopes to end poverty, attract K-Staters to group 



8y Monk* Caitro 

KANSAS STAT I COLLEGIAN 

Manhattan provides its 
residents with clean air and 
water and a safe environment 

Tom Gross, acting bureau 
chief for the Bureau of Air and 
Radiation within the Kansas 
Department of Health and En- 
vironment, said since Manhat- 
tan is a smaller city there are no 
monitoring systems that check 
the air However, as a state, the 
air quality seems lo be improv- 
ing because air regulations are 
becoming more strict 

*We think it is important 
to maintain clean air in Kan- 
sas because air pollution affects 
the young and old." Gross said. 

Gross said the Kansas City 
area meets standards of clean 
air as do other regions in Kan- 
sas 

There are continuous 
monitoring devices that check 
the air around the state. Gross 
said 

Pollutants in the air come 
from automobiles and indus 
tries, but it depends on indi- 
vidual cities in determining the 
biggest contributor of air pollu- 
tion. 

"If people are worried 
about the air they could take a 
bus, ride a bike or buy energy- 
efficient products to help the 
environment," Gross said 

Reducing the use of wood- 
burning fireplaces is an exam- 
ple to help prevent more pol- 
lutants in the air, said Steven 
Galitzer, director of the K-State 
Department of Environmental 
Health and Safety 

Galitzer has lived in bigger 
cities that had poor air quality, 
and he said he thought Man- 
hattan had clean air 

"The air in Manhattan is 
good since there are no big in- 
dustries sending out stuff in the 
air," Galitzer said. "In compari 
son to other Kansas cities, there 
is not the kind of haze here you 
would find in other places" 

Galitzer said as Manhattan 



grows into a bigger city with a 
bigger population, there might 
be more ear emissions and light 
pollution in the air 

On campus, there is an air 
quality pennit that looks at all 
emissions produced on campus 
and calculates what is being 
put into the air Galitzer said 
the campus had good air be 
cause there were no emissions 
produced beyond the permit's 
regulations 

Water on campus is also 
safe to drink because it is test- 
ed, Galitzer said 

Galitzer said people have 
called him with concerns about 
old buildings that had discol 
ored water, but he assured 
them if they let the water run it 
would become clear and safe to 
drink 

The water is brown at 
times because it has iron in it, 
Galitzer said It is safe because 
there is not a large amount of 
iron present All the older pipe 
systems on campus have been 
tested to ensure clean wBter 

"The water on campus has 
no true health hazards by the 
sanitation code." Galitzer said 

In Manhattan, Jerry Mclrt 
tyre, deputy director of Public 
Works, said water is clean and 
treated. 

"The water is regulated 
by the state's Department of 
Health and Environment as 
safe lo drink." Mclntyre said 

Mclntyre said since Man- 
hattan is bigger than some 
Kansas cities, there are more 
sophisticated systems treating 
the water and softening the wa- 
ter. 

"Softening the water is re- 
moving the hardness of wa 
ter, which is removing miner- 
als such as calcium and magne- 
sium," Mclntyre said 

Mclntyre said drinking 
water with calcium and mag- 
nesium are not hazardous to a 
person's health, but they are re- 
moved for washing purposes 

"Water in Manhattan is 
high quality," Mclntyre said 



By David Griffin It. 

KANSAS SI AIHntl.l-.GlAN 

One person dies every 
three seconds from pover- 
ty, hunger, lack of clean wa 
ter and/or HIV/ AIDS, said 
the president of the K-State 
chapter of a poverty fighting 
organization. 

David Westfall, graduate 
student in sociology and pres 
ident of the K State chapter 
ol the organization ONE, re 
cently joined more than 120 
student activists from across 
the United States at a special 
summit on ending poverty, 
the ONE Power 100 Summit 
from )an 2 5, in Washington. 
DC. 

Westfall came back to 
campus inspired to get stu- 
dents involved in the ONE 
Campus Challenge The chal- 
lenge is to get universities 
connected with the national 
ONE campaign by participat- 
ing in more than 100 activi 
ties, which earn universities 
points The lop 10 universi- 
ties will be included in an all- 
university vote to earn a con 
cert by a top recording artist 
at the winning campus 

Amanda Staats. fresh 
man in pre- professional busi- 
ness administration and a 
member of the organization 
of ON E, said it is an easy way 
to change the world 

"People should try (the 
ONE organization) because 
its a simple way to make a 
difference and get the mes- 
sage out there," Staats said. 

Westfall will recruit stu- 
dents to participate in the ac- 
tivities during the chapter's 
first meeting at 5 30 p.m 
Jan 29 in the K State Stu 
dent Union Food Court. 

The K-State chapter will 



work with surrounding uni- 
versities like Kansas, Mis 
suuri, Colorado and Missouri 
State The chapter is ranked 
No 26 out of 1,300 active 
universities. 

Westfall said he fosters a 
passion about raising aware- 
ness at different universities 
to connect to the larger cam- 
paign. 

"Here at K State we 
have a large group of pas- 
sionate people," Westfall said 
Th# problem is people don't 
know about the issues Even 
though we have our problems 
here, there's a larger picture 
at hand." 

He said there are Amer- 
icans who are impoverished. 
and the government needs to 
get involved. 

Westfall said the ONE 
campaign is nonpartisan 

"There is only ONE side 
to the fight against poverty." 
he said 

There are 2 5 million 
members involved with the 
the ONE campaign world- 
wide. More than 100 of the 
most respected nonprofit or 
ganizations are working to- 
ward achieving the eight mil- 
lennium development goals 
end hunger, establish uni- 
versal education, gender eq- 
uity, child health, maternal 
health, combat HIV/AIDS, 
environmental sustainabih- 
ty and global partnership, ac- 
cording to the organization's 
Web site 

More than 188 countries 
have signed on to work to- 
ward these goals lo end glob 
a I poverty, Westfall said. 

Less than 1 percent of 
the US budget is spent on is- 
sues like poverty With pres- 
idential calls, some candi- 
dates have promised to do- 




Jonathan Knight | I 01 1 K.IAN 

David Wattfall, graduate student in sociology and leader of the 
K-State ONE Campaign againit poverty, holds a $1 btll representing 
the 1 billion people who live on Si a day Another 2 billion people 
live on less than $2 a day. 



nate more than S50 billion 
Supporters also include U2 
singer Bono and former Sen- 
ate Majority Leaders Rill 
Frist and Tom Daschle, West- 
fall said 

The International Moni 
tor Fund had to shut its Web 
site down because ol the 



amount of e-mails it received 
and because of the lack of 
ability lo respond to every- 
one, Westfall said. 

This chapter will go a 
long way with the help from 
the national chapter and the 
students on our campus," 
Staats said. 





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mm 



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:3 II 



PAGE 6 



NFL'sbig 

game a 

'Super' 

bust 



As I watched the NFL 
Conference Championships 
last weekend. I realized a lot 
of people's 




MIKE 
OEVAOER 



fmrtl were 

crushed be- 
cause the Su- 
per BOWl th.il 

many viewers 
Minted to see 
isn't going In 
happen. 

I was 
rooting lor 
the Green 
Bay Puckers 
and the San 

Diego Chargers lo play in Su- 
per Bow! XIII because I am 
nut a fun of Eli Manning and 
the New York Giants or the 
New England Patriots I am a 
fan of Randy Moss, and if I was 
in his position, I would have 
bolted from the Oakland Raid- 
ers in go to a dominating team 
like the l*atriotsas well 

I have never liked the Pa 
Wots, even bet i j re they were 
winning Super Bowls, simply 
because of who is representing 
their team 

Seriously, what kind of 
head coach cuts off the sleeves 
of a hooded sweatshirt and 
thinks he looks respectable? 

Safety Rodney Harri- 
son is one ol the dirtiest play- 
ers in the game, hut he is good, 
so I respect him 'The Patriots 
beat I' inner K State star run 
ning back Darren Sproles and 
the San Diego Chargers Un- 
fortunately, this UXW twn any 
possibility of a former Wildcat 
winning a ring this year 

The Super Bowl is sup- 
posed lo be a marquee match 
up everyone wants lo see F.v 
ery year, this game is watched 
with great interest worldwide 
on the first Sunday of February 
It would hate been much more 
entertaining lo sec the gun- 
shriget Bret! law.' try lo upend 
ihe unbeaten Patriots in the 
championship In lact. (he last 
time Havre played the Palrioi> 
in the Super Howl, he won 

This Super Bowl, however, 
could be tlie most boring Super 
Bowl since I was bom Plus n I 
one should want to watch a re- 
match of teams who fust placed 
in week 17 

The game that solidified 
the Patriots perfect regular sea- 
son was a close call, but the 
Super Bowl in Arizona will 
be Ihe polar opposite The Ci 
ants had all the advalilages the 
last time these two teams met 
and they failed to get a victo- 
ry. This game will not be pret 
ly if you're a Giants Ian Cold 

ilier lias slimed the Patri- 
ot* offense this season, but the 
Giants can no lunger depend 
on ihe road terror they have 
been on 

Hie Pa i riots are going to 
come out a anting lo avenge 
one of their closest calls to a 
loss this year, and as much as 1 
tin 1 1 to uimit n 1 have a feeling 
it is destiny for us to see them 
run the table 

I'm thinking the Patriots 
win by more llian three touch 
downs and become the Rm 
team in NFL hisiuii to finish I 
pertei t NM hi 1 it h I record of 
194 



Mike OVddei ft * wflior in e twtronii 
journalism. PInm »nd comments to 
tporti << tpuft.kiu.fdu. 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



Flawless 



Women improve 
record to 5-0 in Big 
1 2 conference play 



By Mike DeVader 

KANSAS STOfcUlLLEGIAN 

It took junior guard 
Shalee Lehning and the 
Wildcats just seven sec- 
onds to crush any hopes 
Iowa State had of getting 
a win 

Lehning hit a 3 -point 
er on the opening posses- 
sion and K Stale was off 
and running to a 80 49 
victory at Bramlage Col- 
iseum Senior guard Kim 
berly Dielz led the Wild- 
cats once again in scor- 
ing with 16 points and 
two assists. Not too far 
off was Lehning, who had 
another double double, 
dropping 12 points and 
10 assists. Junior forward 
Marlies Gipsun also had 
12 points while senior 
forward Shana Wheeler 
added nine 

KState (13-5, 5 
Big 12 Conference) has 
been a good three -point 
shooting team this year, 
but on Wednesday, affin- 
ity for making shots be- 
hind the arc was even 
higher The Wildcats hil 
12 of 21. which amount 
ed to 571 percent. Coach 
Deb Patterson said the 
Wildcats shot well, and 
the amount of threes hit 
in this game has been a 
reoccurring theme when 
the Wildcats and Cy- 
clones play. 

"When Iowa State 
and Kansas State play, it's 
likely to see a fair number 
of threes." Patterson said 
"The team played well lo 
gether on the offensive 



end. and we made good 
decisions tonight'' 

KState played sti- 
fling defense the whole 
game, going on runs of 
14-0 and 17-0, one in each 
half of play. The Wildcats 
are 5-0 in conference play 
for the first time since the 
2002-2003 season 

KState held the Cy- 
clones to only 36- percent 
shooting for the game and 
30 8 percent from behind 
the arc Patterson said 
she was pleased with the 
style of defense the Wild 
cats played in the game 

"Defensively. we 
brought a great effort to 
the floor," Patterson said 
■Defensively, we thought 
we defended the three- 
ball" 

K-Stale is ranked 
at the top of the confer- 
ence standings with Bay 
lor, who is also 5-0 in the 
Big 12. K Stale will face 
Oklahoma State in Still 
water, Okla., Sunday. The 
Cowboys are fresh off 
their 70-63 victory over 
Texas on Wednesday and 
are 4-1 in conference 
play 

Though KState re 
ceived a No. 22 ranking 
by the Associated Press 
last week, Lehning said 
the' team isn't letting its 
ranking change the game 
plan 

"[Oklahoma State] is 
a tough and disciplined 
team," Lehning said 
"We have the same focus 
we've had - being ranked 
doesn't mean anything at 
this point" 




Marltts 
Glpson 

shoots ovef 
an towa State 
defensive 
player Gipson 
had he r fifth 
double - 
double of the 
season, adding 

1 2 points and 

13 rebounds 
in the Wildcat 
victory. 



Joslyn Brown 
an.Lfci.IAN 



K-State rolls to 3-0 conference record, defeats 1-3 Colorado on road 



By Wendy HMD 
KAMMSSIU1 . ;■]! h.IAN 

Freshman forward Mi 
chael Beasley was nine of 17 
from the floor and logged 29 
points to lead KState to a 72- 
56 win over Colorado in Boul- 
der 

Beasley. who also had 13 
rebounds, was joined in dou- 
ble figures in scoring by fresh- 
man forward Bill Walker, who 
had 18 points and was five of 
sis from the free-throw line 

Colorado played K State 
close in the first half, taking 
the lead with 14 10 left in the 
first half. KState responded 
and went on a 25-1 scoring 
streak that ate up six minutes 
of the clock Colorado closed 
the gap to eight at the end of 
the first half, capped off by a 
field goal from senior guard 
Richard Roby with 30 sec- 
onds left 

In the second half, Col- 
orado trimmed the K Stale 
le.ul eoniing within lour with 
17 48 left Beasley responded 
once again, getting 26 of his 29 
points in the second half. Out 
of the next 12 KState points, 
Beasley scored eight K State's 



largest lead was 20 when Bea 
sley made a layup with 1 23 
left lo make the score 72 52 

Colorado was led in 
scoring by Roby who had 27 
points Roby, who has been 
averaging 16 points and six 
rebounds this season, also 
had nine rebounds He has 
reached 27 points in two oth- 
er games this season : against 
Tulsa on Jan. 7 and New Or- 
leans on Dec. 12. 

Also in double -figures for 
the Buffaloes was freshman 
guard Cory Higgins who had 
10 points Higgins has been 
averaging eight points per 
game and four rebounds. 

KState was 21 of -29 
from the free- throw line, 
which was considerably better 
than Colorado The Buffaloes 
went to the line 31 times and 
only converted 17 attempts 

Wednesday's game was 
the first time since the Xavi 
er game on Dec. 31 that the 
Wildcats have shot less than 
50 percent from field goal 
range for the game KState 
shot 42 percent from the floor 
and was 27 percent from be 
yond the arc 

KState improves to 13-4 




Freshman forward Bill Wilk«r dribbles past Texas A&M's Joseph Jones Jan. 19. 



M*tt C«tra | OILLtt.lAN 



on the year and is 3-0 in the* ference play was during the 
Big 12 Conference. The last 1987-1988 season. Colorado 
time K State was 3-0 in con falls to 9-9 on the year and 



1-3 in Big 12 play K-Statewill 
face Iowa Stale at 5 p m Sat- 
urday in Bramlage Coliseum 




Beasley on watch list 
of several season awards 



Joslyn Brown | i OUHiiAS 

MichMl Beasley goes op for » 
shot against Western lllmois'Larry 
Dumas. Beasley, who has been 
averaging 25 points a game, was 
named to two watch lists this 
week 



K Stale's standout fresh 
man forward Michael Beasley 
has come out on top of two 
more collegiate awards watch 
lists 

Beasley was voted to the 
No. 1 spol on the Wooden 
Watch this week. The Wooden 
Watch is a weekly prediction 
of who will prevail at the end 
of the season as the NCAA's 
mosl outstanding player The 
Wooden Award is awarded 
based on a vole from a pan- 
el that includes college basket- 
ball analysts, writers and col- 
umnists This is the first week 
Beasley has been ranked No 
1 on the list 

Beasley was also named 
to the Naismith "Trophy mid- 



season 30 list The list, whkh 
is comprised of the best 30 
players in the NCAA, is vot- 
ed on by a "voting academy," 
which is comprised of basket- 
ball writers, coaches and ad- 
ministrators around the coun- 
try When the academy re- 
leased its preseason list, Bea- 
sley could not be voted onto 
the watch list. Last season. 
the Naismith Trophy went to 
a freshman for the first time 
in the history of die award - 
Texas' Kevin Durant The Nai- 
smith Trophy will be presented 
following the NCAA Tourna 
ment and will have fan voles 
factored in with the academy's 
final ballots 

— K-Slatf Sports Infomwtion 

t 



I U Pill's Hunter to coach barefoot to raise awareness 



IHlANMlUAIHi ma 

INDIANAPOLIS - For 
once, Ron Hunter won't be 
able to stomp 

Hunter will coach bare- 
foot in lUPUI's game against 
Oakland University on Thurs- 
day to raise awareness for chil 
dren in need. His goal is lo 
send 40,000 pairs of shoes to 
Africa in honor of the 40th an- 
niversary of the death of Dr 
Martin Luther King |r. 

"If a five- or six-year-old 
kid can walk around their en 
tire life with no shoes on, then 
surely, in a warm climate, in a 
basketball environment. I can 
do it," he said "They may not 
hear my stomps like they usu- 
ally do" 

Hunter is working through 
a Charlulte. N.C., charitable 



organization called Samari- 
tan's Feet, which was found- 
ed four years ago by Emman- 
uel "Manny" Ohonme 

A native of Nigeria. 
Ohonme received his first pair 
of shoes at the age of 9 from 
an American missionary He 
eventually earned a scholar 
ship lo play basketball at Lake 
Region State College in North 
Dakota 

Samaritan's Peel wants to 
send 10 million pairs of shoes 
to children around the world 
in 10 years 

Hunter said he learned 
about Samaritan's Feel after 
a mutual friend gave his num- 
ber to Ohonme Samaritan's 
Feet came up with the idea for 
Hunter to go without shoes 

"They told me the idea, 
and at first I kind of laughed, 



because 1 thought surely they 
were joking about that," he 
said "But they weren't" 

Then. Hunter remem- 
bered a recruiting trip to La- 
gos, Nigeria, four years ago. 
where he saw examples of ex- 
treme poverty That, the call 
from Ohonme and prayer were 
enough to persuade him to go 
shoeless for a night. 

Hunter told his team 
about the mission, and it 
moved freshman Christian 
Siakam, who is from Camer- 
oon. 

"He said a lot of col 
lege athletes, when they get 
their free pair of shoes, they 
take those things for granted 
There's so many kids, includ- 
ing people in his family, that 
don'l have shoes It's hitting 
home with him," Hunter said 



««■■■■«■■«««■ 



m 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE? 



World briefs 



EXPLOSION IN BAGHDAD 
KILLS 17 

BAGHDAD - A thun- 
derous blast lore through a 
vacant apartment building in 
northern Iraq on Wednesday, 
killing at least 1? civilians snd 
wounding more than 130 in 
adjacent houses just minutes 
after the Iraqi army arrived to 
investigate tips about a weap 
ons cache 

Rescue crews searched 
under toppled walls, col 
lapsed ceilings and piles of 
debris tossed by the explosion 
that blew apart the empty 
building, which Iraqi author- 
ities said was used by insur- 
gents to stash weapons and 
bombs 

The hunt through the 
wreckage stretched for hours, 
raising the possibility the final 
casualty loll could climb. The 
huge blast went off just after 
the troops arrived, and no sol 
dier was reported killed 

Instead, the explosion 
ravaged dozens of old homes 
and collapsed a three-sto- 
ry building In a mostly Sun- 
ni neighborhood in Mosul, 
about 225 miles northwest of 
Baghdad. 

The blast also reinforced 
U.S. claims this week that 
Mosul - Iraq's third largest 
city - is now the last urban 
center with a strong presence 
of al-Qaida in Iraq American 
and Iraqi forces have been on 
the offensive against insur- 



gents in and around Baghdad, 
but Mosul continues to be a 
center of gravity for al-Qaida 
in Iraq, according to the mili- 
tary. 

AFGHAN PRESIDENT 
WARNS OF INSTABILITY 

DAVOS, Switzerland 

Afghanistan's president 
warned Wednesday that the 
whole world could suffer 
from the "wildfire" of terror- 
ism engulfing his region, a 
grim message for a meeting 
of political and business lead- 
ers already fretting over the 
threat of global recession. 

Formally opening the 
World Economic Forum. 
Hamid Karzai gave a sober- 
ing rundown of recent attacks 
attributed to Islamic extrem- 
ists - among them the assas- 
sination of Benazir Bhutto 
and bombings in Afghanistan 
and Pakistan that have killed 
hundreds, including many 
children. 

With militant violence 
still on the rise in the two na- 
tnmji six years after the ouster 
of the Taliban, "it seems like 
the mutant of extremism is 
dangerously unleashed across 
the region.' Karzai said The 
trend "bodes terribly badly for 
the whole world," he said. 

In an apparent allusion 
to Pakistan - whose presi- 
dent. Pervez Musharraf, orig- 
inally supported the Taliban 
- Karzai called terrorism "a 




venomous snake that some 

among us tried to nurture and 
befriend at the expense of 
others, which I hope we real- 
ize now was a mistake" 

AFGHAN JOURNALIST 
SENTENCED TO DEATH 
FOR BROTHER'S CRIME 

KABUL, Afghanistan - 
An Afghan journalist who was 
sentenced to death for dis- 
tributing an article about Is- 
lam and women's rights is ac- 
tually being punished for his 
brother's reporting on abus 



es by warlords, a media group 
said Wednesday 

Sayed Parwez Kaam- 
bakhsh. 23, was sentenced 
to death Tuesday by a three- 
judge panel in the northern 
city of Mazari- Sharif for dis- 
tributing a report he printed 
off the Internet to fellow jour- 
nalism students at Belkh Uni- 
versity. 

The article asks why men 
can have four wives but wom- 
en can't have multiple hus- 
bands It was written in the 
Iranian language of Farsi, 



which is similar to the Afghan 
language of Dari. 

The judges said the ar- 
ticle humiliated Islam, and 
members of a clerics council 
had pushed for Kaambakhsh 
to be punished. The case now 
goes to the first of two ap- 
peals courts. 

Jean Mackenzie, coun- 
try director for the Institute 
for War and Peace Report- 
ing, which helps train Afghan 
journalists, said Kaambakhsh 
was being punished for sto- 
ries written for IWPR by his 



brother, Sayed Yaqub tbrahi- 
mi. 

"We feel very strongly 
that this is a complete fabri- 
cation on the part of the au- 
thorities up in Mazar, de- 
signed to pul pressure on Par- 
wez' brother Yaqub, who has 
done some of the hardest hit- 
ting pieces outlining abuses 
by some very powerful com- 
manders in Balkh and the 
other northern provinces," 
MacKenzie said 

— A»<Ki»t*d Pr«i 






Your professor may not 

always be there for you. 

• 

Your roommates might not 

always be there for you 

+■ • - 

And your family, well you 

can't really trust them 

either. 

But the Collegian 
"Vossword. . \ 

Now that's something you can bank on. 

Uctt.d on pt|< tve of tb* c«ll*|iu terivit md tlviji 




Agri-Industry 



X 



CAREER FAIR 

what: 

Meet with repf esentattves ftorn a variety 

of agricultural-related organizations to 

learn about jobs and internships! 

when: 
Tuesday, January 29 
11:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. 

where: 

K-Slate Student Union Ballroom 

Questions? 

CjfCW and f mplo*™nt S*f*(tM 

hjnut Stat* Unftvritty 

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LENSES INCLUDE 
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What do Hayden and McLovin' 
have in common? 







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CORNER OF WESTLOOP SHOPPING CENTER 

785-537-1574 



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ALL NORMAL RX'S INCLUDED UP TO A + OR -8 00 DIOPTER SPHERE 

AND A -2 DIOPTER CYLINDER ADDS UP TO 3 00. PLASTIC LENSES ONLY FREE 

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YOUR DR'S PRESCRIPTION WELC OME 



They both registered to vote through: 



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in the Kansas primary : 

Democrats: Jan. 21 st 
Republicans: Jan. 25 th 

Easy online registration! 



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WWW.DECUREY0URSHF.COM 



KU 



J 



mmmmmmmM 



PAGE 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



HOMELESS | solutions 
coming for homeless 



ConHntwdfmmP»9f1 

has noted a significant in- 
crease in the occurrence of 
homelessness in Manhat- 
tan, especially in the last two 
years 

"(Homcleuness is] hard 
to measure, but we have been 
at capacity and have turned 
away more than 400 people 
in the past two years" Sem 
pie said 

Scmple also said the need 



for proper shelter is much 
greater now and the shel- 
ter is seeing more families in 
distress Several factors con- 
tribute to the rise of home 
lessnesa, including lack of af 
fordable housing, shortage of 
daycare and wages that are 
too low to accommodate cost 
of living, she said 

"We are trying to look 
at creating solutions, and we 
need support from the com- 
munity," Scmple said 



• 



I 



o k 



we've got the stories you've got to read. 



Get your Royal Purple yearbook 
m Kedzie 103. or call S32-6555. 



1204 Mora 






SJ7S9IO 



Thursday 
Party Pic Night 

I omt be * part of Avjflrvi I If h litery by 

frtflnf you end your rrltmk parly 

pirtum pottrMl on our w*\h 

M.00 Bottles 

■ ud. Bud Light ■ua SiUl t > 

S I >■, Bud Light Wit 1 1 

in Price Margaritas 

$2 Imports and Micros 

l J Price Salsatt 

Wow Hiring! 



Ad It Up 



? 



Talk with one 

of our advertising 

sales representatives 

by calling... 

785-532-6560 



- Thursdays - 

/K 10 pm Texas Hold em 

mik) Monthly Prize 

f 1.99 DRAFTS "hobnyivtonr 
$3.00 BACARDI DRINKS 
$2.50 PINTS 





$5.99 BURGER-N-BEER 

^ftrj'i ll4a MmhaM ,u F nur It iiikIU'huihII MStirHHIl 




vi\t\\ Purchase 

drink - » *tta 




OtHZeJuuts 

The perfect 

way to start 

your day! 



EFttnk 



■ ■ mm j: 



Travel lite wcrk) with 

lags students hrvn ai 

over rhr» country 

ItSlun US easy 

It's aHootoUe 

tifc Urns to travel 









January 31 

SAVE cvr-n moro! 




Save Si 50 

February 15! 



v-wi j. ,i atcotlegebreak. com /first * BOO. 7 66.2645 




psas state sororities 

e gree 

come find out what we're about, 

take a to .9 greek community as 

Ihe panhelkjt «n recfiiitment on 

januar, a meet, members from 

J C sororities 

information sessions 

in 0' 33 at noon & 

?rroom I20at8p.m 

1 24 
m, 4 2p m. 






open house 

'. loop & ford hall 
m 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 




Bulletin Board 



A VERY nice one-bed- 
room Close to campus 
arid Aggtovffle. New paint, 
carpet and appliance* 
Available now' No pel* 
785-338- 1 1 24. 



APPLY ONLINE! One to 
tour -bedroom apartments, 
LEARN TO FLY 1 K State studio* and tote available 




Flying Club has live air 
planet and lowest rates 
Call 785-776 1744 www 
ksuedu&stc 



iatmafomut 



LOST KEYS Three braw 
and one Volvo car key 
H award I1U0K18 V *u edu 
or 630-605-8304 




Housing Real Estate 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 461 a assure* ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity In housing with 
out dleiloctlon on ac- 
count 0! race, ten tarn it 
lai atalua, military tta- 
lua. disability, religion, 
age. color, national ori- 
gin or enceetry Viola 
lion* thould be re 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resources el 
City Hall, 7BS-M7-2440 




MANHATTAN CrTY Or* 
nance 4114 iiiurn ev- 
ery peraon equal oppor 
I unity In housing with 
out distinction on ac- 
count ot race, sex, femll 
let status, military eta 
tue. dlaatMllty, religion, 
age, color, national ori- 
gin or anceetry Viola- 
tion* thouid be re- 
ported lo the Director ot 
Human Reeourcaa el 
CHyHeli 7S5-W7 2440 



January or Auguat 2006 
Visn u* at housing k-state 
edu or can 785-632-3790 
lo sei up a lour 

BflANO NEW luxury apart 
mania ctoee lo campus 
Granite oouroertope, stem 
leas appaancee, washed 
dryer, pool, hot tub. gym, 
theater 
TBS-537-2098 ooeegial 
evl6a.com 

ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartmenia m new build 
mg». Close ID campus 
and AggievMe Available 
June and August 2006 
No pets Call John at 785 
313-7473 

ONE-BEOflOOM COZY 
apartment, one Mock from 
campus 1500; month. In- 
cludes ulthUam Call 785- 
770-0491. 

PARK PLACE Apartments 
summer tall leasing Best 
deal in town on one and 
two-bedroom Student 

specials it leased by 
Februarys 765-538- 29S1 

THREE-BEDROOM 
JUNE/ August lessee 
One block to campus/ Ag- 
tjmville Central an, fun 
kitchens washer/ dryer on 
•its 765-539-4641 



NOW LEASING 
FOR FALL 



■ am Ai» 

Sill I. Hi 

Sand 
Pi i 



Spacious 
Duplexes 



Each duplex features 

walk in closets, 

all kitchen appliances, 

was tier /dryer. 

off street parking. 

phone and cable 

connecBonj in every room, 

security lighting, 

trash and lawn care 

Set unty deposit is the same 
as qui month's rem 

One Year Lease period 
begins August 1st 

4 Styl&t 

4 Bedrooms, 2 Btthi 
2,600 Sq Ft 

id uj i...i'..].. 

1 Living Rooms .' 
oppii d*ck Lirga study 
ohlice. Structured cable, 
Spat in ot laundry room 
ONLrtl.tavVmo 

4 Bed rooms . 7 Baths 

1,800 Sq Ft 

Hacmnda 

1 Living Rooms Spacious 

laundry room 

ONLY tt.2S0/mo 

4 Bedrooms. ! Baths 

1.600 Sq Ft 

2 Lev* Is Study a Mice 

0NLY11.i»rro 

4 Bedrooms. 2 Baths 

1,300 Sq Ft 

QNIYi I, ISO/mo 



■ease Wseatsss rt k e ea t 



amy- If 3-0791 
|M'-4SI1 



AVAILABLE NEXT school 
year Three to elgtit-bed- 
room nouses All have run 
kitchen, washer' dryer. 
central air. Can now lor 
besi selection www fore- 
mostproperty.com. 785- 
539-4641 

HOUSES MANY sires 
and prices. June or Au- 
gust 765-341-0686 

LARGE FOUR-BED 

ROOM, two bathroom 
carpeted rec room. Near 
AggkMMs/ campus 
tral ■•>. waaher/ dryer, die 
posal. tiraplace. garage 
Available now, 
terms negotiable 765-317- 
5488 

ONE. TWO, three, and 
tour-bedroom house* 
Close to campus/ alao 
weal a Me. Available im 
mediately No pelt. 785 
539-1975 or 789-313- 
MM, 



FOR SALE 1995 Uberty 
mobile home t6«76. two- 
bedroom, two bath with 
shad 915.000 765-494. 
6464 five miles east ol 
Manhattan in nice park 

FOR SALE: Beautiful two 
bedroom, one bath. I4i 
65 mobile home, two car 
carport. partially lur 
ntaheO, garden tub, all ap- 
pliances, large shed and 
deck Possible owner fi- 
nancing 910,500 Walnut 
Grove (785)-565-2483 



THREE FEMALE interna- 
tional graduate students 
locking lor roommate at 
U n ivervty Crossing www - 
ucmanhatlan.com. Call 
712-261.7877 or e-mail 
ruppmalissawgmsil com 





ONE, TWO, three, lour, 
five. and. six -bedroom 
apartments and house* 
available tor June and Au- 
gust 765-539-6295 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted as soon as poaal- 
ble 9300 per month plus 
halt utilities Own room 
and parking. Please call 
at8 204-7206 

FEMALE ROOMMATF 
wanted to shir* house 
with (amain and male 
S3Q0V month Utilities 
paid Cell 765-537-4947 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to live with two 
clean, fnanrjly girl* Spa- 
cious (trw b adj a o i it 



FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed Four -bedroom, 
two bath apartment 9310 
plus uWrbes Very close to 
campuil Available now 
January rent free 1 Call 
Katie 316-644-0268 

ONE -BEDROOM IN Iwo- 
bedroom house. Great 
roommate February 1- 
June t. $385 par month 



internet/ cable Close to 
campus. Pnce nego- 

tiable 785-427-6636 

SUBLEASER NEEDED in 
a two-bedroom apart- 
ment Includes washer' 
dryer, water and trash 
paid <> 9315.' month plus 



IjMltf)!- 

0512 



Call 765 620 




•COMPLETE LIST of 
house* close to campus 
tor sale lerryiimbcck- 
errj? reecean dn ichol* . com 
765-317 7713 Corner- 
seone Realty 




1999 OAKWCOD three- 
bedroom, two-bath walk 
in doeeta, garden tub. 
shed Located in Walnut 
Grove 16.000 or beet ot- 
ter. Can 785-317 4589 



LET'S HELP OUR 

LOCAL CHARITIES. 



Open Sat urda» m;j 

537-9064 

m ft 1 1 1 Ffivtsst j r.<3 renTdl curr 

I I 






Please consider a 

contribution to support 

our local charities. 



THINK GLOBALLY. 

ACT LOCALLY. 



dryer dishwasher and 
garage Close to the sta- 
dium 9386/ month 786- 
17 It 35 

LWKINCi FOR female 
grad student to share 
three-bedroom two bath- 
room house 9350 Lease 
6 move-In date neiible E- 
(nan eterseneksu edu 

MALE ROOMMATE 
wanted House three 
blocks from campus 
9325 00 plus one-fourth at 
utilities Call 820.228. 
1345 

ROOM FOR Renv Univer- 
sity Gardens Two-bed- 
room/ two bath Share 
with male grad student. 
Rent is 9260 plus utilities 
Contact me at tiarychrtstl- 
neaandnefi3yahoo.com 
or 913-620-0579. 

ROOMMATE NEEOEO 
Nice, spacious three-bed- 
room house 9350/ month 
plus bills Available imme- 
diatery. Call 620-654.7696 

ROOMMATE WANTEO 
as soon aa posaibtel One 
block from campusl You 
win have your own bed- 
room and own fun bath- 
room i With washer/ dryer, 
dishwasher, and fireplace 
Water and trash paid tori 
II intarsated call Caml al 
785-747^742 or email 
me c2|»V*u edu 



SUBLEASER NEEDED 
through May or July with 
option to renew lor follow 
Ing year 1 Three-bedroom 
house with private room, 
washer' dryer, wireless In- 
ternet, digital cable with 
DVR. 9275 rent plus unti- 
tles on average (960) ca- 
ble and Internet Included 
Move m Today' 719-432- 
7015 




THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial po- 
of adv*nl»e- 
In the Employ- 
Cereer c tea* If Ice- 



vised to approach any 
such bualnees opportu- 
nity with reasonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian 
urges our reader* to 
contact the Better Bual- 
nees Bureeu, 501 SE Jef- 
ferson, Topeka. KS 
66*07 1190 785-212- 

0454 



A WELL established, pro- 
lessional landscaping 

company is seeking a reli- 
able individual lor full-time 
employment m their land- 
scape installation dhrtaton 
Prior landscape or term 
experience preferred 

Above average wages 
commensurate with expe- 
nencs and ability Benelits 
include major medical, 
paid leave and 401 « Ap- 
ply in person at 11524 
Landscape Ln , St 
George KS 68535 765- 
494-2418 or 785-776- 
0397 

ACCOUNTANT/ CFO 

Due to our continued 
growth, CMoPtua. the na- 
tion's leading provider of 
City. County, and School 
wabitei. has an opening 
tot a M-tjme accountant 
This career position re- 
quires the ability to handle 
multiple task* and priori- 
ties while maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Accounting expen 
ence a required, 

Peachtree eipertence pre- 
lerred Competitive pay 
plus benefits including 
Health. Denial. Paid Mon- 
davi. Paid Vacation and 
401 K Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or Texl tor- 
met to: 
jobs 9c*vtcphj* com 

ACCOUNTING CLERK 
pan-lime with USD 383 
Business Office 97 00 per 
hour Twenty hours per 
week during school year, 
full-time summer hours 
High school graduate or 
equivalent computet 

skills including experience 
with Excel, working knowl- 
edge ol office procedures 
and equipment, basic ac- 
counting ekHts Job de- 
scription available Appii 
cation* accepted until po- 
sition It lilted Apply to 
Manhattan Ogden USD 
383, 2031 Poynti Ave. 
Manhattan, KS 66602 
785-587.2000 Equal Op- 
portunity Employer 



IT 

Advertise in 
the Classifieds 

Call 



ADMISSIONS REPRE- 
SENTATIVE Kansas 
State University is recruit 
ing tor at least one and 
poaatbry several positions 
ot Admissions Represen- 
tative These individuals 
are responsible tor the de- 
velopment and impiumen- 
lation ol an effective stu- 
dent recruitment program 
withm a specific geo- 
graphic region The major 
responsMtie* include 
Coordinating strategy and 
resource people for the le- 
gion: serving as the pri- 
mary recruitment repre- 
sentative developing and 
maintaining service tela- 
with high 
and community 
coeeges: attending major 
community events, and co- 
ordlnallng efforts tor the 
region with K Stale faculty 
and staff Qualifications in- 
clude a recent K-Stste 
bachelor's degree famil- 
iarity and excitement lor K- 
Slale. demonstrated aca- 
demic success and stu- 
dent Involvement/ leader- 
ship skills In student 
groups and organized liv- 
ing: strong communication 
tknit loraf written): strong 
social skits tor a variety ot 
srtuattons: ability lo work 
Independently. overall 
high energy level and en- 
thusiasm: wMngness to 
travel extensively: and a 
vahd drivers license At 
leaat one successful can- 
didate should have native 
or near-native Spanish 
language proficiency One 
admttsions representative 
will be located In Dallas 
Texas, and represent the 
university in the slate ol 
Texas Applicants wanting 
lo be considered tor the 
Texas admlssiona repre- 
sentative position should 
indicate so in their letter ol 



start July 1, 2006, and 
pay 930 500 lor twelve 
months Candidate should 
send a letter of applies 
Won. retume. trenBCripi(s) 
and the name* and phone 
numbers ot three refer- 
ences to Search Commit- 
tee. Now Student Set- 
vices, Kanta* State Uni- 
versity, 122 Anderson 
Hall. Manhattan, KS 
66506 Application dead 
line is January 25. 2008 
Kansas State University Is 
an Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer and actively seeks 
diversity among ns em- 
pkyyeea. Pajd tor by 
Kansas State University. 



APPOINTMENT SET- 

TER: CivicPlus is the na- 
tions leading provider ol 
City, County and School 
websites We have luU 
and part-time positions m 
Manhattan with significant 
income potential lor the 
right individual This posi- 
tion Involves ceiling poten- 
tial caerits to setup webi- 
nar appointments. Pay it 
910V hour plus 940 for 
each webmai appoint- 
ment you setup Fun-time 
benefits include Health. 
Denial. Paid Holidays, 
Paid Vacation and 40 1K 
matching Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or Texl 
formal to 
lobe ecivicplus com 



ASSISTANT TENNIS 

COACH, Eisenhower Mid 
die School Salary sat by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spnrig season Accepting 
resume* or letters with 
qualifications until position 
la tilled Apply lo Man hat 
tart-Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poynti Ave. Manhat- 
tan. KS 66502 785-567. 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 



BARTENDING! 9300 A 
day potential No expen- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 1-800-985- 
6520 eat. 144 



BILLING COORDINA- 
TOR: Due to our contin- 
ued growth. ClvtcPlus, the 
nation's leading provider 
ol City, County, and 
School website*, has an 
opening tor ■ rul-time 
Billing Coordinator This, 
exerting opportunity ps> 
quires me ability lo handle 
mt*lple leak* and priori- 
ties what maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Comoefrtrye pay 
plus benelits including 
Health. Dental. Paid Holi- 
days, Paid vacation and 
40 IK Email resume m Mi- 
crosoft Word oi Text for- 
mat to 
jabsectvlcplua.com 



CMIPOTLE. yvORK at 1 
piece where you actually 
want to eat the loodl 
Chrpotie is now hmng all 
positrons Free food, flexi- 
ble hours Apply i p m Us 
5 pm Monday through 
Fnday 785-587 8029 



I 



mm 



MiMMMMMMMi 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 

785-532-6555 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



page 9 



- II II 



1 1 ■ i ii 



LET'S RENT 



Unfurn ished Rent-Apt Unfurnished 



ONE, TWO. m thrse- 
fcedroom apartments ax 
ceilent condWon Meit to 
K-Stete and AggieveVj iw 
e onable rata* private 
parting, eflentfve land- 
lord, no pals June ana 
August leasee TNT 
I 785-539-5508 



ONE. TWO, end three- 
badroarn apartments new 
construction next to K- 
State and Aggieville up- 
scale Mtw epanments 
washer' dryer, 
washer, central all pri- 
vate parking, security light 
log. no pets. June and Au- 
gust Mut TNT Rentala 
7B5-539-5508 



AUGUST PRELEASEING 
serval unit! close to KSU 
Some only one year old 
All apHances inducing 
washer,' dryer eneigv efli- 
cant opertmanls off street 
parking call tot location/ 
prices 7BS- 776- Z 1 02 www - 
wilhsapts.com 



Bem-Ptyiem 



NICE DUPLEX BOS Vet- 
tier, tout 'bedroom, two 
bath, all appliances, 
washer' dryer. August 1 
Si. 0807 month 785-293- 
5197 



Rent-Houses 



FOUR FIVE, tut, seven 
Hal 

hMNM 
lion next to K- Slate and 
Aggienlle MullsHe 
kitchens and bathrooms, 
washer dryer, dish- 
washer, central ait rea- 
sonable rates, no pels 
June and August leases 
TNT Rental* 786-539- 
0549 

NEW HOUSE, (out-bed- 
room, two bathroom, 
close to campus avail- 
able August 1st I AH 
Pierre 785-3O4-0M7 

NEWLV REMODELED 
three-bedroom, one Bath 
room, large garage 1401 
Yuma 785 304-0387 



Rent -Houses 



NEXT TO campus. Avail- 
able now. June end Au- 
gust One, two, three, 
lour, five, six, and nme- 
bedrooms Apartments, 
houses, and multiplexes. 
No pets 785-537-7050 

NICE BRITTNAV Ridge 
Townhome. tour-bed- 
room, two and M2 bath, 
all appliances, washer' 
dryer August I No pats 
S980' month 785-293- 
5197 

THREE, FOUR, .in.! ttva- 
Pedrooms L>idn : get the 
house you wanted last 
year 7 The good ones go 
tast Can 786-341 -0C86 



Help Wanted 



COMPUTER PROGRAM- 
MERS wanted lor posi- 
tions In the Knowledge 
Discovery in Databases 
Research group at re- 
state Applicants should 
be responsible, diligent 
and creative, ant) should 
be Ismiliat with Gf or 
Java, or have the ability lo 
learn Pay Is commensu- 
rate with experience; all 
grades are encouraged to 
apply Call 766-341-1909 
or send resume lo bhSuS- 
at Jl4U.edu. 

DAYCARE NEEDED lot 
1WO girls. 4 years and 8 
months of age Couple 
hours a Oay and some 



erences Contact Amy at 
785-410-5718 or e-mail 
me at amy-ptcsl (Soon • 
net 

DERBY DINING Center 

Openings in sanitation 
and lood production de 
partments. Starting at 
$0 75/ hour. FtoMMe 
hours Apply at Derby 129 

EARN 1800- $3200 a 
month to drive brand new 
cars wtth ads placed on 
them www AdCarClub 
com. 

FULLTIME AND part- 
time Porter needed Musi 
have valid driver's license 
and clean driving record. 
See Eddie at Schism 
Chrysler Dodge 3100 An- 
derson 

FULL-TIME CLERK posi- 
tions available Motorcy- 
cling background a plus 
Will train. Apply in person 
at Brooks Yamaha. 6070 
East Highway 24. Manhat- 
tan KS 

FULL- TIME SUMMER in- 
ternship Open to all ma- 
|ors gain career skills, re- 
sume experience, aver- 
age earns $700/ week 
For details call 785-317 
0455 

GRAPHIC DESIGN: Civic- 
Plus, a Manhattan based 
company and the leader 
m government websites, 
Is seeking ful-time and 
contract graphic design- 
ers No HTML experience 
is necessary bul must be 
proticienl in Photoshop 
An understanding of 
Flash. Adobe Illustrator, 
and Microsoft Word is 
helpful but not required 
Must be able to manage 
multiple projects simulta 
neously in a fast-paced 
environment Full-time 

beneiits include health 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 40t(kl 
matching. Email resume 
and design samples 10 
IQbedJcMcplus com 



if 
Help Wanted 



GREAT JOB lor Out- 
doors* People! Kaw Val- 
ley Greenhouses is look- 
ing lor help (his growing 
season We are interested 
in part or lull-lime sched- 
ules tor the second 
semester For more infor- 
mation contact human re- 
sources al kvgemploymen- 
1#yahoo.com or 776- 
8585 To apply in person 
go lo 360 Zeandaie Rd 
Manhattan, Monday- Fri- 
day flam- 4pm 

HEAD TENNIS COACH. 
Elsenhower Mdbaf. 

School Salary sat by 
teachers salary schedule. 
Spring season. Accepting 
resumes or letters with 
qualifications until position 
is tilled Apply lo Manhat- 
lan-Ogden USD 303. 
2031 Poynti Ave Manhat- 
tan, KS 66502 785-587- 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

HELP WANTED: KSl 
BEEF CATTLE RE- 
SEARCH CENTER 
CONTACT: Garrett at 
gparsonstSksu edu or 
785-539-4971 

HOME CHILDCAHE 

warned tor 2. 5 and 7 year 
old. Drlvable and reliable 
car needed References 
required Contact Lindsay 
at 785-317-2140 or 
Iknuree79tfigmail com tor 
more information 

HORTICULTURAL SER- 
VICES Garden Center is 
seeking reliable moti- 
vated individuals tor full- 
time and part time sea 
sonal positions in our re- 
tail store. Above average 
wages commensurate 
with experience and abili- 
ties Apply in person at 
11524 Landscape Ln Si 
George, KS 68535 785 
4942418 ot 785-776 
0397 

K STATE LIBRARIES has 
two openings tor work 
Irom 8- noon in the mail 
room at Hale Library 
Heavy lifting required To 
apply go lo www lib ksu - 
edu Affirmative Action 
Equal Opportunity E m- 
pl axes 



Need a 



mmm 



Advertise. 
It works. 



v 

Help Wanted 



LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 
and Landscape Foreman 
needed Competitive pay 
and beneiits Please con- 
tact Athens Services In- 
c of Topoka, KS 785-232- 
1558 or www athansser- 
vicas.com 



MAINTENANCE 
WORKER I (Hofficol 
lure). Starting Salary: 
$12 22' hour (full time) 
Position Purpose As 
ststs the Horticulture sec- 
tion In meeting its objec- 
tives by providing labor, 
operating machinery, and 
various divisional equip- 
ment Assists Horticultur 
ist m routine landscape 
Maintenance required lo 
provide high quality munic- 
ipal grounds, facilities, set 
vices and experiences lo 
pant patrons Experience 
Required: Knowledge ol 
types and uses of com- 
mon hand tools. Basic 
skills in irrigation, pruning, 
planting and pest control 
are valuable assets, along 
with a general understand- 
ing ol tud and landscape 
maintenance practices. 
Willingness and ability to 
perform heavy manual ta- 
bor lor extended periods 
of time, work outdoors In 
all weather, and perform 
routine repetitive tasks es- 
sential Applicants should 
possess mathematical 
skills, oral communication, 
writing, and reading skills 
lo complete basic reports, 
read plans and directions. 
and communicate with oth- 
ers Special Require- 
ments: Musi have and 
maintain valid driver's li- 
cense Closing Date: 
01. 31*08 All applicants 
se lec t ed tor employ- 
ment are subiect to post- 
offer pre-employment 
drug screening Appii 
cants should be al least 
18 years old or older for 
mo si positions, but no 
younger than 16 tot any 
position To be consid- 
ered tot an available posi- 
tion you must complete * 
City ot Manhattan applies 
tnn and return n to the at- 
tention of Human Re- 
sources by 5p m on the 
dosing date For informa- 
tion visit City Hall, It 01 
Poynti Ave , www.cl man- 
hattan ks ustobs.ssp , or 
email fobswa manhattan - 
ks us Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



I 
Help Wanted 



MAKE A DIFFERENCE! 
DO SOMETHING OIF- 
FERE NT t Camp coun- 
selors warned Friendly 
Pines Camp. Preacotl, 
AZ. is hiring for 08 sea- 
son 5/24- 7/31 30 plus ac- 
tMties. equestrian, water - 
sets 

course, 

more! Competitive salary 
Call 928-445 2128. e-mail 
into9ftwndtypinss.com or 
visit website wwwlnend- 
lypines.com tor applica- 
tion' information Have the 
summer ot a lifetime'! 

MANHATTAN COUNTRY 
Club has Bag Room' 
Range' Cart slaft open- 
ings. Must be able lo lift 
approximately thirty 

pounds overhead Apply 
in person al 1531 North 
10th Street. Lower Level 
Tuesday- Friday 8 30a m - 
- 5p.m 

MOUNTAIN DEW ropre- 
aentatlves needed Be a 
leader this spring! Get 
paid to promote a brand 
you love while gaining 
reel world experience. 
Only two positions are 
available Go to www 
repnatlon.com/dewcrew 

io apply I 



mo mm. itc 

BITE? 



Start checking 



V 

Help Wanted 



NEED SOMEONE to help 
clean my house, sixteen 
hours' week Cat Rhonda 
at 7B5 537-7978 lor Intet- 

view 

NOW HIRING Subway 
Work up to 20 hours a 
week, meals provided 
Oay. night, and weekend 
shifts needed Win work 
around schedule Pick up 
application at any Sub- 
way Including the Student 
Union. 

PART-TIME receptionist ' 
office assistant experi- 
ence with quickbooks and 
Microsoft office written 
and verbal communication 
skills Important ability to 
mufti-task and work in a 
dynamic environment 

send resume to 

I .I'l " II - ■ 'ihl'i- . >■!!' 

PART-TIME SALES Failh 
Furniture In Manhattan is 
seeking dependable 

associates lor sales ana 
othei duties Weekends 
and weekdays as avail- 
able Every lourth week- 
end oft A great part-time 
job' Apply in parson 302 
EastHwy 24 

PROGRAM ASSISTANT 
(Sunset Zoo), Starting 
Salary: 16 30.' hour (Sea- 
sonal) Position Respon- 
sibilities: To lacrtiiale a 
variety ol high qualify rev- 
enue generating, and edu- 
cational programs such as 
birthday parties, cam- 
pouts, classes, and clubs, 
as well as live animal pro- 
grams at Sunset Zoo Po- 
sition also assists with Ihe 
supervision and training 
volunteers Experience 
Required: High school 
graduate of GED re- 
quired plus background 
knowledge ot zoos, ani- 
mals, and current educa- 
tion practices vital Excel- 
lent public speaking skits 
and ability to adopt to a 
variety of audiences and 
volunteer needs required 
Must be able to work with 
little supervision Position 
schedule very versatile, 
working one to thirty 
hours per week, depend- 
ing on staff needs and per- 
sonal schedule Special 
Requirement: Must have 
and maintain a valid 
driver's license Closing 
Dele: Open until filled All 
applicants selected tor 
employment are subiecl 
to post-offer pre-employ- 
ment drug screening Ap- 
plicants should be at least 
IS years ot age ot older 
lor most positions, bul not 
younger than 16 lot any 
position To tM consid- 
ered for an available posi- 
tion, you must complete a 
City ot Manhattan applies 
Ibo and return it to Ihe at- 
tention of Human Re- 
sources by 5p.m. on Ihe 
closing date. For xiforma- 
Iton visit City Hall 1101 
Poyntz Ave, www.cl.rnan- 
hattan ks us/pbs asp . or 
e-mail fobs $ci nvanhatlan 
ks us Equal opportunity 
Employer 

PROJECT MANAGER 
CivlcPtus has on opening 
in our Manhattan head- 
quarters office lor a full- 
time Protect Manager 
This challenging position 
entails managing multiple 
website redesign protects 
trom start to finish Posi- 
tion requires attention to 
detail, the ability to man- 
age multiple tasks priori- 
ties and deadlines and a 
cheertul attitude Training 
Is provided Benefits in- 
clude Health, Dental, Paid 
Holidays Paid Vacaiion 
and 40 IK matching 
Email resume in text or 
Word formal to 
|obs9crvicptus com 



V 

Help Wanted 



SPRING/ SUMMER Sea- 
sonal Seasonal posi 
lions, non-benefit eligible 
Starting Salaries $5 85' 
hour to $24 00' game, 
pending position and quali- 
fications Positions List- 
ing: Umpires, referees, in- 
structors, and program su- 
pervisors tot various 
sports programs (base 
ball, softball. basketball, 
soccer, volleyball, etc); 
Day camp Counselors 
and Coordinators: baetlaU 
maintenance: swim 

coach, klsguard cashier, 
basket checker, and water 
aerobics Instructor tor the 
pools Special Require- 
ments: Applicants mutt 
be at least 16 years ol 
age Pnor seasonal em- 
ployees are encouraged 
to re-apply Closing Data: 
Applications will be ac- 
cepted until positions are 
tilled All applicants se- 
lected for employment 
erst tubtect to poet-offer 
pre-employment drug 
screening. Applicants 
should be al least 18 
yean ol age or older lor 
most positions, but not 
younger than 16 tor any 
position To be consid- 
ered lor en available posi- 
tion, you must complete a 
City of Manhattan appkea- 
hon and return rl to Ihe at- 
tention ol Human Re- 
sources by 5pm on the 
closing date For informa- 
tion visit Crty Holt. 1101 
Poynu Ave, www.a man- 
hettan ks usfjobs.osp . or 
e-mail tubs® ci manhotlan 
ksua Equal opportunity 
Employer 

STEEL & PIPE Supply 
Company- Inventory Ana- 
lyst Assistant There is an 
immediate opening for an 
Inventory analyst assis- 
tant at our corporate of- 
fice. Position Is responsi- 
ble tor creating migration 
materials, analyzing and 
monitoring SAP software 
processes, and assisting 
m analysts ol warehouse 
cycle counting data Also 
support lor customer ser- 
vice and sales staff Ouak 
bed candidates will have 
basic math and account, 
ing Work experience in In- 
ventory control a plus 
Two years college educa- 
tion preferred Interested 
applicants should submit 
resume to Steel S Pipe 
Supply. Inv Anafyst As- 
sist PO Box 1688. Man- 
hattan, KS 66505. Equal 
Opportunity Employer 

STEEL « PIPE SUPPLY 

COMPANY- Business 
Analyst There is an im- 
mediate opening tor a 
Business Analyst at our 
corporate office This tut- 
time position Is part of an 
IT Development team, 
whose task is to execute 
protects involving informa- 
tion technology to supply 
added business value 
The Business Analyst po- 
sition is responsible lor de- 
veloping business require- 
ments, testing solutions. 
and training users on 
those solutions Qualified 
candidates will have excel- 
lent people skills and 
musl be detail oriented 
Two- five years experi- 
ence and/ or education in 
Business ot related held 
required Knowledge ol Mi- 
crosoft Oftice applications 
required Competitive pay 
with excellent benefits In- 
terested applicants should 
e-mail resume and cover 
letter to paulmig ipsa 
com or moil to SPS. Atten- 
tion: Malt. PO Box 1588. 
Manhattan Kansas 

66505 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



Rent Advertise, 




»"T ITt I 



!!!! LEASING 111) 

Now, June or August 

Apartments, Houses, Duplexes 

1,2,3,4 bedrooms 

587-9000 

Emerald Property Management 

www.emefaldpropertvmanaqemerit.com 

J 



Management 

\rt' you confident, posi live, 
fast pact-d and enthusiastic J 

Burqw King's nl Manlutun and lunrtiun 
Ciiy *r» looking far miM otiffitr-d 
irtuividuJh to qrtiw with oik Lortiaatiy 

Kit iWdiirant narnrMt? No (Hoblem *Jf will train the no, hi 
individual from thr ground floor up 

We ulfn i mrrtpeliiiir i**r 'nd be nrfil poriuar luted on urfw 
jod lilt i-iottir-ni t Must br Mailable nigfiis and wriHtmdv Wt ait 
mill nq lo pay Ifit men! lor It* bnt 

Mr 

- 40 IK "kdvitigt plan with (Mnpaflv (cmrtibutWis 

• Liberal paid walunrxtri 

- % [lay work were 

• Monthly ( Annual bourn plan 
■ fteMafl 



v mrxt w*rrf*sxrjon unumeg tkn 
«rnbn4 iiw ntwarrMHii pttvttmm 




OnlihlUtfiiJOrr 

lurqn linn Offitr 

ffiSo.IV. 

OasM Bimii 

*fj; <1 1 MOO fit .'?<! 

kimhfyrr#*ijf uwh&iiliiiq t am 




Burger king is seeking high- 

eneffry people tu join our 

restaurant family. 

If you art working i poMfinn That can oftrr 
4 growth laddtt leading to rnanagrmmc 
and a wiirl bttwfit paikJO/. plrM torn* 
rrnipletf an apphtitinn Wr arc taking 
appliiiliom for all Unfa 



HeOJhi 

-( nmpnitiit starting wagn 

-Paul v« audi program tor all stall member) 

• I'] pnte on. oil duty nwalt 

*f tnr uniforms 

-frequent prrtnrmanre'ulary evaluations 

•llniblt uheduling 

•Tuition itrnttxifMiTitnt program 

•Retirement program: 

-Savinas bond put fuse program 

Mmm apply m Mawhettaa at 
1i28Uiafliwa< JOCUanderwi 



ea 



^C*"UCslV eveOt'*t V€&&& 



785.776.3804 • www.mdiproperties.com 



* 



Sl$> 



£™J 



Go Direct. Go GTM" 



Graphic Designer 



Graduating in May m Graphic Design? Start part-time this spring and 
become full lime upon graduation. GTM Sportswear ts looking for a 
creative person to join our marketing team Responsibilities include 
layout ot' direct mail material, catalogs, livers, ads and other 
promotional materials. Experience in InDesign, Photoshop, and 
Ulustraloi preferred. Phoiography experience is a plus. Benefit 
package includes health, denial, vision. 401k, profit sharing, paid 
holiday, and paid time off Please send your resume and salary 
requirements In: GTM Sportswear, 520 McCall Rd. Manhattan. KS 
66502 ot e mail humanresources#igtm.com. 
If you have a portfolio onloine or on CD, please provide this as well. 



I 



Help Wanted 



STUDENT PUBLICA- 
TIONS Inc baa a part- 
time position lor a Macm- 
losfi teefinician available . 
The tech support team 
maintains about SO Macm- 
losh workstations, provid- 
ing software support as 
well ss performing gen- 
eral hardware mainte- 
nance Any experience 
wftfi Mae OSX. design 
software such as Adobe 
Photoshop. Adobe InOe- 
sign. and networking la 
helpful but not required 
Pay starts st M 50 per 
hour with the opportunity 
to advance Must be a fue- 
tima student el KSU. Ap- 
plications may be picked 
up in 113 Kedile or online 
at http'nwww kstaleooee- 
gion convapubJ Down- 
toad the second applica- 
tion at this link Applica- 
tion deadline is 5 p.m Fn- 
day. February 15. 2008 
Please include your 
spring 2008 daaa sched- 
ule. 

STUDENT TECHNICIAN 
position opening $7.00/ 
hour Hours required: 20 
hours/ weak when das* le 
in session, 40 hours/ 
week during summer and 
breaks Job description 
Pickup and delivery of 
computers, printers, etc 
to venous campus loca- 
tions |vakd drivers kcenae 
required), general PC and 
pnnler maintenance and 
repair general Inventory 
and accounting lunctiona. 
Pre lerred quaktlcaltons: 
1st or 2nd year student in 
computer, electronics. Of 
related mayor, applicants 
with demonstrated me- 
chanical aptitude com- 
puter maintenance experi- 
ence) helpful How to ap- 
ply Interested applicants 
should come in person to 
121 East Stadium lo fill 
out an application Please 
contact Anthony Phillips 
at Anthony® ksu edu wrth 
any questions about the 
position 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT 
position available lor re- 
state undergraduate stu- 
dent with a variety of 
skills. Must have good in- 
terpersonal and problem 
solving skills Experience 
with PC's and popular soil- 
ware applications such as 
Word Perfect MS Word, 
MS Excel MS Internet Ex- 
plorer, Internet applica- 
tions, basic web page edit 
ing and Windows applica- 
tions dewted Mult have a 
technical understanding ol 
Microsoft Windows Sum- 
mer availability neces- 
sary Computer Network 
experience preferred Ap- 
plications must be submit- 
ted al Department of Com- 
muracanons IET, 2tt Um- 
bergar Hall. 78a-532- 
6270 Applications wot be 
available' accepted until 
January 25. 2008 Please 
attach resume with Ihe ap- 
plicalion 

sv 1 1. DC ATS NEED-JOBS - 
COM PAID survey lakers 
needed in Manhattan 
1 0OS tree lo |oin Click on 
surveys 



Help Wanted 



WORK AT home, book 
keeping and sales repre- 
sentative You can work 
at home and ei>m up tn 
$3000- $4000 monthly 
Contact it interested E 
mail tgbociarognopl net 

WORKING MOM needs 
babysitter for 11 year old 
three nights a week indud 
tog soma weekend 
s Hours 5 30pm to 7- 
00am WIH pay $30.00 a 
mght Easy part-time |ob 
Col Kalhy St 785-637- 
8558 or 785*10 7533 

ZOO CREW Supervisor 
Sunset Zno Starting 
Salary: $5 85, hour (pan 
time, non-benefit eligible | 
Experience Required: 
Diploma or OED required, 
plus excellent supervisory 
skins, espenence working 
with teens and animal 
knowledge vital Musi 
momlatn a valid driver's k 
cense and be able to work 
Mondays (no more than 
lour hours) Incumbent 
will supervise and edu 
cate several teen volun- 
teers working with basic 
animal husbandry Clos- 
ing Dole: Open unlit filled 
All applicants selected 
lor employment are sub- 
led to poet-otter pre-em- 
ployment drug screen 
Ing. Applicants shoulo be 
at least 1 8 years ol age or 
coder lor most positions, 
but not younger than 16 
(or any position To be 
considered lor an avail 
obi* position, you musl 
complete a City ot Manhat- 
tan application and reium 
it to the attention ot Hu 
man Resources by 5pm 
on the dosing date For in 
lormetion visit Crty Hal. 
1101 PoynLr Ave. wwwci - 
manhattan ks us/)obs - 
asp, or e-mail xjbsttct - 
manhattan. ks.us or Equal 
opportunity Employer 





JIMMY JOHN'S 

Gourmet Sub Sandwich Shop 

Now hiring crew members and 
drivers. Flexible scheduling, 
free/discounted meals 
great pay, and a fun 
work environment. 
Apply in person 
today at 1212 Moro 




Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



suldolku 



nil in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 



5 9 




3 1 


1 


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8 


4 3 


5 


7 9 


6 


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1 


9 


1 


2 


4 


2 6 


7 


7 8 


5 


2 1 


5 


9 8 


4 
8 5 


3 6 




Solution and tips 


at w 


ww.sudoku 


.com 



"Knit I luff, lu.tl I },•!/>, fiat! Of, 

I rtr |H i uii.iiu i ta>-stilli> 

lui.illi uinrnlLiiii.il sen in' 
Sunn- rfc) rtMilK • ( ill lor ii|i|Miiiiliti( nt 
I* ist A I Viluuji 

Mmi -In 'I ,i iti -S |> in 



GflOWtNG COMPANY 
SeWKing mo.ivL.lad K 
Slater a who wish lo earn 
money fast working pan 
urn© online from home 
www.tavldanca.abunza • 
com. 



Open M,u Ki't 



Garage yard Sales 



MULTI-FAMILY SALE 

Manhattan Junior crew 
rowing club Microwave 
vacuum, furniture . cloth- 
ing, bikes, elc Saturday. 
January 28, Sam- 12p.m. 
I Bag sale- 10:30a. ml 
3015 Anderson, (next to 
Rays Apple Market, Plua 
West Shopping Center) 



Deadlines 



Clam fied ads muit be 
placed by n on n the day 
before you want yom -mi 
to tun Claw ti i-d display 

arJi nnjji be placed by 
ap.m two win king days 

prior lo the date you 

want your ad to run 

CALL 785 532 6555 



Classified Raf«M 



tDAV 

20 words or last 

S1J7S 

tech word Over 20 

IO* per word 

1 DAYS 

JOwoirts Of lew 

|14M 

each word over 20 

251 per word 

3 DAYS 

20 wordt oi Irw 

117 a<> 

each wovd over 20 

10( per word 

A DAYS 

20 wordi or less 

tts 

each word ovei 20 

3S( per word 

5 D'V/S 

20 woidi Ot Ion 

120 50 

each word over 20 

40f per word 

(conieiiitive day rate) 



To Place An Ad 



GotoKedrj" lu» 
(across from the K-Stat* 

Student U< 

Office hours are Monday 

through Friday from 

8 * m. to S p in 

or plain an ad online at 

www * st at ec ollegi an » ortV 

and chek the yellow 

Submit CI a »<fied link 



How To Pay 



All classifieds must be 
paid in advanre unlvsi 
you have an account 

with Student 
Publications Int Cash, 
check, MasterCard ur 

Visa are accepted. 
There is a 125 service 
charge on all returned 
checks We reserve the 
ught to edit. r*|#cl or 
properly classify any ad. 



Free Found Ads 



As a service to you. we 

run found ads for three 

days In?* of tlia'ge 



Corrections 



If you find an error in 
your sd. pleas* cell us. 
We arci'pt tevponsibiliif 
only tor thr fust wrong 

Inui/t'un 



Cancellations 



If you sell your item 
before youi ad has 

expired, we will refund 

you tor the remaining 

days You must 
before noon the day 

before the ad is to be 
published 



Headlines 



For *n extra charge, 

wtVM put a headline 

above your »ii to catch 

the reader \ attention 



Categories 



JTiTi 



Kulk-ttri BtMrt! 




Hi hi '.it it; Real Estate 




L mploy merit Catwn 




Open Mat* el 




I 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 10 




Ringing 
in the 



new year 




New technology improving, making way to market in 2008 



By Brandon McAtee 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Every year brings new and exciting gadgets especially in this rap- 
idly growing technological world This year is no different, especially 
with items geared toward college students. 

Many students can be seen around campus plugged in to their 
MP3 players, and two companies making the biggest splashes with 

these players tire Apple, with their new 
iPods, and Microsoft, with the Zune. 

Joe Geske, senior customer assis- 
tant at Best Buy and sophomore in fine 
arts, said the iPod and Zune make up 
more than 50 percent of the market 
Both are priced the same and start at 
a four-gigabyte size, which can hold 
about 1.000 songs. Many of them have 
video-playing capabilities and can hold 
up to 80 gigabytes of space. 

The two companies use similar soft 
ware to purchase and place content on 
the players with Apple's iTunes and Mi- 
crosoft's Zune Marketplace The com- 
panies now offer a new service through 
their softwares that allow users to con- 
nect their device to a computer and rent 
movies online 

The differences between these MP3 
players standout mostly with the Zune 
It has a built-in FM radio and connects 
wirelessly to add songs, while the iPod of- 
fers a touch screen interface An accessory to look out for with the 
iPod is the new stereo that can serve as a dock, which has wireless 
speakers with a battery life of five hours 

"You can literally take the speakers with you to the floor below 
you in the dorms, and they still work," Geske 

Geske also said mure people arc buying the iPod, but (or a week 
in December the Zune was outselling the iPod, marking the first time 
since the Zune's release 

Laptops remain convenient for students, and Lee Overley, gener- 
al manager of Staples, said there are two laptops that fit a typical col 
lege student's life 

The 2737 US Pavillion, which has the fastest AMD processor 
available, will connect to all types of wireless connections. It also in 
eludes a CD/DVD burner, three gigabytes of RAM, a 250-gigabyte 
hard drive, and a built in Web cam 




"It has become very pop- 
ular with soldiers so they 
have one less item to take 
with them," Overley said of 
the Pavillion. 

Another laptop is the 
HDX 9010 from Hewl- 
ett Packard This laptop 
might not be very transfer- 
rable, as it is 15.5 pounds, 
but it will save space 
in any apartment 
or dorm room, 
ft has a 20- 
inch screen that 
is movable or 
lockable, and has 
a HD tuner and HDM1 capability. Users can record on it, similar to 
a DVR or watch a Blue Ray movie. The system has two separate 120- 
gigabyte hard drives, so users can save music or other media on one. 
and work on the other, to keep it from slowing down 

"This laptop could be your television, radio, music player and 
movie player in one," Overley said 

He also pointed out DLP projectors as a hot new item, which dis- 
play High Definition television on the wall, making a very large view- 
ing area. 

Another hot-selling item lately are global positioning systems for 
cars, which give directions, among other information Overley said 
they were their best selling items during Christmas, despite the high 
prices. New features on these items include text to-speech - which 
will tell drivers the street name to turn on - and a touch screen that 
a driver or passenger can scroll through the map with their finger. 





ASK THE FIFTH YEAH 



Ask a fifth year answers questions about resolutions 



1. Stop stealing from my 
friends. 

Dustin, Nick. 
- I have a 
phone char- 
ger that be 
longs to one 
of you. I just 
don't know 
whom. I just 
have this at 
traction to 
ward shiny 
things * DAM 

REICHENBERGEft 




2. Go to 

the rec 

BuU IV Gutz, Pilates, 
maybe even Spintacular if I'm 
feeling extra adventurous I 
just have to know what all the 
fuss is about. So ladies, if you 
see a hairy, sweaty guy in one 
of your classes, just know he's 
not there to "pick you up" I 
wasn't blessed with that talent 



No. I'm just there to learn 

3. Stop answering my sis- 
ter's phone calls. 

I got this call the other 

day. 

"Adam, guess what?" 
"You're pregnant ... ?" 
"No, 1 was watching this 

fashion show, and they said 

hairy chests are in!" 

4. Fix the sink. 

My friend Tony said to me 
the other day, "Adam, some- 
limes they don't need you to 
fix the faucet," referring to 
women, they just want you to 
listen to the leak" Philosoph- 
ical genius. Except that 1 tru- 
ly do need to fix this beautiful 
girl's sink. I was working on it 
the other day, and the hot wa- 
ter shot straight up through the 
cabinet above I get my hands 
over it and water's still spray- 



ing everywhere, babies are cry 
ing, dogs are barking, a win 
dow shatters, in the distance 
I hear a train whistle and an 
old lady cry out in terror, "Ha- 
lal! Halal!" (Yes, my fictitious 
old women scream like Bugs 
Runny l And she just sits there 
smiling pretty, looking at me 
like the idiot I am. So I figure I 
should take care of that. 

5. Reverse engineer the 
I hi milium' Any Time Fire Log 
io cure world -hunger. 

If Jesus were to endorse a 
fire log, this would be the one. 
I'm not kidding. This thing's 
amazing And apparently, now 
they have this Dura/lame Ul- 
tra 1 get chills just thinking 
about it. I can't wait 

6. Get "American Gladia- 
tors" canceled. 

Don't get me wrong - 



I love that they brought the 
show back. I don't see why 
they got rid of it in the first 
place There's no way it was 
losing money. But after watch- 
ing the first few episodes, 1 
can't help but feel disappoint- 
ed. I'm still going to watch it, 
of course, but why not bring 
back the classics? I'm just say- 
ing, Nitro and Gemini would 
make Titan and Mayhem look 
like gentle bunnies 

7 Stop referring to wom- 
en as "broads." 

8. Take advantage of the 
Student Union's Ride Board. 

Rider Wanted Where: 
anywhere When: anytime 
Conditions: rub my upper thigh 
the whole trip You would fig 
ure after five years of post- 
ing that someone would have 
called. That's a free ride, peo- 



ple. And let's be honest, its just 
a thigh 

9 Figure out how I'm still 
alive. 

It baffles me. 

10. Find a mother for my 

unborn British baby. 

It's not like I've got any- 
thing better to do 

U. Stop being so judg- 
mental. 

I might tell you, "Nice 
boots," but internally I'm laugh- 
ing ... hard. 

12. Find my acorns. 



Wan ReJdwflbenjer ii a fifth-year 

t m Monorrots *nd m*rh*mit(a, 
t tend comment! to idftwtpub. 



NIWMOVIIIIILIASIl 




'RAMBO'(R) 

)ohn Rambo has retreated to 
northern Thailand, living a 
solitary and peaceful life in 
the mountains and jungles. 
A group of human rights mis- 
sionaries search him out and 
ask him to guide them into 
Burma to deliver medical 
supplies When the aid work- 
ers are captured by the Bur- 
mese army. Rambo decides 
to venture alone into the wax 
zone to rescue them, 

"UNTRACEABLE" (R> 
Within the FBI, there exists a 
division dedicated to investi- 
gating and prosecuting crim- 
inals on the Internet. Wel- 
come to the front lines of the 
war on cybercrime, where 
Special Agent Jennifer Marsh 
has seen it ail - until now. 
A tech-sawy Internet pred- 
ator is displaying his graph- 
ic murders on his own Web 
site - and the fate of each of 
his tormented captives is left 
in the hands on the public: 
the more hits his site gets, the 
faster his victims die Whet] 
this game of cat and mouse 
becomes personal. Marsh and 
her team must race against 
the clock to track down this 
technical mastermind who is 
virtually untraceable. 



4 1 1 Mill 

2clttys 



"4 MONTHS 3 WEEKS AND 
2DAYS"(NR) 

Romania, during the final 
days of Communism. OtiliS 
and Gabita are students; they 
share a room in a residence 
hall in Bucharest Gabita is 
pregnant. The girls arrange to 
meet a certain Mr Bebe in a 
cheap hotel He will perform 
Gabita's illegal abortion. But 
Mr Bebe refuses their mon- 
ey and demands to be paid in 
kind. 

"MEET THE SPARTANS" 

(PG-13) 

The warriors of "500" might 
have been able to hold their 
own - at least lor a while 
- against an army of thou- 
sands, but can they defend 
themselves against this sat 
ire^ From the minds b& 
hind "Epic Movie," "Meet 
the Spartans" tackles every- 
thing from the action movie 
to "You got Served" to Brir- 
ncy Spears. 




"THE AIR I BREATHE" (R) " 
A businessman bets his life 
on a horse race, a gangster 
sees the future, a pop star 
falls prey to a crime boss, and 
a doctor must save the love of 
his life. Based on an ancient 
Chinese proverb, these fouj 
overlapping stories drama- 
tize the four emotional cor- 
nerstones of life: happiness, 
pleasure, sorrow and love. 

- yahoomovies.com 



, 



y^> KANSAS STATE 

Collegian 






* w w.kst jtM oilw) ian com 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 



Vol.113 | No M 



New text messaging system alerts students of local emergencies 




By Sheila Ellis 

KANSAS STATt COLLKjIAN 

Jessica Heath, junior in 
family studies and human ser- 
vices, said texl messages are one 
of the best ways lo contact stu- 
dents. 

"Most people have their 
phone on them all the time 
and it is easier to access than 
a computer might be," Heath 
said "People are more likely to 
check their phones than their e- 
mail," she said 

Now students, faculty and 
staff can be notified almost si- 
multaneously via text message 
the next time an emergency 
takes place The optional ser- 
vice became available on Ian 
18. 



Rob Caffey, director of K- 
State's office of mediated educa- 
tion and leader of the task force 
for the text-messaging system, 
said the system allows qualified 
users to register their cell phone 
numbers on die university's ex 
isting eProfile information sys 
tern. The text messages will be 
sent by Leader Alert, a rapid 
notification platform 

Caffey said it is crucial for 
students and faculty to sign up 
for the messages 

"We've done a lot of work 
to gel the system in place," he 
said "It is important people 
sign up because it is a voluntary 
system." 

Caffey said the way the 
system works is when peo- 
pie sign up on hltps//eid,k- 



siateedu their phone numbers 
will be sent to a database with 
Leader Alert After users regis 
ter he said users will receive a 
text message to confirm the ser- 
vice Then, if an emergency sit- 
uation comes up, the police de- 
partment or the university can 
evoke the system to send out a 
message automatically that will 
go to ail the numbers in the da- 
tabase. He said it could take up 
to 30 minutes for the system to 
deliver all the messages 

Leader Alert handles a lot 
of university systems and the 
system can handle the entire 
number of students, faculty and 
staff at K-State, Caffey said 

"We hope people will opt 
in to this and we hope it is a 
valuable resource." he said. 



There will be a lest once a 
semester lo make sure the sys- 
tem is working correctly, Caffey 
said The first test will be Feb. 
1. 

Thomas Kawson, vice pres- 
ident for Administration and 
Finance at K State, said after 
the Virginia Tech shooting last 
spring, K- Stale began to eval- 
uate its emergency notifica- 
tion systems. He said last (all 
the university developed a task 
force to look into the option of 
such a notification system 

"We talked lo other univer- 
sities in Kansas and found out 
they were all in various stages.' ' 
Kawson said. 

Though Ihc text- 

SwTHTP*jM) 



A question of content 




Hy-Vee proposes bill to increase 
alcohol level in legal sales 



By Amanda Keirrt 

KANSAS SI A tt COUK IAN 

A bill requesting that 
grocery stores be allowed to 
sell wines, spirits and mul- 
titudes of other alcohol- 
ic items is working its way 
through the Kansas legisla- 
ture right now 

The bill, proposed by 
Hy-Vee, would eliminate 
the current Kansas law that 
prohibits grocery stores 
from selling anything with 
greater than 3 2 percent al 
cohol content 

City Commissioner 
Bob Straw n said thai re- 
moval of this law would al- 
ter the face of Kansas as a 
state 

"Kansas is a pretty con- 
servative state It wasn't 
long ago that you couldn't 
even drink in Kansas at 
all." said Strawn "We are 
not moving as fast as other 
slates around the country in 
terms of liquor sales It's a 
reflection of who we are as 
Kansans" 

This conservative "re- 
flection" stands firm today 
as parts of Kansas do not 
sell liquor at all. and most 
do not allow liquor sales 
on Sundays. Nol long ago. 
Kansas would not allow li- 
quor at all and even passing 
planes would have lo cease 
liquor sales over the slate. 
Slrawn said 

In other states, such as 
Missouri, Hy-Vee and oth- 
er grocery chains arc able 
to sell liquor products al 



will, according to the Hy- 
Vee Web site Missouri has 
no percent age -based liquor 
differentiation system. 

"There is an open space 
today, that if the legislation 
is approved, they (Hy-Vee] 
will build a liquor store 
(here as an extension of the 
grocery store." Strawn said 

Though it is obvi- 
ous that Hy-Vee will make 
use of this legislation, oth- 
er large grocery chains in 
Manhattan must rely on 
corporate office decisions. 

Though Walgreen s sells' 
liquor products in other 
parts of the country, it does 
not in Kansas and would 
continue to avoid selling 
liquor if the law were to 
change 

"I'm sure it's a cor 
porale decision that they 
made," Cassidi O'Shea. 
Walgrecns store manag- 
er, said. "We are a pharma 
cy, and we want to promote 
hcalh It's even hard lo pro- 
mote tobacco products, be- 
cause we want to promote 
healthy living There's prob- 
ably tax issues. I'm sure 
there's a whole list of rea- 
sons why we wouldn't." 

Though the law would 
prove beneficial to consum- 
ers who would only need to 
make one stop al the gio- 
cery store lo purchase both 
food and liquor, the bill 
would crush Kansas liquor 
stores, Strawn said 

|eff Filby. owner ol Filby 
Liquor Store, said that this 
is not the first lime his bus i- 



Photo iHurtrtfion by MaU Ctstro | ■ nil H.IAN 



ness has been threatened by 
large grocery chains. 

"There is an associa- 
tion that a lot of us [inde- 
pendent liquor stores) be- 
long to that has been fight- 
ing this for years, and I as- 
sume we'll be righting it 
again," Filby said. "This isn't 
a new thing; it's been going 
on for years'' 

Filby compared the 
ability of chain stores to 
sell liquor to that of large 
grocery chains ruining the 
market for smaller, local 
grocery retailer? 

"I'm dead set against it 
There is no way that we | in- 
dependent retailers) could 
compete with Hy-Vec and 
I lie other major chains with 
their purchasing power," 
Filby said 

"If the HyVees and 
Wa I -Marts and all them 
start selling wine and spir- 
its and the strong beer, then 
the small liquor stores are 
out of business." 

Strong resistance from 
independent liquor stores 
and conservatives has 
Strawn believing that this 
bill will not pass into Kan- 
sas law anytime soon 

"My guess is that it is 
unlikely that it will pass. It 
will have fierce resistance 
from the conservative leg 
islature, and there will be 
fierce resistance from the 
existing liquor industry," 
Strawn said "I would be 
surprised if we have liquor 
in grocery stores in the fore- 
seeable future " 

Additional photos on Page 1 1 



Local man injured outside 
Rusty's during alleged crime 



BySaltnaStratr 

KANSAS STATE t OLLfcOIAN 

A Manhattan man was in- 
jured during an alleged aggra- 
vated burglary and battery out- 
side Rusty's I^ast Chance Bar 
and Grill on Wednesday, ac- 
cording lo a Riley County Po- 
lice report 

RCPD Lt Kurt Moldrup 
said the 21 -year-old man was 
having a drink on the patio of 
Rusty's (1211 Moro Si i when 
he exited the establishment, Af- 
ter leaving, three men allegedly 
asked him for money around 2 
a.m. As he declined, one of the 
suspects hit the man and look 
his possessions The suspects 
fled the scene. According to the 
police report, taken from the 
man was a black Boost mobile 



cell phone and $18. 

Moldrup said the first sus- 
pect was described as a while 
man about 6 feet 2 inches tall 
and between the ages of 22 and 
28. The suspect had a platinum 
grill on the top row of his teeth 
and was last seen wearing a 
black or navy do-rag and a red 
ball cap 

The second suspect was 
described as a black man about 
6 feet 3 inches tall and between 
the ages of 25 and 33. The sus 
peel was last seen wearing a 
black coat with a white liner. 

The third suspect was de- 
scribed as a black man about 6 
feet 1 inch tall. 

The man was taken to 
Mercy Regional Health Center 
for pain, according to RCPD re- 
ports 



Union Expo informs, entertains students 




LHIt Ald*rtcm | dill KUAN 
Hal lay Gillespie graduate student in drama therapy, and Owen, a 
poppet hippopotamus, perform for passers-by for the Creative Arts 
Therapy Students organisation at Thursday's activity fair. 



By Jasmine C. Hammond 

kahsas runeouMUM 

Now that he has one se- 
mester n f c ol lege and a m on I h 
of winter break, Aaron Lam- 
bert said he can't wait to get 
more involved in on-campus 
activities 

Lambert, freshman in 
pre-nted and business admin- 
istration, attended the Wild- 
cat Winter Expo in the K- 
Stale Student Union court- 
yard Thursday night from I 
to 8 The event was hosted 
by the Union Program Coun- 
cil 

More than 140 student 
organizations set up display 
boards and activities in the 
K Slate Student Union to 
promote the purpose of their 
organ i rations and let stu- 
dents know how they can gel 



involved. 

Lambert said some of 
the tables he stopped at were 
em Power eats. Native Amer- 
ican Student Association, 
Black Student Union, Alpha 
Phi Alpha. Delta Lambda 
Phi and a new organization 
on campus called The Stu- 
dent Farm Club. 

"I want to gel a wide 
range of friends from differ- 
ent walks of life," Lambert 
said. 

Susan Malzkc, adminis- 
trative assistant for Student 
Activities and Services, said 
it was a beneficial event for 
students. 

Georgia Campbell, ju- 
nior in family studies and hu- 
man services and eo chair of 
the Community Committee 

W CAHNIVM Page u 




mmmmmmm 



MM 



41 



■ ■ at! 



PAGE 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25. 2008 



ffiafiin Rooki and £opimi 



1814ClaflmRd 
wwwclallmboQks.com 



Ji 



Fat 



(785) 776-3771 
(785} 776-1009 



PUZZLES I EUGENE SHEFFER 



ACROSS 

1 Suitable 
4 Urmp 
tar 

Wars" 

crime 

lord 

IS Brock of 
baseball 
tore 

13 Guitar's 
cousin 

14 For all lo 
hear 

15 Under 
the 
weather 

16 1960s 
Brilisn 
hoodlums 

18 relief 

19 Store sign 
stal 

20 Mesopo- 
tamia, 
today 

22 Wire 
service 
initials 

23 Stir Iry 
equipment 

27 Pretense 
29 Pluto, 
once 
31 Snap 

34 La 
menters 
verse 

35 Conhne 
with walls 

37 Dine on 



38 Bleak Mm 
genre 

39 "Smoking 
oi r 

41 Metal 

( nttee cup 

holder 
45 Dfum type 

47 SoMfy 

48 Elvis 
No 1 hit, 
for short 

52 Dined 

53 Otse of 
Quiii.hili s 
offerings'? 

54 Time 
ol your 
Me" 

55 Rage 
58 Tubular 

pasta 
57" 

Mtser- 

•blM' 
58 Part ol 

NIMBY 



DOWN 

1 Out of 

sorts' 7 ' 
J On top ol 

the world? 

3 Oklahoma 
city 

4 The 
Sultan Ol 
Swat" 

5 Slrelch 

G Sick ana 
tired 

7 Toronto 
Biue- 

8 Phestty 
garment 

9 Greet 
the 
villain 

10 Purchase 

11 ft. (boards 
17 Faucet 

problem 
21 Persian 
Gulf 
nation 



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Yesterday * answer 125 



23 "Take Me 
Outlo 
the Ball 

Otm h 

one 

24 indivisible 

25 Frat party 
need 

26 Pigs 
home 

28 Opposed 

30 Meadow 

31 See 

26- Down 

32 Med 
arrange 

nurd 

33 Sapporo 
sash 

36 Remole 
control 
precursor 

37 Mesh, as 
gears 

40 Ryan or 
Srviquille 

42 One more 
1 in I 

43 Back in 
style 

44 Aimada 

45 Dal, i u'ni 

46 Mined 
finds 

48 Recipe 
meas. 

49 Lame flam 

50 Lair 

51 Rose- 
anna's TV 
hubby 



BEST BETS 

Your social calendar for the weekend 



ON THE BIG SCREEN 



RAMB0 



UNTRACEABLE 



ACROSS THE UNIVERSE 



Friday: Mi .10-00 
Saturday: tOO 115 V» 
1 45 io-oo 
Sunday: 
7 45, 1000 




the rw>' i 

Rjmbo iff nut'' 

qioupotChmlijnmiv 

sinrunes to protect them 

against pirate), during a 

hununiMiun did dsliwt to 

I tie pe ivecuted larwi people ot nuima 

ftftet ww ot the missioiunei are taken prisoner Rambo 

gets a second imoosttbtf |ofc in assemble mercenaries lo 

rescue the Hitmvmc) relief worten. 




Friday 4 10 700 
940 

Saturday 1:1 S 4 to. 
7 00 » 40 

Sunday I 15.4 W. 
'Hfi 

A secret irrvw agent, 

Imrefer Marvti played 

by Best fcttess Oscar 

nonmeehanelane 

who gets taught m a 

wry personal and deadly cat-and-mouse game with a serial 

kiMei wtKi knows that people :bemg what Itiey are - -both 

canons and drawn to the dart side of things' w* log onto an 

■urfttaceat*"Websm> 



Friday HOD 
Saturday ? 00. 9 45 
Sunday 800 



A dock t»rt» Iwfe traseh to Amenca 
inlhetgwstohndtirsfttianged 
father Ihete tie talk «i love with 
jtftleteel imeman teeruger Ucy 
When her orathtr Mai ii dratted 
tohglitmtrieVietivaniWartriey 
become iiwtfved « pe*e artwtim 

for a (foliar on fwtay and two on 
Saturday and Sunday, it i a good deal 
lodietk oul this mow 




SPORTS 



RODEO 



Men's basketball 
K State vs. ISU 

S p.m, Saturday 
Bumlagp Coliseum 



Women's basketball 

K State vs. Oklahoma State 

1: JO p.m Saturday 
Stillwatet Oklahoma 
FSJiHMwcst 



5th annual Brett Cushenbery 
memorial bullriding 

30 bull iiders, Iteestyte bullfights and 4 
brand new event bu lipoid ire some of the 
highlights during the weekend rodeo. 
Admission ts S5 with K State ID. 







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THE BLOTTER 

ARRESTS IN RILEY COUNTY 



125 



( mnooi ir 



, petty from 
the fiiley County Police [)*pa'tm#n( s 
dally logs the Collegian does n 

■ 

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 23 

John Scott Appalhim. M I '• Bobin 

Lai\e. It 4t40p.m, lor endangering a 

child icdttcu driving |l 

the influence Bond */n > 

Carrie Mirie U«ldonado, 1415 C'< • 

Idis i^ne di 6 J6 p.m for poisesiion ot 

a com f i.i I led substance or narcotic I 

potsfksicm of an opiate or naicotic Bond 

was SLOW 

David Maldonado. Jr.. Ul ' Mow » . at 

I M possesunii ol a controlled 
substance ot ntftottc and possession ot 



an opiate or narcotic Bond was S 1 S0O 
Ciyital Dawn McPheron, Ogden Kan 
ai ?i6 p.m. for possession ol a con- 
trolled substance ot narcotic, possession 
of an opiate or narcotic and unlawful 
possession ot a depressant or narcotic 
Bond was S: 

Zachary Lee Waldron, 831 lararnie St 
at 10 35 p rn for failure to appear Bond 
was $4SS 



THURSDAY, JAN. 24 

Charlie Ramos, fort Riley at 1^0 a m 
for driving unde* the MHatnci Bond 
wasS ' 

Elijah Terrell Young, IM3 A. ■■' 
Ate at 2 SB a m tor drivinq under the 
e. Bond was 



t s i cts< f iu i i k h rsy ts 

R K Y R 1 F Y R /. \ 1) \ I I 

X DOTPTU 71 VI HI) S NTXDX 

II I J£TZOT JRK J I-. I / n II K II I 

Yi-.u-r.l;n\t ispim.|ui|i:ll >s H SI UK c III \\ l\t ', 
i II M INSIIJI \ IIRI \K\1. I Kl t kt»\ 1lH \M»I 1 l> 

GET A IU HHl I h\kkllKDsnuit,i \ 

lnd.n \ i vptmimp t int. i 



CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS 



i Kennedy at " 
otto, 



SATURDAY'S WEATHER 
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THE PLANNER 

CAMPUS BULLETIN BOARD 



Applications tot Student Alumni 
Board ire available 

Center or online jt tv.m » itote. 
com ifudtnn iTudtn tutu" it nboat} 
atpi. An information reception will 
be at the Alumni Center at 4: JO 
p.m Feb. 5 for anyone interested 
in learning more about tin 
Application) are due at the Alumni 
Centet by 5 p.m Feb. 7. 

The 5th' annual Brett Cushenbery 
Memorial Bullriding v. 

."' p rn Sat ut day In Webpi Arena 
Ad 11 >i won for adults is S 10. SS with 
i >qed6 
to 12. and free foi children , 
than 6 yean okt. 

The KSHSAA baseball rules meet 
Ing will Lie at ' 



tin HighSrho-'' 
Campus Tlie meeting is lot anyone 
<Tipi ring high tctwol 

ill Anyone wil:i 
car 1 1 all Br, id Hall at 785-535 08 U). 

The Biley County Crimestoppen 

organisation wll hawt it , annual 
VVintei Benefit Softball tournament 

Softball Cofntjlut. Mens .in, I 
: 

■ ti 18 



To place an t 

Bulletin stop by KetUie I tfiand tilt 

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two days befori ; 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The Collegtan a student newvpaper at 

lished by Student Pub. I ,ve>>ijiayicluiiiig the 

sthPOlyea- tdiCil potttyV 

IS paid at Manhar- ■ 'MAStER S*l 

Nation desk at KecUie 103, Manhartar • 

idditionat copies 1 



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A 



two 
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$Y STAN WtLS€>M 

Now at Hastings 
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l» Stan crazy, or is he a genius? 

(Or is he both?) 

Read these books and 

find out for yourself! 




FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 3 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



Student Senate approves slight 
increase in student privilege fee 



Kansas court upholds murder conviction 
against former K-State English professor 



By Saiha Harden 

KANSAS STATE COLLEtilAN 

Student Senate approved 
an increase in the Student 
Activity fee and the Office of 
Student Activities and Servic- 
es Privilege Fee in last night's 
meeting. The vote to increase 
student fees passed with a 
53-0-0 vote. 

The student activity fee 
increase will be less than $1 
per student 

Included in the list u( 
passed bills was an increase 
in funds for Mortar Board 
Senior Honor Society, Black 
Student Union and Sensi- 
ble Nutrition and Body Im- 
age Peer Educators (SNAC), 



which passed 49-0-0 

SNAC was looking for 
funds to bring in an educa- 
tional speaker to address 
body image on campus. 

"With a speaker like this, 
it's very instrumental that 
we have support," said Dian 
na Schalles, Health Educator 
and registered nutritionist at 
Lafene Student Health Cen- 
ter. 

The SGA agenda also in- 
cluded the introduction of 
two resolutions. 

The first resolution was 
in support of a campus com- 
mitment to environmental 
sustainability. Several cam- 
pus organizations attended 
the meeting in support of the 



resolution's passage K-State 
received the third lowest 
score in the Big 12 confer 
ence for environmental sus- 
tainability, according to the 
resolution. 

Members also voted on a 
second resolution to support 
the K-State PROUD Cam- 
paign 

The KSU Horse judging 
Team and the K-State Crops 
Team each received commen- 
dations from the Student Sen- 
ate for their achievements 

Tin' meeting adjourned 
with a comment about the 
new K-State PROUD shirts 
from Gayle Spencer, Assis- 
tant Dean of Student Life Co- 
ordinator, 



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By Anrwtt* L*wk>« 
KANSAS STATE COLLHilAN 

TOPEKA - The Kansas 
Supreme Court has upheld the 
murder conviction of former re- 
state professor Thomas E. Mur- 
ray 

Murray. 51, was convict- 
ed of first degree murder in the 
2003 death of his former wife, 
Carmin Ross, also a former K 
State employee 

Though a Douglas Coun 
ty District Court jury found him 
guilty in March 2005, Murray 
has maintained he was inno- 
cent. 

The slate's case was consid- 
ered circumstantial, but the dis- 
trict court noted in its ruling last 
Friday that it was not the court's 
place to reassess the credibility 
of the evidence presented in the 
trial, said Run Keelover, Kansas 
Supreme Court Education In- 
formation Officer 

Murray's attorney said 
there was prosecutorial miscon- 
duct in closing arguments dur- 
ing the month-long trial, and 
that the judge should not have 
permitted hearsay statements to 
others by the victim and brief 



testimony by a detective con- 
cerning Murray's later decision 
to decline an additional inter- 
view 

The court, however, reject- 
ed the claim, determining there 
was not a sufficient reason to 
reverse the verdict. 

Though Murray did not tes- 
tify in his case, he did speak at 
his sentencing hearing, calling 
the case a "fairy tale" and that 
he would not accept responsi- 
bility for an act he did not com- 
mit. 

Prosecutors, however, were 
suspicious of Murray because of 
his statements in a ntne-and-a 
half hour interview with detec- 
tives the night his ex-wife was 
killed Murray didn't even ask 
about how Ross died until two- 
and-a-half hours into the inter 
view 

"Although no one had in 
formed the defendant how Car- 
min died, he told the police in 
his interview that he would not 
have done anything 'like they 
were suggesting' because he 
was a 'thinking man,"' said Jus 
tice Robert E. Davis, writing 
for a unanimous court. "He ex- 
plained that if he were going to 




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4:4S am Sunday School 

1 1:00 am Sunuaj Worship 

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Baptist Campus Center 

tBOt Anderson Ave 539-3051 



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United Methodist Church 



Sundavs: WonKip 10:30 a.m. 
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Praiw Service 7 JO p.m. 

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commit a homicide, he would 
do it with an airborne poison 'or 
something really slick.' He later 
staled that he was 'having run 
with this from a CSI perspec- 
tive "' 

Ross' body was found by 
sheriffs deputies who were 
asked to check on her by her fi- 
ance, Larry Lima, who lived in 
California but was planning ti > 
move to Lawrence, according 
to police reports 

Ross, whose body was 
found on her living room floor, 
suffered 11 lacerations due to 
blunt force injury followed by 
1 3 stabs to the neck with a knife 
as well as defensive wounds on 
her arms, Keelover said Police 
officers reported the murder 
was one of the most gruesutiu. 
to take place in Douglas Coun 

ty 

Murray was found guilt \ 
of first -degree murder He was 
sentenced to life in prison, with 
the possibility of parole in 25 
years. He is completing his sen- 
tence at the El Dorado Correc- 
tional Facility 

Hit Asuxuittd Pr«i contributed to thn 



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Worthlji: HI. I it pm 

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»«» k ilatr.edu/hlllel 



St. Isidore's 

Catholic Student 

Center 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Tueiday-Thuriday 1000 p.m. 

Friday 12:10 p,m 

Saturday 5 p.m. 

Sunday 9:30 a.m., II a.m. 

Sun. 4:30 pm., 6p,m, 
Father Keith Weber, Chaplain 

1711 Denison 539-749 6j 



MANHATTAN 
MENNON1TE CHURCH j 

lOOO f-rcmoni S394019 '"■ 
| 

Worship: 10 45 SS: M0 

: Richanl i flnrhwa (iehnnjj. Pusturi j 

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after womhin 



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Senior Pulor: Pat 8emt*tt 

' HindkJp Virsuhk 



785-5377173 



First Presbyterian 

i>Mi^HHH Church 



9:15 a.m. Worship Service 

9il5 a.m. Sunday School 

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1 1:15 ft.m. Contemporary 

Worship Service 

It * MiC ..4,11. II. t'j.H.I 

801 Leovenworth • 537 OS 18 



n»«.ni>II>ti-Mii.ilili.illaii i 



K-State Wesley 

www.k-sute.edii/unicin 

ksuwesleyffksu.edu 

785.776.9278 

Worship & Dinner: 

Sunday, 6:45pm • 

College Ave. United Methodist Church 




MANHATTAN FRIENDS QUAKER MEETING 

Un programmed Quiet Meetings, 10- 11 tun 

First Sunday of each month, Sept.-May 

UFM Building, 1221 Thurston 

Discussion and Visiting, 1 1 am-noon 

Historically rook-d in the Judeo-Chritiian tradition, 

contemporary unprogrammed Quaker Meetings often 

include both Christian and non-Christian members. 

Manhattan Friends support the testimonies ol 

Simplicity, Community, mm-vioti I A At don, 

Equality of race, gender, sexual orientation, 

physical ability, age, das; and natnirutitv 

Other Meetings during the month in family homes, 
For more information, call 539-2046 or 539-2636 

- M WJ V* ■ n nt. » i .•■ ii i ei > 1 1 »j,UiL!lMLja ..U iig- 



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PAGE 4 



OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Cries of injustice 

Movies insensitively mock 
unplanned pregnancies 




KEISEY 
CHILDRESS 



I musl have missed the 
memo when unplanned pregnan- 
cy became funny Sometimes real 
life just isn't as 
humorous as it 
would seem in 
the movies. 

"Juno," a 
movie written 
by a clever ex- 
stripper and 
one of the big- 
gest indie films 
to come along 
in a while, is 
about a 16- 
year-old getting 
pregnant by her best friend 

While it is charming, and the 
young love between Juno and her 
Paulie Bleeker seems very real, 
the entire event the plot is based 
on - a teenager getting pregnant 
- doesn't really amuse me. 

Movies about unplanned 
pregnancies like "Juno" and 
"Knocked Up" are making some 
thing funny that isn't funny at 
all According to the American 
Pregnancy Association, 468,988 
babies are born to teenage moth- 
ers every year Assuming the ma 
jority - if not all - of these are 
unplanned, this is not funny. 
This is a serious problem that 
shouldn't be taken lightly 

Even adults who have the 
resources to take care of an un- 
planned pregnancy and the sub- 
sequent child shouldn't have 
their situation treated humorous 
ly The Centers for Disease Con- 
trol & Prevention claimed that in 
2001, about one-half of pregnan- 
cies in the United States were 
unintended 

With Plan B, the "morning 
after pill," now available over the 
counter and contraceptives avail- 
able almost anywhere (even in 
public bathrooms), it is easier 
than ever to prevent pregnancy 

When a woman becomes 
pregnant with a baby she isn't 
ready for, she could give the 
baby up for adoption, which 



is an increasing burden on the 

state 

The slate must then take 
care of these children in group 
or foster homes until someone 
comes along to take I hem home 

Many children who go into 
foster care suffer sexual or phys 
ical abuse by their foster par- 
ents. The Admin istra 
lion of Children and Families, a 
division of the US Department 
of Health and Human Services, 
said in 2005 about 25 percent of 
children in foster homes were ex- 
periencing abuse More than 62 
percent of those cases were be 
cause of malnutrition and more 
than 9 percent were of a sexual 
nature. 

Pregnancies don't always 
end happily In the real world, 
the person who knocks you 
up might not be the guy you're 
meant to be with. He prubably 
won't be as cute as Michael Cera 
or as sweet as Seth Rogen 

The father might be some 
other girl's husband or a guy 
who already has 10 kids He 
probably doesn't love the moth- 
er and most likely won't be ex 
cited at the idea of having a baby 
to take eare of, especially if both 
parents are still in high school 

If Americans think un- 
planned pregnancy is so hilari- 
ous, what else will suddenly be- 
come funny'' Maybe drug addic- 
tions or domestic violence will 
be in the next big comedy block- 
buster 

Pain, suffering, awkwardness 
and desperation are starting lo 
define comedy 

Hollywood writers are chip- 
ping away trying to find hunnn 
out of anything they can lo make 
more money from, and 1 belu-vi 
unplanned pregnancy shouldn't 
be urn' of those things 



Kelsey Children u a senior in English 
literature ind creative writing. Please lend 

comments to opinion j ipuo.iiu.etfu. 




Kill K,IAN 



Racial remarks should not gain overage of media attention 




MARQUIS 
CLARK 



Earlier this month at 
the Mercedes-Benz Champi- 
onship, the season opening 
event of the 
PGA Tour, 
one sports 
caster made 
a comment 
that earned 
her a two- 
week sus- 
pension 
from her 
job 

During 
an on -air 
broadcast, 

in response to fellow Golf 
Channel anchor Nick Faldo's 
suggestion that in order to 
beat Tiger Woods on the golf 
course, young golfers "should 
just gang up [on Woods] for 
a while," his co-host Kelly 
Tilghman replied, "lynch him 
in a back alley" 

Imagine for a mo- 
ment that Tilghman's state- 
ment was completely inno- 
cent, only referring to the rel- 
ative impossibility of beat- 
ing Woods on the golf course 
She simply meant to be com- 
plimentary of his superior 



game Her comments weren't 
racist, and she doesn't see 
color at all. Lynching is a 
word unrelated to race that 
simply denotes "ganging 
up" on an opponent to en- 
sure victory. It could be true, 
but so could the opposite - 
she could be a card-carry 
ing Klan member - and it 
wouldn't matter. 

What should break the 
heart of the burgeoning so- 
cial activist is these issues get 
any attention at all While 
coverage of these remarks is 
limited to the sports world 
- perhaps the noose on the 
cover of Golfweek maga- 
zine was a bit much - we 
are not so far removed from 
the media circus that sur 
rounded Don Imus and Dog 
the Bounty Hunter Black 
US leaders spoke out and 
marched, and according to 
Coif com, Al Sharpton was 
on TV the next morning de- 
manding Ms Tilghman be 
fired 

Don Imus was fired 
and subsequently rehired af- 
ter a whirlwind mca culpa 
tour. Dog the Bounty Hunter 



was lambasted in the media, 
which led lo a tearful apology 
on Larry King Live complete 
with the earth-shattering re- 
alization that he was, in fact, 
not black 

Even dialogue about race 
in the 2008 presidential elec- 
tion focuses on candidates' 
comments and not their legis 
lativ-e history in dealing with 
the real -world concerns of 
America's con intimity of col- 
or 

It's sad the entirety of 
the modern-day civil -rights 
uiiivcinent gets geared up lo 
challenge marginal media fig- 
ures and their racist remarks, 
which have left perhaps tens 
dI minorities debilitated and 
scarred beyond repair. 

It's sad they utterly ig- 
nore the fact that, according 
to the 2006 edition of "The 
Covenant with Black Ameri- 
ca," 30 percent of black U.S. 
urban families live below the 
poverty line, more than 10 
percent of black people are 
unemployed and 32 percent 
of black US citizens have a 
zero or negative net worth 
Black people make up 44 



percent of the na- 
tion's prison pop- 
ulation but only 
12 percent of the 
country's popula- 
tion 

Forgive me 
if I'm not up in 
arms when a 
nMncastcr has ii 
bad day, or an old 
southern shock- 
jock calls some- 
one a name The 
problems lac- 
ing the U S black 
community are 
far more complex 
and far-reaching 
than any com- 
ments made on 
the fringes of the 
entertainment 
world 

During this 
time oi choosing 
our new leaders, 
we should not be 
distracted by the 
flitting aftershocks of rac- 
ism but instead analyze and 
deal with the real world is- 
sues facing America's minori 
ty population. 




Christina Klein | i OLl.H.IAN 



Marquis (lark is a graduate student In 
political science and women's studies. 
Please send comments to opinion ,i 
iovb.kiu.tdu. 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 



THE FOURUM 

7S3-19S-4444 . 

The Campus Fourum Is the 

Collegian's anonymous 
call-in system The Fourum 
1 ted to eliminate vulgar, 
racist, obscene and libelous 

nents. The [gmn, 
are noil he opinion of the 
Collegian nor are they 
. by the editorial staff. 

Hey, Fourum, stop printing stuff about 
the Stum 

Michael Beasley should shoot with his 
right hand when he gets bored. 

I take closure in knowing that Brett 
Favre would totally beat the crap out 
of Eli 

I bflie« my roommate has more North 
Face than a sorority gin. 

It bums when I pee. What should I do? 

fourum did you get your ears lowered? 

Just lo let everyone know, there is more 
than one person on the Kansas State 
University Horse Judging Team. 

You know it's been a good ntght if 
you've drank way too much Crown Royal 
and eaten an entire box of Cheetos. Well. 
I guess they're Cheez-lts. 

It shouldn't be called 'Across the 
Universe* It should be called "Across the 
Slum -verse" 

To a Ii of you student pedestrians out 
there that just step in front of moving 
vehicles, I hope when you get slammed 
by a car who's trying to drive carefully on 
campus that you don't sue anyone. 

By the way, a moving vehicle is several 
tons It takes a lot of energy to slop. It 
takes three watts for a student to stop 
walking for two seconds, Be green. 

Jon Wright, that article was completely 
true We do need to support Frank 
Martin more 

Who the hell made up Stunt? 

I'm not going to class today because 
yesterdays Collegian said U was Friday 

Apparently there should be no school 
on the 25th. because it's officially a 
Saturday. Thanks. Collegian 

For the hill Fourum, go to 

www.kitatttolttgian com. 



Collegian 



Jonathan Ganan 

iDrw >N CHIEF 

Saltna Strati | MIMGIKGEtJItO* 
Willow Williamson | MMMMfDUM 

o«*n Ktnncor | mm row 

Hannah Slick | (OPVCHitl 

Scott Glrtnt | COWflttl 

Anntn* liwlail I MULllMIDlMDIW 

sh.ii t Eiiij|i*HPusttHr(jt 

Aln Peak | IH{ EDGC EDIW 

Brandon St*in*rt | METRO [Dm)" 

Ktlwy Notl I OPINION smTOB 

Windy Hiun | SPORT'S I WW 

Jo.ii.mion | scorns low* 

Nicole Jonnwon | SPi CI»L VtCHOKS IDUM 

T)rl« RtynoMi | *D U*M(M 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

ntWitinpubMu.ttlti 

Kedzie 10 J, Manhattan, KS66S06 

DISPLAY ADS... 7B5-53M560 

CLASSIFIED ADS 785-S32-6555 

DELIVERY 78S-SJ2-6SSS 

NEWSROOM. 78S-5H-65S6 ; 

lETItfU TO TBI EDITOR 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to (hi 
editor. They can be submitted by e-mail 
to ltttrnviptib.kui.edti, or in person lo 
Kedzie lift Please include your lull name, 
year in school and map! letters should be 
limited to JSO words. All submitted tetters 
might be edited tor length and clarity. J 



TO THE POINT 

Potential placement of Hy-Vee not best location for expansion 

Manhattan looks a lot in some cases, gotten a fall 2004, there was no fourth large grocery store Coach Bill Snyder High- chains The city should 
liferent today than it bad deal. 1HOP or Best Buy, and in a small area, along way. strive to offer an envi- 



Manhattan looks a lot 
different today than it 
did, say, four years ago 
Many business- 
es have staked 
a claim in Man 
hattan, and 
for the most 
part, residents 
have approved. 
But as nation- 
al chains have moved to 
Manhattan, the city has, 



TOTHf POINT isan 
editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after 
a majority opinion 
is formed This is 
the Collegian's 
official opinion. 



in some cases, gotten a 
bad deal. 
The area around the 
intersection of 
Fort Riley Bou- 
levard and Blue 
mont Avenue 
has been the fo- 
cus of much of 
the development 
in the city When 
incoming freshmen ar- 
rived in Manhattan in 



fall 2004, there was no 
1HOP or Best Buy, and 
these business have now 
been welcomed by most 
residents. 

The area is now also 
a possible location for a 
Hy-Vee grocery store. We 
are glad that Manhattan 
is bringing in businesses 
and jobs, but if a Hy-Vee 
is built near Bluemunt 
Avenue, it will be the 



fourth large grocery store 
in a small area, along 
with Wal-Mart, Dillon's 
and Walgreens. Perhaps 
a better place would be 
closer to campus or to 
other residential areas 
Many parts of Man- 
hattan would welcome a 
business like Hy-Vee, but 
for some reason, busi- 
nesses seem to set up 
shop soon after they exit 



Coach Bill Snyder High- 
way. 

There is nothing 
wrong with national 
chains, but if Manhat- 
tan starts to lose its lo- 
cally owned businesses, 
like Bob's Diner, the city 
could lose its college- 
town feel as well. Man- 
hattan should encourage 
local businesses to open 
and expand, and bigger 



chains The city should . 
strive to offer an envi- 
ronment that is friendly 
to both locally and non- 
locally owned establish- 
ments. 

We are glad Man- 
hattan is growing, but • 
it should grow for the 
needs of Manhattan res^ 
idents, not just for the 
wants of big chain busi- 
nesses. 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25. 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 5 



WHO HAS YOUR VOTE 



I'r 

Women voters strive to educate 
themselves on more than gender 



This will be the second 
article in a fav-week se- 
ries examining the vot 
ing beluanm of different 
groups within society and 
their effects on the 2008 
presidential election. In 
the next few weeks, the 
Collegian will examine 
the electoral effects of the 
black, military and reli- 
gious communities na 
tionally and locally, m 
that order. 

By Willow Williamson 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The gender issues of the 
2008 presidential election 
are making everyone walk on 
lippy-toes. Does Hillary Clin- 
ton, D-N.Y.. have the worn 
en's vote, and what are wom- 
en interested in for the up- 
coming election? 

In the 2004 presidential 
election, women comprised 
60,1 percent of the vote, 
which amounted to about 8 8 
million more women voters 
than men, according to the 
Web site for the Center for 
American Women and Poli- 
tics at Rutgers University 

The gap between men 
and women in this election 
was greater than any oth- 
er year. In the 2000 election, 
though the number of female 
votes still beat the number of 
male votes, it was by only 3.4 
million votes. 

Considering the make- 
up of the candidates for this 
year's presidential election, 
it would seem Clinton, who 
could become the first wom- 
an president in history, could 
easily gain the majority of the 
women voters, however, at 
least on the K-State campus, 
Clinton will need to rely on 
more than jusl her gender to 
get her into the Oval Office. 

Many female K-State stu- 
dents and faculty are focus- 
ing on current issues instead 
of gender, race and party af 
filiation. 

"1 think people should 
vote for candidates based on 
their issues and certainly not 
based on their gender," said 
Angela Hubler, director of 
women's studies. 

She said her students 
have said many different is- 
sues are important for a can- 
didate, including social secu- 
rity, alternative energy sourc- 
es, education, expanding 
medical insurance to low in- 
come children, paid paren- 
tal leave, withdrawing troops 



WOMEN'S VOTING FACTS 

Women note in Mfhf> nunrbrn than 
mm, and haw done m in t wry fW 
tim ww MM. In MOO, JS mWttfi 
cnoj* women wttd than mm &d 

Women hue voted at higher rain 
than mm ww WW. in MOO. V>.1% 
of feoKWied muxiw wten went fc 
At pots, csmjwed to il.1% of mate 



Man women nojisttr to vote than 
men. Some 61 ? mtflon Mxnen were 
rtgfctmd to vote In 2000 comoaiwl 
to $9.4 mMnn men Initial reports 
show (he trend wM continue m M04 

Women ire law deoderv and make 
«fl i Mfhtr number of undecided 
and swing voters than men. Women 
are 60% o( undecided Mwly voters 
«rt the latest Battleground Traduno 
Poll conducted by lilt Snell Perry 
I) Associates and me tanance Group 
(Oct 18-21) 

— rwi^n mummy wev ww 




from Iraq, gay rights and 
abortion laws 

"Women are concerned 
about everything," Hubler 
said "Women are not con- 
cerned with only gender-spe 
cific issues" 

Lydia Peclc, student 
body vice president and se- 
nior in math education, said 
she has not yet chosen a fa- 
vorite candidate, but she will 
focus on issues like the en 
vironment, health care, the 
war, the economy and cduca 
lion when making her deci- 
sion. 

"I won't vote Republi- 
can or Democrat because 
they are Republican or Dem 
ocrat," Peele said. "I will be 
looking at issues and voting 
that way" 

She said students should 
be looking for positive solu- 
tions to problems in the U.S. 
and not focusing on what 
gender, race or party affil- 
iation the candidates with 
whom they align themselves 

"Something I would like 
to do is lead by example and 
help students find the re- 
sources to get the informa 
tion," Peele said. 

Kimberly Agwu. secre 
tary for the Black Student 
Union and junior in pre 
nursing, also said it is impor- 
tant for women to keep up to 
date on the election 

"[Students should) re- 
search and educate them 
selves for what is important 
to them and look toward the 
future." Agwu said 



She said some of the 
most important issues for 
her are health eare. Social 
Security and the economy 
She said Clinton and Barack 
Obama, D-lll best represent 
what she is looking for in a 
candidate. 

"They both speak for the 
minority, j Obama | being an 
African-American and (Clin 
ton| being a woman," she 
said 

One of the most impor- 
tant issues for many wom- 
en on campus focuses on the 
Iraq war 

Agwu said she hopes the 
next president will help bring 
the U.S. troops out of Iraq, 
which in turn, she said could 
save the U.S. money, which 
could be used for other im- 
portant issues like health 
care. 

Lindsey Kelley, soph- 
omore in pre- professional 
health education, also said 
the Iraq war is an important 
issue, which will affect how 
she votes 

Kelley said she thinks the 
U.S never should have gone 
to Iraq in the first place and 
the troops should be brought 
home, however, now that 
troops are there, she said the 
U.S. can not leave too early 

"We've opened a can of 
wurms," she said. "We need 
to stay and lake care of the 
people there" 

Kelley said the candi- 
dates should focus more on 
issues instead of degrading 
each other and fighting all of 
the time 

She said they should 
work together and go across 
party lines 

As an independent, she 
said she would like to see an 
increase in the importance of 
third parties 

Overall, Kelley said the 
most important thing for 
women is to slay educated. 

* Ud some research." she 
said "Know who you're vot- 
ing for and vole. Thai's the 
biggest cliche ever, but you 
have a voice. Use it" 



EXERCISE EXTRAVAGANZA 




Be sure to stop by the West Fitness Center for this FREE, FUN event! 
Meet Mercy's certified exercise instructors and sample all of our classes. 
Come and go to this 3-hour event or stay for the duration! Bring a friend 
- non-members are welcome too. We'll have prize giveaways, healthy 
snacks and extra spots for child care so everyone can participate 



Mercy Fitticst* WEST 
31S Seih Child Road 
(nrxi hi Willn-V) 
(785) 587-5485 



# 



MERCY 

R t G I O N A L 

ii i \ i in i i \ i i i, 



Mi rev Fiinens EAST 
455 East Poynfz Avenue 

i K M.i H Mil [ip iiu Center) 
(785 i 565-4722 



City street closure hinders busing, 
relocates school drop-off point 



Saturday, February 2nd 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. 




Joslyn Brown | •"UH.ian 
A school bus watts For children to board. The road is closed on Leavenworth street between 1 7th and 
Delaware strews 



By Annette Lawless 

KANSA-iMUHOUFdlAN 

A new city water-line 
project has put a damper on 
one Manhattan school - and 
might be putting sonic chil- 
dren in danger 

TAvo-block road closings 
in front of Eugene Field Head 
Start Building, located at 
1700 Leavenworth St., have 
restricted drop-off points for 
the school. 

The road is closed on 
Leavenworth between 17 th 
and Delaware streets, said 
school officials 

On the first day oi the 
road closures, parents and 
school buses were asked to 
relocate their drop off-points 
to a block awuy. walking the 



3- and 4-year-old children 
across the 17th Street in- 
tersection, said Sally Frick. 
school director 

"It's pretty much been 
complete chaos," Frick said 
h can be very dangerous" 

Prick said Ihe recon 
struclion hit the school by 
surprise, but the staff has 
tried to adapt as best as pos 
sible 

Because of the change, 
Frick said her staff now 
walks the children to and 
from school buses, even serv- 
ing as crossing guards on the 
narrow street 

"This closure has cre- 
ated a very challenging sit- 
uation for the children and 
families who attend school at 
the Eugene Field Head Start 



Building." said Michelc tones, 
communication coordinator 
for Manhattan -Ogdcn USD 
383 

Though the street clo- 
sure might be considered a 
nuisance for some, lones said 
the city has worked with the 
school to allow parking along 
nearby blocks that oihcrwisc 
have restricted parking. 

School officials said Ihey 
are unsure how long the 
road closure will last, but un 
til then, they will work with 
the city to keep students safe 
District officials said they ask 
people to drive with caution 
near the school construc- 
tion 

The city of Manhattan 
was not available for com- 
ment 



Need something to do? 

Try SuDoku 



Located on the classified page 




This Call is a Good Call 



Using the Aggieville 
Pick-Up Station 

• There is no need to call SafeRide 
if using the Aggieville Station 

• The Pick-Up station is at Willie's 
Car Wash, 12th & Bluemont 



What is SafeRide? 

SafeRide is free service, by K-State 
in conjunction with a Taxi Service to 
provide students with a safe ride to 
their home from any location in the 
city limits of Manhattan 

How do I use SafeRide if 
I'm not in Aggieville? 

1. Call 539-0480 

2. Give your name, location 
and home address 

3. Wait at location for taxi 

4. Show a K State Student ID to the 
taxi driver 

A free service provided by the K-State Student Governing Association 



Every Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday 

11 :00 p.m. -3:00 a.m. 



St. Petersburg Ballet Theatre 




January 31 at 7:30 p./rf. 

McCain Conversation with David Ollington 
Room 201 McCain at 6:30 p.m 




Campus Phone Books 



you can finally Buy A Book on sale NOW in Kedrie 103 

WORTH ITS PRICE 



mm 



PAGE 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 



Fresh faces 

ISU brings freshman-led crew 

to Bramlage to face young 

Wildcat basketball team 




Left: 

Freshman 
forward Sill 
Walker 
K State will 
play Iowa 
State at S 
p.m. Saturday 
at Bramlage 
Coliseum. 
Below: 
Freshman 
guard Jacob 
Pulltn 
dn botes 
through the 
lane during 
trie Tews 
A&M wm, 

JollynBmwn 
COLUF,(ilAN 



By Joel Jtlllion 
KANSAS tTATBCOUBGUM 

The last time K-Stale 
opened conference play 
with a 3 record, several of 
the current Wildcats were 
nut even born 

K-Stale (13 4. 3-0 Big 
12 Conference) achieved 
that mark during the 1987- 
88 season, a year thai end 
ed in the Midwest Regional 
and Elite Eight of ihe NCAA 
Tournament 

With a team made up of 
several freshmen, the Wild 
cats arc reaching several 
marks which have nol been 
reached during their life 
times 

Even the players who were 
alive during the "87-88 sea 
son were all very young 

The Wildcats' current 
attitude? They aren't going 
to let up on breaking school 
records or be afraid to set 
their own. Freshman guard 
lacob Pullen said the recent 
success is a reflection of the 
effort K State has been dis- 
playing on the court 

"We are working hard 
and thai s what we try to do 
when we come in [Bram- 
lage), we try to always pre- 
pare ourselves to get bet- 
ter," Pullen said "We want 
to keep breaking records for 
K-State and we want to do 
things K-State hasn't done 
in a while"' 

Pullen also attributed 
t Ik- achievements to recent 
maturity as a team, espe- 
cially after the Wildcats lost 
103-77 lo Xavier Dec. 31, a 
game he called a wake up 
call. 



"We had just beat a lew 
teams and it was a wake up 
call, losing by 20 points," he 
said "IBeastey] didn't have 
a good game and it made us 
realize what we had to do lo 
be a good team " 

K State isn't resting on 
its 3-0 Big 12 record, though 
the inclination to do so 
might be strong Freshman 
forward Bill Walker point- 
ed out the conference title is 
the overall goal 

"It's nice lo be 3 0. but 
the big picture is the Big 12 
and we're going to have to 
In :i good team to do that," 
Walker said 

The next chance to con- 
tinue the Big 12 winning 
streak comes Saturday with 
a 7 p m. game against Iowa 
State at Bramlage Coliseum 
Iowa State* 12-7. 2 2 Big 12) 
is coming off an 83-59 loss 
in Kansas in Lawrence and 
has won nine of its last 12 
games. 

The Cyclones have lost 
their last six games in Bram- 
lage. 

"They're not a bad 
team, they gave Kansas a 
good run for a while," Pullen 
said "We are just trying lo 
focus on pressuring the ball, 
so they don't play a lot to 
the guards and try to make 
I their guards) work to han- 
dle the ball" 

The Cyclones are led by 
freshman forward Wesley 
Johnson, who is scoring 19 
points per game in the Big 
12 Iowa State is also get- 
ting production from fresh- 
man forward Craig Brack- 
ins, who is putting up 188 
points per conference game 





ildcat women's basketball team 
attempts 1st 6-0 start in 7 years 



Joslyn Brown [ CULL h, IAN 
Junior guard Shalt* terming hooks a shot over an Iowa State 
defender Lehning and K-State will fa<e Oklahoma State Sunday in 
Stillwater, OMa. 



By Mike Devader 
KANSAS MAlHOtl.H.lAN 

The K State women's bas- 
ketball team will put its eight 
game winning streak ' on the 
line when it travels lo Stillwa- 
ter, Okla , to play No. 13 Okla- 
homa State at 130 p.m. on 
Sunday 

The Wildcats have a 
chance to start Big 12 Confer 
ence action 6-0. bul they will 
also have to defy history to get 
the job done. 

Since the 2001 season, K 
State has started conference 
play 5 twice, bul road games 
immediately following both 
live-game winning streaks end- 
ed in defeat In 2001. the team's 
first conference loss came in a 
game at Oklahoma State 

The Cowgirls come into 
this matchup 4-1 in confer 
ence play, with their only blem- 
ish coming in an upset loss 
Wednesday to the Texas Long- 
horns, 70 63 Texas beating 



Oklahoma Stale might come as 
a surprise to some people, but 
K- Slate coach Deb Patterson 
said nothing shocks her when 
it comes to competition in the 
Big 12 

"This is an unbelievably 
tough, competitive league," Pat- 
terson said Teams are going 
lo finish this league with losses 
you don't see in the other pow- 
er oonfarencea." 

Oklahoma Slate was on an 
eight-game winning streak be- 
fore its loss to the Umghorns, 
and coincidentally. the Wild- 
cats have won eight straight 
games as the\ prepare lot Sun 
day's game Even after losing 
their last game. Patterson said 
she is amazed by the way the 
Cowgirls are playing basketball 
right now 

"The OSU team is play- 
ing extraordinary, they arc very 
confident," Patterson said. "The 
challenge is going to be extraor 
dinary" 

One of those challenges the 



Wildcats will face is Oklahoma 
State freshman point guard An- 
drea Riley, who had 15 points 
and five assists in the losing ef- 
fort against Texas Junior point 
guard Shake Lehning, who will 
be matching up against Riley, 
said it is too early in the year 
to get caught up in which teams 
are winning and losing 

"We can't get worried 
about what is going on, we 
just have lo remain focused on 
what we are doing," Lehning 
said. "It's still a battle; it's Big 
12 basketball every night" 

I'n some, accumulating a 
good record in conference play 
mighl be important, bul Patter- 
sun and the Wildcats said that 
to be successful on the road 
at Oklahoma Stale, thoughts 
about starting 6-0 in the Big 12 
are irrelevant 

" We need to work pass-by- 
pass, game -by-game." Patterson 
said. "Every night out is a war, 
and no one is guaranteed a vic- 
tory" 



K-STATE FOOTBALL 



2008 K-State Spring Game to feature Goo Goo 
Dolls concert, Gridiron Ultimate Fan Competition 



Spring Game 2008 will 
have another big attraction 
to bring people to Snyder 
Family Stadium April 18 and 
19 

The Goo Goo Dolls will 
be performing a eoneert April 
18 at the stadium Tickets 
for seating on the field will 
be $44 and bleacher seating 
will be $38. The concert will 
be part of the Gridiron Bash 
Ultimate Fan Competition, 
a contest as part of the USA 
Today Bash for Cash series 
which will establish which 



of the participating universi- 
ties has the most passionate 
and supportive fans. 

K-State will be go- 
ing up against several Divi- 
sion I-A schools for the ti- 
tle of I he ultimate fan. Along 
with K State in the competi- 
tion will be Army, Colorado. 
Kentucky, Penn State, Rut- 
gers, Tennessee, Texas A&M 
and West Virginia The judg- 
es ",iii go around lailgat- 
ing zones, pep rallies, au- 
tograph sessions und chalk 
ta'ks with alumni They will 



also check out the faji inter 
active zones, the final team 
practice and the reception to 
the concert 

The winning university 
will receive SI million do- 
nation to its genera] scholar 
ship fund The second place 
winner will receive $500,000 
and third place will receive 
$250,000 

The tickets will be on 
sale to the general at the 
Bramlage Coliseum ticket 
office Feb 14, They can ei- 
ther be purchased online at 



www.kstatesports.com ur 
at wwwgridironbash.com 
or from the athletic depart- 
ment. 

The Goo Goo Dolls have 
produced eight albums to 
dale, with a second Greatest 
Hils album due oul in stores 
in February, according to 
their Web site The second 
compilation album will in- 
clude live performances and 
other rarities. They began re- 
cording in 1986. 

— K-SUtt Sporti Information 



KSU to be 
on ESPN 



K-State men's basket- 
ball will now be going out to 
an even larger audience. 

The three remaining 
games that were slated to 
be on FSN-Midwest, Sat- 
urday's game against Iowa 
State, Feb. 6 against Nebras- 
ka and Feb 23 against Bay 
lor, will be available as part 
of ESPN's Full Court pack- 
age They were moved to al- 
low more fans to see the 
key Big 12 matchups. Since 
FSN's viewing area is re- 
stricted to homes in Kansas 
and the Kansas City area, 
this will allow other areas lo 
see Wildcat basketball 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 

Wildcats 

flip switch, 

find some 

balance 



Airing this week on 
the K-State men's basket- Z 
ball "Variety Hour." fresh ; 
man forward and comedian 
Michael Bcasley. freshman 
guard and tight rope aero- : 
bat Jacob Pullen, "Interviews 
with the Stars" by junior fur- 
ward Andre "Gumble" Gil- - 
berl, and. as always, your K 
Slate Pep Band, under l re- 
direction of freshman for- 
ward Bill Walker 

Welcome, ladies and 
gentlemen, to the show that 
is K-State men's basket- - 
ball. Yes, this year's group of 
Wildcats has displayed many 
personalities while modeling 
an assortment of hats off the 
court, but a single cohesive 
unit is beginning to emerge 
on the court 

This group of freshmen. 
combined with some salty 
upperclassmcn, is starting to 
turn the corner in the ear 
ly Big 12 Conference sea- 
son The defense that was 
once non-existent (for en 
ample, Xavier on Dec 31) 
is becoming one of the best 
in the conference The Wild 
cals held Colorado to 56 
points in Boulder, Colo . lim- 
ited Texas A&M to five field 
goals in the second half lasi 
Saturday and forced Oklaho- 
ma to commit 16 turnovers 
in the conference opener. 

It is almost as if this K- 
Stale team has the treasured 
ability to "flip the switch." 
When it comes time to step 
onto Ihe court, the Wild 
cats treat the game with the 
mentality that it is indeed 
business time It is a trait 
thai is coveted by the besl 
of college and NBA teams 
- having the ability lo stay 
grounded with Ihe sireel 
clolhes on. then become dif- 
ferent animals when the Jor- 
dans are laced up. 

Some fans mighl have 
seen the Internet videos or 
press conference interview 
clips that display this bunch 
of Wildcats as jokesters, 
pranksters and just a group ! 
of guys who like having fun,! 
which technically, they are. ■ 
Sure, it is much easier lo 
have fun when you arc win- 
ning on the court, but the 
righl mix of child-like be- 
havior and professionalism 
is what this basketball learn 
needs at this juncture of the 
season. So far that philoso- 
phy seems lo be working for 
the 13-4 Wildcats 

Wednesday's game at 
Colorado was just a good in- 
dication of how much this 
learn cares about winning, 
despite its obvious split- 
personality disorder If you 
couldn't see the angst that 
Walker constantly displayed, 
or the frustration that Beas- 
ley took out on the rim after 
a break-away steal, then you 
certainly are not viewing this 
team as you should be 

On the hardwood the 
past three weeks, K-State 
has been playing as hard, or 
harder, than any other team 
in Ihe country The defense 
is making fantastic stride., 
and we will see how (ar it 
has come, as it takes on the 
most prolific offense in the 
nation when Kansas cuiius 
to town next Wednesday 

We have a fun-lov- 
ing, hard working basket 
ball team in Manhattan right 
now, and hopefully the fans 
can return the favor There 
are only seven more home 
games left in Ihis 2007 OS 
basketball season Only sev- 
en more times to watch Bill 
and Mike dunk in person; 
only seven more limes to 
see Clent Slewarl mock the 
old Michael Jordan and Lar- 
ry Bird McDonald's eon 
mercials (see the behind-the- 
head three-point shot); and* 
only seven more limes as 
students and fans to verbally 
beat down opposing teams 
It all starts tomorrow 
against Iowa Stale, so get 
ready. Bring your paper, your 
voice, wear your purple and 
sport that young and cra- 
zy attitude The team will be 
displaying all of those things, 
so why nol do Ihe same'* 



folly WlUiiint ii 4 senior In secondary 
education. Pleas* if nd comments to 
iportitaj pub. ksu.edu, 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25,2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 7 



K-State track squad to team up Two Manhattan veterinary hospitals 
with Big 1 2 competitors Saturday differ in boarding, grooming services 




Jeslyrt Brawn | i 01 I.KOIAN 

Juntoi Lorcn Grave* competes in the women's weight throw at the Wildcat Invitational Jan. 19. Groves 
received an NCAA automatic bid for her efforts in the invitational 



By Joel Aschbrcnntr 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The track and field team 
will meet with two of its usu- 
al competitors to represent 
the Big 12 Conference in the 
Conference Challenge this 
Saturday in Lincoln, Neb 

K Stale will combine 
with Nebraska and Missouri 
to take on Colorado State, 
Brigham Young and Air Force, 
the representatives from the 
Mountain West Conference. 

K- State coach Cliff Rovel 
to said the three Big 12 teams 
have the right tools to be suc- 
cessful in the meet (hat pits 
the two conferences against 
each other 

"These three schools 
are schools that arc relative 
ly complete." Kovelto said 
"We've been a complete team 
traditionally. Nebraska's been 
a historically complete team. 
Missouri has good quality 
throwers and good distance 
runners." 

The Wildcats are enter- 
ing I he meet after a strong 
showing at last week's Wild- 
cat Invitational Juniors Lo- 
re n Groves and Scott Sellers 
were named Big 12 Athletes 
of the Week following the in- 



vitational Groves broke a K 
Stale women's record in the 
weight throw with a throw of 
69-11.50. The loss earned her 
an NCAA automatic bid. Sell- 
ers also earned an automatic 
bid when he cleared a height 
of 7-4.50 in the high jump. 

The Conference Chal 
lenge will be scored as a dual 
meet Each team will be able 
to enter two athletes in an 
event, and the two top per- 
formers from each confer- 
ence will be scored Rovelto 
said he does not mind the dif- 
ferent format for the meet 

"Having some scored 
meets is nice," Rovelto said 
"In our sport, we do not 
have many of them anymore. 
In our sport, they've gone 
away from that Most meets 
now are more like lime trials 
where everyone can just run 
fast" 

Rovelto said meets like 
the Conference Challenge are 
important for the team, be- 
cause they provide good prac 
tice competing at a scored 
meet before the team com- 
petes in the Big 12 and NCAA 
Championships. 

"We always try to work in 
three or four scored meets in 
the indoor and outdoor sea- 



son," Rovelto said 

In a meet where schools 
are grouped together on one 
team, coaches can use their 
athletes in a way that does not 
put as much strain on them 

"In this case where it's 
three schools frum one con- 
ference com peting togeth- 
er, you're not forced to have 
all your athletes in their best 
event," Rovelto said "It's 
more forgiving You don't 
have to double up as many 
kids" 

Despite the fact (hat the 
teams often compete against 
each other, Rovelto said it 
will not be awkward team- 
ing up with Missouri and Ne- 
braska. Because of how often 
K-State competes with these 
teams, many of the athletes 
on each team know each oth 
er and are relatively close 

[oining up with other 
teams is not new to the Wild- 
cats either Last year, the learn 
competed in the |im Click 
Shootout in Tucson, Ariz. The 
Wildcats paired up with Tex- 
as Tech to represent the Big 
12 against the Pacific 10 Con- 
ference and the Southeastern 
Conference The Big 12 rep- 
resentatives finished third in 
the competition. 



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By Conn* Brisendlne 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Decisions, decisions 
Two veterinary hospitals 
operate in Manhattan and 
pet owners routinely make 
choices about which one 
better suits their needs 

The K-State Veterinary 
Medical Teaching Hospital 
offers services like vaccina- 
tions, overall wellness ex 
ams, dental care, flea and 
tick prevention and minor 
surgery. 

"Our job is to find [the 
problem] and give them ad- 
vice," said Susan Nelson, as- 
sistant professor of clinical 
sciences "We make recom- 
mendations based on life 
styles and tailor (our servic 
es] to individuals" 

VMTH offers special 
service packages for kittens, 
puppies, and senior pets The 
puppy and kitten packages 
include all the core vaccina- 
tions, four wellness exams, 
two fecal exams for intestinal 
parasites, spaying and neu- 
tering, microchip implanta- 
tion, flea and tick treatment, 
de -worming and nail trim for 



each visit for one year, ac- 
cording to the VMTH Web 
site, untrat.vet.k-state.edu/ 
depts/VMTH/mdex.htm 

VMTH performs mi- 
nor surgeries such as mi- 
nor wound repair and lump 
removal It also provides 
health certificates for owners 
who travel nationally and in 
temationally. 

VMTH is open Mon 
day through Friday. It also is 
open on some Saturdays by 
appointment only for vacci- 
nations. 

Little Apple Veterinary 
Hospital is a full-service 
hospital and provides medi 
cations, surgical procedures, 
dental care and vaccines 
Where this vet hospital dif- 
fers from VMTH is it offers 
boarding and grooming ser- 
vices as well. 

"Everything can be done 
while | the pet] is there," said 
Tom Lindquist, owner of Lit- 
tle Apple Veterinary Hospi- 
tal. 

The grooming services 
include bathing, brushing, 
treating cuts, shaves, matted 
hair removal and nail paint- 
ing. 



Pet boarding can be 
for one day or up to sever- 
al weeks Little Apple treats 
pels to outdoor walks in an 
enclosed wooded area three 
limes a day. 

Clients also can pur- 
chase one -on -one play time 
for their pet during their 
pet's stay Play times and 
types of play are up to the 
owner. Some types of play 
include fetch, tug -of war 
and sitting in an attendant's 
lap Grooming and boarding 
prices for dogs are based on 
the weight and breed of the 
dog. while cat owners pay a 
flat rate 

Catering to its clients, 
Little Apple has installed 
separate quarters for cats 
boarding away from dogs 
They also provide front desk 
kennels for quick drop off 
and pick-up. 

"If you have to leave [a 
pet] somewhere, it is best 
to have a professional tak- 
ing care of them," said Der- 
ek Brake, graduate student 
in ruminant nutrition and 
client of Little Apple Hospi- 
tal "They're close and con- 
venient" 



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Little Apple Veterinary Hospital, located at 909 S. Seth Child Road., is a full- service hospital and provides 
medications, surgical procedures, dental care and vaccines. The hospital is open Monday through Friday. 



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Claflin Books and Copies 

congratulates award 

winners at the ACP 

Journalism Convention in 

Washington, D.C. 

Royal Purple Staff- Pacemaker Award 
Catrina Rawson - 2nd Place, Sports Photography 
Emily Lawrence - 2nd Place, Newspaper Front Pages 
Christopher Hanewinckel - 3rd Place, Feature Photography 
Bonnie Lee - 3rd Place, Editorial Cartoons 

Thanks 

to those who went above 

and beyond during finals 

week to assist in the 

production of the 

Manhattan Mercury when 

they were without power. 

Brendan Praeger 

Megan Moser 

Brett King 

Alex Yocunt 

Jonathan Garten 

Christina Forsberg 







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»*■■ t «- . 



PAGE 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25,200c 



World briefs 




BLAST COULD SIGNAL 
AL-QAIOA ROLE IN MOSUL 

BAGHDAD - The aban 
doned apartment block 
known as the Pepsi building 
vanished in seconds, leaving 
a 30-foot-deep blast crater 
and a ring uf destruction for 
a quarter mile in every direc 
in m through a shanty district 
in Mosul 

Then on Thursday - even 
before the final death count 
was tallied - came more 
bloodshed: A suicide bomber 
killed a police chief and two 
other officers as they toured 
the devastation from the pre 
vious day Residents with in- 
surgent sympathies taunted 
the chief moments before the 
attack 

Two deadly days have un- 
derscored what some U.S 
mililary commanders fear is 
ahead for the northern city: 
that al Qaida in Iraq could be 
prepared to use all means of 
chaos and violence to defend 
its last urban redoubt 
The stakes are high on both 
sides. 

Al -Qaida and its supporters 
would find themselves with- 
out a major base of opera- 
tions if ousted from Iraq's 
third largest city, which oc- 
cupies transport crossroads 
between Baghdad, Syria and 
other points 

SHOOTINGS IGNITE 

RACIAL TENSIONS 

CAPE TOWN. South Afri 
ca - Protesters tried to force 
their way into the court hear 
ing Thursday of a white teen- 
ager charged with a shoot- 
ing rampage in a black set- 
tlement that left four people 
dead, including a mother and 
her infant 
The bloodshed on Jan 14 in 



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the Skielik settlement. 100 
miles northwest of Johannes- 
burg, has ignited racial ten- 
sions that remain close to the 
surface more than a decade 
after the end of South Afri 
ca's apartheid system 
Kiot police were called in to 
control the dozens of black 
protesters who gathered out- 
side theSwartruggens District 
Court, trying to push through 
(he compound gates as 18- 
yeur-old lohan Nel made a 
brief appearance inside He 
faces charges of murder and 
attempted murder 
The crowd waved signs say- 
ing " no bail, let him rot in 
jail." the South African Press 
Association reported Police 
pushed the group was pushed 
to the side of the street. 
Police are unclear un a mo- 
tive, but Skielik's residents 
allege that Nel killed out of 
racial hatred 

BRAZIL TO COMBAT 
DEFORESTATION 

BRASILIA, Brazil Brazil 
will combat rising deforesta- 
tion in the Amazon by send 
ing extra federal police and 
environmental agents to ar- 
eas where illegal clearing of 
the rain forest jumped dra- 
matically last year, officials 
said Thursday 

Authorities will monitor the 
areas in an attempt to pre 
vent anyone from trying to 
plant crops or raise cattle 
there, Environment Minister 
Marina Silva said. 
The new measures were an- 
nounced after President Luiz 
Inacio Lula da Silva called an 
emergency meeting of Cab- 
in el ministers because new 
data showed an apparent re- 
versal ol a three-year slow- 
down in the Amazon defor- 
estation rate. 



The clearing of Brazil's Ama- 
zon rain forest jumped in the 
final months of 2007, spurred 
by high prices for corn, soy 
and cattle 

Agriculture Minister Rein- 
hold Stephanes said Latin 
America's largest nation has 
plenty of available land for 
farming and cattle that has al- 
ready been deforested Envi- 
ronmentalists fear sugarcane, 
used here to produce ethanol, 
could spread through the rain 
forest, but most ethanol oper- 
ations arc in southern Brazil 
far from the Amazon 

U.N. POWERS AGREE ON 

MORE IRAN SANCTIONS 

UNITED NATIONS - Major 
UN Security Council pow 
ers have agreed on an incre 
menial increase in sanctions 
on Iran, including a new re- 
striction on exporters doing 
business with the country, 
diplomats said Thursday 

A draft resolution also 
calls for more monitoring of 
Iran's military and financial 
institutions, broader travel 
bans on Iranian nuclear sci- 
entists and other key offi- 
cials, and freezing the assets 
of people and banks linked 
to weapons proliferation, Se- 
curity Council diplomats told 
The Associated Press 

Diplomats from the five 
nations with veto power on 
the council - the U.S., Russia, 
China, Britain and France - 
spent a third day negotiating 
a final agreement on princi- 
ples that would form the ba- 
sis fur a third round of U.N. 
sanctions on Iran They were 
joined by Germany, which 
has lung been involved in ef- 
forts to resolve the Iran nu- 
clear dispute 

— Th* Associated Frets 




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Lisle Ald«rton | COLLKUAN 

R*ld Carlson, a |unio( at Clay Center Community High School. Jumps into the pool at Ahearn Field 
House's Natatorium after Manhattan High School's swim team practice Thursday. Carlson, the only state 
qualifier for MHS, participates on the MHS team because CCCHS does not have a swim team. 

Democrat Dennis Kucinich is 
abandoning bid for White House 



THE »nm» lATBDMtBSS 

CLEVELAND - Dem 
ocrat Dennis Kucinich is 
abandoning his second, 
long-shot bid for the White 
House as he faces a tough 
fight to hold onto his other 
job - US congressman 

In an interview with 
Cleveland's Plain Dealer, 
the six-term House member 
said he was quitting the race 
and would make a formal 
announcement on Friday 

"1 will be announcing 
that I'm transitioning out of 
the presidential campaign." 
Kucinich said. "I'm making 
that announcement tumor 
row about a new direction." 

Kucinich has received 
liillr support in his presi- 
dential bid; he got 1 per- 
cent of the vote in the New 
Hampshire primary and was 
shut out in the Iowa caucus- 
es. He did have a devoted 
following 
Kucinich. 61, is facing four 



challengers in the Demo- 
cratic congressional prima- 
ry March 4. and earlier this 
week he made an urgent ap 
peal on his Web site for funds 
for his re-election Rival Joe 
Cimperman has been criti- 
cal uf Kucinich for focusing 
too much time outside of his 
district while campaigning 
for president 

Kucinich brought the 
same sense of idealism to 
his second run for president 
as he did in his first bid. He 
said he was entering the 
race again because the Dem- 
ocratic Party wasn't pushing 
hard enough to end the Iraq 
war 

Once dubbed the "boy 
mayor" of Cleveland, he 
made an unpopular decision 
to refuse lo sell a public 
ly owned utility that pushed 
the city into default and 
drove him from office 

After the city's finan 
cial troubles, the mayor 
faced death threats, and «;is 



forced to wear a bulletproof 
vest when he threw out the 
first ball at a Cleveland Indi- 
ans game 

He barely survived a re- 
call vote. 

But he lost his bid for re- 
election as mayor of Cleve- 
land in 1978 lo Republi- 
can George Voinovich, who 
went on to become gover- 
nor and then US senator 
His life and his political ca- 
reer were derailed Kucinich 
spent more than a decade 
trying to get back into pol- 
itics - traveling around the 
country and then working 
as a teacher, consultant and 
television news reporter 

During his time in Con- 
gress Kucinich has been one 
of the most outspoken liber- 
als, opposing internation- 
al trade agreements like the 
North America Free Trade 
Agreement and march 
ing with protesters in Seat- 
tle during a meeting of the 
World Trade Organization 




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FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 9 



City manager of Greensburg 

to have seat of honor at 

State of the Union address 



Federal tax deal to provide faster rebates 
in hopes extra spending will revive economy 



THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

WASHINGTON - Kan 
«as will spend even more time 
in the national spotlight din- 
ing tin- president's State of 
the Union address on Mon 
day. 

Steve Hewitt, the city 
manager of Greensburg, Kan , 
has been invited to sit with 
first lady Laura Bush during 
the annual speech 

President Bush is expect 
ed to single out Hewitt and 
praise his environmentally 
friendly rebuilding efforts in 
the tornado-devastated city 

"It's an incredibly excil 
ing opportunity for him and 
for our town to be in the 
spotlight again, not for the 
tornado, but for what we're 
doing after with rebuilding," 
said Hewitt's assistant, Stacy 
Barnes. 

The prime lime billing 
for the small western Kan 
sas town follows word last 
week that Gov. Kathleen 
Sebelius was chosen to deliv- 
er the Democratic response 
to Bush's address from Ce- 
dar Crest, the governor's res 
idence in west Topeka 

Greensburg has won na- 
tional attention since officials 



voted last month to rebuild 
the town's city buildings us- 
ing the highest national envi- 
ronmental standards for con- 
struction. It is believed to be 
the first town in the country 
to set that goal 

The buildings will use re 
cycled building materials, al- 
ternative energy sources and 
fixtures to conserve water. 
While they cost more to con 
struct, the buildings general- 
ly are cheaper to operate and 
maintain 

Barnes said Hewitt was 
"shocked" last week when 
he received a series of phone 
calls from the White HOUM 
inviting him to attend the 
speech. He is planning to go 
with his wife In past years. 
about two dozen guests turn 
been invited to sit in the first 
lady's box above the House 
chamber. 

While Hewitt is in Wash- 
ington. Barnes said he plans 
to meet with Kansas' con 
gressional delegation and 
thank them for their help 
getting federal disaster aid 
for Greensburg He and his 
wife also are scheduled to see 
the White House and other 
prominent sights in the na- 
tion's Capitol 



THE ASSOCIATED PRESi 

WASHINGTON - With unprec- 
edented speed and cooperation. Con- 
gress and the White House forged a 
deal Thursday to begin rushing tax re- 
bates of $600 to $1,200 to most lax fil- 
ers by spring, hoping they will spend 
the money just as quickly and jolt the 
ailing economy to life 

Rebates would be even higher for 
families with children. 

The one-time tax rebates are at 
the center of a bard-won agreement to 
pump about Si 50 billion into the econ 
omy this year and perhaps stave off the 
first recession since 2001 

House Speaker Nancy IYIum. He 
publican leader fohn Boehner and 
Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson 
worked out the details in negotiations 
that stretched into Wednesday night at 
the Capitol 

About two thirds of the tax relief 
would go out in rebate checks to 1 17 
million families beginning in May Busi- 
nesses would get $50 billion in incen- 
tives to invest in new plants and equip 
men! 

Individual taxpayers would get up 
to $600 in rebates, working couples 
$1,200 and those with children an ad 
ditional $300 per child under the agree- 
ment. 

In a key concession to Democrats. 
35 million families who make at least 
$3,000 but don't pay taxes would gel 
$300 rebates. 

The rebates would phase out grad- 



ually for individuals whose adjusted 
gross income exceeds $75,000 and for 
couples with incomes above $150,000 
Contributions to IRA and 40 Ilk) re- 
tirement accounts and health savings 
accounts would not count toward the 
income limit 

"This package will lead to higher 
consumer spending and increased busi- 
ness investment," Bush said in bailing 
the agreement 

The bill will go straight to the 
House floor next week and on to the 
Senate, where some Democrats hope to 
add elements such as extending unem- 
ployment benefits for workers whose 
benefits have run out. 

Indeed, many Democrats, such as 
Ways and Means Committee Chair- 
man Charles Rangel, D-N.Y, and Ed- 
ward Kennedy of Massachusetts, the 
liberal lion of the Senate, were deeply 
unhappy that Pelosi agreed to jettison 
that proposal in late-stage talks, as well 
as plans to increase food stamp pay- 
ments. 

"1 do not understand, and cannot 
accept, the resistance of President Bush 
and Republican leaders to including an 
extension of unemployment benefits for 
those who are without work through 
no fault of their own." Rangel said. 

The administration signaled it's un- 
likely to welcome efforts to broaden the 
measure, and pressure was mounting 
in the Senate lo accept the hard-won 
deal. 

' The American people are not go- 
ing to have a lot of patience for taking 



time," Paulson said 

If the Senate gives quick approv- 
al, the first rebate payments could be- 
gin going out in May and most people 
could have them by Inly, he said 

It has become increasingly clear 
that the economy is teetering on the 
edge of recession, if it hasn't already 
gone over that line 

The crisis in subprime home loans 
has hit hard at many lending institu- 
tions, cramping credit for almost every- 
one else 

Economic growth has all but dis- 
appeared, companies are reporting big 
losses and Wall Street had been tum- 
bling day after day - even after emer- 
gency Federal Reserve rate-cutting - 
until Wednesday's hopeful talk about 
the stimulus deal. 

The Dow (ones industrial average 
was up more than 100 points Thursday 
after soaring nearly 300 the day before 

In addition to concerns openly 
expressed by lawmakers, members of 
Congress are not eager to run for re- 
election this fall with voters fearful of 
losing jobs in a recession. 

For businesses, the stimulus mea- 
sure would allow them to immediate 
tax write-offs for 50 percent of the pur- 
chase price of plants and other capital 
equipment and permit small business- 
es to write off additional purchases of 
equipment. 

A provision to allow businesses suf- 
fering losses now lo reclaim taxes pre- 
viously paid was dropped in end stage 
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THE EDGE 



PAGE 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 




Tattoos revolve around personal significance for local students, residents 



6y Hannah Blick 
KANSAS MAli COLLEGIAN 

Her forearms are riddled with 
the marked scars of a past addic- 
tion But on her right wrist, a dif- 
ferent kind of permanent mark 
catches your eye. It's a tattoo. 

Shannon "Ducky" Beck- 
er said she started getting tattoos 
alter she had struggled with cut- 
ting - a form of self- mutilation 
- and finds it to be a therapeutic 
form of expression 

"They're much better than the 
ugly scars. I get to express myself 
in a personal and beautiful way,'' 
she said. 

Becker. Fort Riley resident, 
said she now has 14 tattoos, in 
eluding her newest, which she had 
done Wednesday Her new tattoo 
forms a ring on her upper right 
leg with her tour sons* names and 
their kanji characters - Chinese 
symbols that represent different 
animals, Becker said. She said she 
chose to include the kanji charac- 
ters because they describe the an i 
mat-like qualities of her sons. 

"1 think all people act like an- 
imals," she said "And I have four 
boys, and I'm the only female 
around - means I get to see that a 
lot" 

Becker said the rest of her tat- 
toos have personal meaning to her 
in different ways 

"This [lattoo] says 'In Vino 
Veritas,' which means truth in 
wine,'" she said, pointing to a large 
heart intertwined wilh thorny vines 
on her upper- left shoulder "In 



other words, you do things when 
you're drunk that you wouldn't 
normally do sober 

"Most of my bad experienc 
es had involved men and alcohol. 
Maybe that's why I don't drink 
anymore." 

Though Becker's tattoos have 
meaning for her, not all people's 
tattoos are as sentimental Jason 
England, a tattoo artist at Twist- 
ed Apple Tattoo in Aggieville (for- 
merly Fine Line Tattoo) said just 
because a lattoo does not have 
deep meaning behind it, does not 
mean it's not worthwhile. 

"As long as you don't ever get 
tired of looking at it and it's aes- 
thetically pleasing to you. (hen 
you don't need lo worry about 
the meaning," he said "A tattoo 
doesn't always have to have deep, 
profound meaning." 

OTHER SIDE OF THE NEEDLE 

Chris Tassin, the new owner 
of Twisted Apple Tattoo, said she 
has been tattooing for almost 13 
years and has seen a wide range 
of tattoo requests, from those with 
deep, sentimental value lo some 
that are more spur of the mo- 
ment 

"You'd be surprised how many 
people walk in the door and say 
'What's the cheapest tattoo you've 
got'' That's not the best idea," she 
said "Then, when we try to talk 
them into putting more thought 
into it, they get mad al us People 
think it's a fad - its not" 

Tassin said Twisted Applet 
policy is they will not tattoo mi- 




Photo illustration by Joilyn Brown 

Chris Tassin, owner of Twisted Apple Tattoo, tattoos a New Zealand tribal 
symbol on Fort Riley resident M*r*t Catdaburg't back. Tassin has been a 
lattoo artist for almost 1 3 years and recently purchased and renamed the 
Aggieville tattoo parlor. 



nors because too many people 
who get tattoos at a young age re- 
gret their decision later. 

"It will affect your job oppor- 
tunities - a lot of girls worry about 
if it'll show in their wedding dress." 
she said "It's stuff like that you 
have to consider" 

As she concentrated on oul 
lining a tattoo on a customer, she 
also said she enjoys hearing her 
clients' stories and the meaning 
behind their tattoos, though some 
people take it a little too far 

"We hear lots of sob stories 
in here." Tassin said "Sometimes 
1 don't mind it. but sometimes 



it's a little more than we need to 
know" 

England joked across the 
room with her, saying: "They think 
we're psychiatrists" 

THINKING IT THROUGH 

Jamie Macke said she has nev- 
er regretted getting her tattoos 

Macke. senior in English liter- 
ature, said she got her first tattoo 
when she was 18 She said her dad 
told her that tattoos on a woman's 
shoulders were unattractive - SO 
that's exactly where she put one 

SMlNKEDPtgtll 




CLOVERFIELD AN EXCITING ADDITION TO 
HORROR GENRE, THOUGH ENDS UNRESOLVED 



d net ion values are high- 
quality, though the $25 mil- 
lion budget lands well be- 
low most monster movies 

The handheld cinema- 
tography works well for the 
most part, but the shaky 
camera work will get an- 
noying for anyone with mo 
tion sickness 

Unlike "Godzilla," 

"Cloverfield" focuses on its 
characters ralher than re- 
lying on special effects to 
keep the audience enter- 
tained 

By keeping the story 
simple and the pacing fast. 
director Matt Reeves keeps 
the audience's attention 
throughout the brisk 85 
minute movie 

The film will disappoint 
some horror fans wilh its 
lack of exposition 

We never find out what 
the monster is or where it 
came from, though a quick 
online search will provide 
several interesting theories 

As a horror movie, 
"Cloverfield" is as well-ex- 
ecuted and fun lo watch as 
anything else in the genre. 

K might disappoint hor- 
ror fans looking for an epic 
monster story, but everyone 
else should be entertained. 



"Cloverfield" 

***** 

rWvtaw by 8(t ndan Pratgtt 

"Cloverfield," one of the 
first big releases of 2008. 
is an excellent example of 
a film excelling within its 
genre 

The film is present 
ed as a home video recov- 
ered by the government in 
the area formerly known as 
Central Park It fallows a 
group of friends attempting 
to survive after a large crea- 
ture lays siege to New York 
City 

Most critics have de- 
scribed it as a mix of "Godz- 
illa" and "The Blair Witch 
Project," and it succeeds 
by landing somewhere in 
between. The pro 




MOVIE REVIEW 

HEIGL, MARSDEN PROVIDE ONSCREEN CHARM, 
CLICHE HUMOR IN WEDDING FILM '27 DRESSES' 



ful but lacking in compassion, 
doesn't see her sister's anguish 
as she forces her to help with 
endless wedding plans 

Meanwhile. Jane meets 
Kevin, played by lames Mars- 
den, a bemused, sarcastic wed- 
ding guest who - surprise - 
turns out to be the author of 
lane's favorite wedding arti- 
cles 

"27 Dresses" is formulaic 
and predictable, and the movie 
also lacks originality and wit 
The script seems cliche with 
lines like, "You'd rather focus 
on other people's Kodak mo- 
ments than make one of your 
own" 

Director Anne Fletcher, a 
former movie choreographer 
whose lone directing credit be- 
fore "27 Dresses" was 2006s 
dance-heavy "Step Up," fails 
to make the movie stand oul 
among the dozens of recent 
romantic comedies centered 
around nuptials The movie's 
leading lady is its only saving 
grace. Heigl is funny, self dep 
recating and likable, even dur- 
ing her less virtuous moments 

She and the blue-eyed 
Marsden pair well on screen as 
they realize their attraction to 
each other and deal wilh their 
respective relationship bag- 
gage. 

Though Marsden *s film 



"27 Dresses" 
***** 

Review by Megan MoMt 

Devotees of wedding 
comedies will love ihe newest 
addition to the genre, but oth- 
ers might be less enthused. 

The addition. "27 Dress- 
es," takes its inspiration from 
the adage "always a brides- 
maid, never a bride" as Jane, 
played by Katherine Heigl of 
"Grey's Anatomy," endures 27 
trips down the aisle as a brides- 
maid, never having found a 
groom for herself 

Jane is in love with her 
boss, played by Edward Bums, 
who of course treats his ever- 
assistant like a faithful puppy. 

The situation is exacer- 
bated when Jane's sister, Tess, 
played by Malin Akerman, be 
comes engaged to lane's boss/ 
crush less, who is beauti- 



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career spans about 15 years 
and includes such hits as the 
"X-Men" series and "The 
Notebook, 1 ' his stock has risen 
of late wilh roles in "Enchant- 
ed" and "Superman Returns." 
He makes a worthy partner for 
Heigl, and their chemistry is 
playful and sweet. 

Overall, what you see is 
what you get with "27 Dress 
es" It uses no revolutionary 
plot devices or cinematic tech- 
niques, but ii will be more than 
satisfactory for someone look- 
ing lo watch the next "My Best 
Friend's Wedding" 




ADRIANNE 
OEWEESE 



JUST A NOTE 

Music class 

benefits 

young 

students 



Shiny brass and wood 
instruments stood on dis- 
play Their extrinsic keys and 
mouthpiec- 
es waited for 
eager 10- and 
1 1 year-olds 
lo hold them 
and breathe 
life into them 

The first 
notes sound- 
ed atrocious 
and pierc- 
ing. But these 
students and 
their teachers 

paid little attention. They came 
to make music 

Fifth grade often is a be- 
falling time in children's lives 
because band class starts and 
the chance to leam an instru- 
ment eels just like the first time 
they picked up a basketball 

During the last de- 
cade, music programs in pub- 
lic schools have declined. The 
Music for All Foundation pro 
duced "The Sound of Silence 

- The Unprecedented Decline 
in Music Education in Califor- 
nia Public Schools" with data 
from the California Depart- 
ment of Education. The study, 
released in September 2004, re- 
vealed that 50 percent fewer 
students enrolled in music pro- 
grams in 2003-04 than in 1999- 

2000 : 

New York Mayor Michael, 
Bloomberg announced in sum- 
mer 2007 that New York City 
schools would be required to 
teach the arts, which includes 
music, according tu a Dec 25, 
2007, article in the New York 
Times. To put some teeth in the 
initiative, Bloomberg said prin- 
cipals would be rated annually 
on their successes with leach- 
ing the arts, just as they are 
with other academic subjects ! 

Music means mure than 
just another required subject 
for students. For some, it's a 
golden opportunity and a life- 
line. Not every child is a young 
Einstein in math and science or 
a star on the soccer field. But 
music - a universal language 

- lives in some children and 
waits for that moment, late in 
elementary school, when they 
can choose their sound. 

Research in recent decade* 
has shown that music stud- 
ies can help improve IQ and 
SAT scores With standardized 
testing aside, making music is 
about basic human wants and 
desires; music lells stories that 
we often cannol tell one anoth- 
er in words. 

"The arts are basic Mu- 
sic should be an essential sub- 
ject of every person's life," Paul 
Stewart said in "The True In- 
trinsic Value of Music Study" 
an article in the April-May 
2007 "American Music Teach- 
er." 

"The basic, intrinsic val- 
ue of music study comes shin 
ing through during every en- 
semble rehearsal, every group 
lesson, every pnvate music les- 
son, every practice session and 
in every performance venue 
throughout the world" 

Many of us probably do 
not play the instruments we 
played during our elementary 
years Instruments, sheet music 
and music stands sitting at Ihe 
back of our closets should be 
donated to schools so another 
child can have Ihe opportunity 
we once anticipated 

Organizations like VHl's 
Save the Music Foundation 
also are dedicated to serve el 
ementary school children of 
all backgrounds and abilities. 
Since its start in 1997, Save the 
Music has donated about $40 
million worth of musical instru- 
ments to 1,500 public schools . 
and improved ihe lives of more 
than 1 million children. 

The game shot or prize- 
winning science fair project for 
some students happens the first 
time they put on a crisp white ' 
shirt and black pants. They sit ■ 
up straight, take a brealh, look: 
up lo their conductors and : 
blow oul a note in unison with 
their peers 



Mrianrw Date** fctwMi print 
jounufcm mm) CNMaV 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MfiMt 



INKED | Students advise putting thought, time into decision to get tattoo 



Continued from Pag* 1 

"1 was young and rebel- 
lious," she said "I just wanted 
to make my dad mad And he 
was" 

But Macke had more rea- 
son for tattooing herself than 
just angering her father The 
tattoo - a sacred heart on her 
left shoulder - was inspired 
by the 1996 movie "Romeo + 
|uliet" in which John Leguiza 
mo's character Tybalt Capulet 
sports the traditionally- Cath- 



ueii'iittt/' Oiijlitf $':r*ite 

Beginning January 2$th, 
m will close at 7 p.m. 

£laflin Sooki and fopics 



oiic image. 

*l thought of that movie 
as like the Shakespeare story 
of our generation - and I've 
always loved literature and 
reading, and I thought that 
would be something I would 
always love," Macke said 
"Plus. I love the religious as- 
pect of it" 

Since then, Macke, now 
31. has gotten four more tat- 
toos - all with personal mean- 
ing Her most recent is a lo- 
tus flower on the back of her 



neck. Macke said to her, the 
lotus symbolizes overcoming 
obstacles in life. 

For a lot of people, t 
think it's more about getting 
the tattoo For me, it's much 
more about the having of the 
tattoo," she said. 

Chad Miller, sophomore 
in electrical engineering, said 
he also understands the im- 
portance of thinking through 
the decision to get a tattoo 

"You're nervous because 
you're not sure if it will hurt 



or if you will like it. but at the 
same time you're really ex 
cited because you're getting 
something that you've maybe 
always wanted." Miller said 

He also said if someone 
is considering getting a tattoo, 
it's important to consider all 
angles of the decision. 

"Make sure you're getting 
something you'll like forever," 
he said "Also, find a tattoo 
artist that you're comfortable 
with" 

Miller has one tattoo - 



a Korean character meaning 
respect" - but he said it is 
one he put thought into and 
has significance for him. 

"The word respect means 
a lol to me since I've been do 
ing martial arts for most of my 
life." he said. "And I chose to 
use a Korean character be- 
cause most of my martial arts 
are Korean." 

Becker also said she feels 
confident in her decision to 
show off her tattoos. 

"A lot of people say that 



I'm a 'walking billboard.' but 
I don't see it as Unit , Hcckcr 
said "1 see it as self- ex pre* 
sion 

"Tattoos are also a way to 
open up to people Like when 
you smile at someone, they 
will usually smile back. * In- 
said "When they sec your (at 
toos and ask you about it, you 
gel the chance lo share what il 
means to you, to share a port 
of yourself. And when you 
open up lo people, thai opens 
them up toolhers, tM 




D-tods 



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BAR & GRILL 






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I 

The Royal Purple yearbook is available in Kedzie 103 or call 532-6555. 



PAGE 12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 



TEXT | Messaging 
system to have backup 



Continued From Pag* 1 

messaging system might be 
convenient to students, Raw- 
son said it is important (or 
people to view the system 
as just an additional way to 
communicate 

"We recognize the pos- 
itives and negatives of this," 
he said. "We recognize the 
growth in cell phone usage. 
On the other hand, if people 
are in a movie or in class they 
might not have their phone 
on. 

In fact, the university will 
not rely on this method sole- 
ly, he said The university has 
several emergency notifica- 
tions in place including a re- 



verse 911 telephone call sys- 
tem, where a 30-second re- 
corded message from the K 
State police wilt be sent out 
to all students, staff and fac- 
ulty; a Web page override, in 
which all Web pages at www. 
ksu.edu will be directed lo an 
emergency information page; 
e-mail advisory; campus car- 
illon, in which the Anderson 
Hall lower will be used u a 
public address system, and 
other methods, he said 

" During the ice storm we 
relied on local media and the 
K State Web page and web 
mail to get news out. If we 
would have had it in place it 
would have been helpful," he 
said. 



U current studenfe, fatuity and 
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CARNIVAL | Annual 
Expo featured in Union 



Connnutd from Paget 

for the Union Program 
Council, said, "My freshman 
year I wenl to the |Expuj. and 
that led me to the organizations 
that I am involved in now." 

The Expo provided ac- 
tivities for students like mak 
ing their own hot chocolate, 
s' mores and snowflake picture 
frames Campbell said these ac- 
tivities were in conjunction to 
the theme of Ihe evening. 
"Our theme is Warm up to a 
new semester?* Campbell mU 

The event also featured 
swing dancers from Ihe K- State 
Swing and Salsa Club. 
Most of the organizations that 



had information booths set up 
in the Union gave away can- 
dy and take-home souvenirs 
like pens and keychains to at- 
tract students lo their tables. 
The purpose is to talk lo the 
students about the organiza- 
tion and send them home with 
pamphlets and papers with 
more information that might 
have not come across in the 
conversation at the organiza- 
tion's table 

"This | Expo] has helped 
me to see organizations that I 
can get involved in," Lambert 
said if I only join one orga- 
nization, I will be involved on 
campus and possible join other 
organizations." 




Photos by Win Castro | COLLEGIAN 
Wines, spirits and other alcoholic beverages might be sold in grocery stores because of a bill proposed by Hy-Vee grocery stores. Below: 
The Library, located at the corner of 1 2th & Laramie, is a local liquor store that serves the Manhattan community. 




CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 



l 1 ! 1 



•ii ■■■ 



ii ii 



■ ■ 1 1 1 1 
: ■ I ■ ■ i 



LET'S RENT 



Rem- Apt Unfurnished Rent Apt Unfurnished 



AUGUST PRELEASEING 
serve! units close to KSU 
Some only one yew oM 
A> apkances including 
washer/ dryef energy etti- 
oent apartments ott-streel 
parting call (or location/ 
pftM 7B6-778-I102 

www wilksapta. corn 

ONE TWO. and three 
bedroom apartments ex- 
cedent condition Next lo 
K- State and Aggieville re** 
tonebie rate* private 
panting attentive land- 
lord, no pete. June and 
August leases TNT 
Rentals 785-539-5508 



ONE, TWO. and three- 
bedraom apartments new 
construction next to K- 
Stata and AggievWe up- 
scale newer apartments 
washen dryer. dish- 
washer, central air. pri- 
vate parking, security light- 
ing, no pets June and Au- 
gust leases TNT Rental* 
785-539-5508 



Advertise 
Advertise 
Advertise 




Bulletin Board I Housing Real Estate 




LEARN TO FLY' K-StatB 
Flying Club has live an 
planes and lowest rates 
Gall 785-776-17*4, www- 

ksu.edu/fcsic 




LOST KEYS Three Press 
and one Volvo car Key 
Reward fltzoff9ksu.edu 
or 630-605-93O4 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4114 assure* ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity In housing writ* 
out distinction on ac- 
count of race, sex tamll- 
lal status, military sta- 
tus, disability, ratjglpn, 
age, color, national ori- 
gin or ancestry Viola- 
tions should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resource* at 
City Hall, 785-587-2440 

EXCELLENT ONE-BED 
ROOM June 1. (600 in 
eludes wisher' dryer, stor- 
age, parking, uttMes In- 
ternet, cable utnefreyt) 
cox net or 785-341 -4275 



I) 

Rent-Houses 



FOUR. FIVE, ux, seven, 
and e.ghl-bedroom 

house s excellent condi- 
tion next to K-Siate and 
Aggieville Multiple 

kitchens and bathrooms 
washer/ dryer. disr 
washer, central air rea- 
sonable rates, no pats 
June and August isases 
TNT Rentals 785.539. 

0549 

NEW HOUSE, lour bed 
room, two bathroom, 
dose to campus avail 
able August 1 si 1614 
Pierre 785 -304-0387 

RTWH REMODELED 

tliree-twdroom, on* bath' 
room, large garage 1401 
Yuma 7S5- 



Rent Houi& 



Rent Apt Unfurnished Rent-Apt Unfurnished 



MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 assure* ev- 
ery person equel oppor- 
tunity in housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count of race, sex. famil- 
ial status, military sta- 
tus, disability religion. 
age, color, national ori- 
gin or ancestry Viola- 
tions should be re- 
ported 10 the Director of 
Human Resource* at 
City Hall. 785-587-1440 



APPLY ONLINE! On* to 
tour-bedroom apartments, 
studios and lohs available 
January or August 2008 
Visit us at housing k- state - 
sou or cal 785-532-3790 
to set up a lour 




NEXT TO campus. Avail- 
able now June end Au- 
gust One. two, three 
tour, live six, and nine- 
badroorns Apartments, 
houses and multiplexes 
No pets 785-S37-70M. 

NICE BRtTTNAY Ridge 
Townhome tour -bed- 

room two ana 1/2 bath. 
all appliances washer' 
dryer. August 1 No pets. 
$980' month 765-293- 
5197 

THREE, FOUR, and ftve- 
bedrooms Oldnl gel the 
house you wanted MM 
year? The good ones go 
last. Call 785-34 1-OCM 



ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartments in new build- 
ings Close to campus 
and Aggieville Available 
June and August 2008 
No pets Can John at 785- 
313-7473 

THREE-BEDROOM 

JUNE/ August leases 
One bloc* to campus/ Ag- 
gieviiie Central sir. lull 
kitchens, washer/ dryer on 
site 785-539-1 mi 

TWO- BEDROOM TWO 
bathroom spa rim em two 
Mocks tram cam- 
pus 1 Very nice new con- 
struction Inexpensive util- 
ities Will leas* quickly 1 
Sorry, no pets Contact 
Amber al 785-313-1807 
or a rachae®gmall com 



NOW LEASING 
FOR FALL 



BRAND NEW luxury apart- 
ments close to campus 
Granite countsrtops. stain- 
less appkances, washer/ 
dryer pool, hot tub. gym. 
business center theater 
785-537-2098 collogtet- 

... . - ir 

NEWER 1844 Anderson 
three-bedroom two bath- 
room, personal washer/ 
dryer one- half block wast 
of KSU available August 
1st $960/ month 785- 
410-1885 

NEWLY REMODELED 
913 and 917 Vaftier, two 
bedroom, one bathroom, 
personal washer' dryer. 
Three blocks east ol KSU 
available June and Au- 
gust $820/ month. 785- 
410-1886 



irRe 2 Bedrnmi Aot< 

Sand 
Perjrjiebrook 



Open Saturday 103 

537-9064 

i.tiiliinyestandreniai com 




Need a 
roommate? 



785-532-6555 



Spacious 
Duplexes 



to 1 



Each duplex features 

walk-in closets, 

all kitchen appliances. 

wisher/dryer, 

oft street parking, 

phone and cable 

connections 11 every room, 

security lighting. 

(rash and lawn care 

Security deposrtrs the same 
si one month's rent 

One Year Least period 
begins August 1st 

4 Stylet 

4 Bedrooms. 2 Baths 
2,600 Sq Fi 

Mon do Ctindo 
2 Living Rooms, Walk out 
upper deck. Largt study 
office. Structured cabla. 
Spacious liundry room 
0NlY$1,55fl/mo 

4 Bad rooms, 2 Baths 
1.800 So Ft 

HanendH 

2 Living Rooms. Spacious 

laundry room 

ONLY J1.2Wmo 

4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths 

1.600 Sq Ft 

2 Levels Study oflice 

ONLY ft. ISO/ma 

4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths 

1,300 Sq Ft 

ONlYtl.lSO/mD 

Sorry, We *tff*l 

Oi*MaM|*>w*w4 



Ctea* to f i fm . 
Omy. 313-47*1 
MtoMl HMMi 



H * ; V*1 1 ., I H 1 J-; 



AVAILABLE JUNE and 1998 OAKWOOD three- ROOMMATE NEEDEO 
August Two, three, lour, bedroom, two-bath, walk- Nice, spacious three -bed- 
live, and six-bedrooms in closets, garden tub, room house $350/ month 
Close to campus No pets shed. Located in Walnut plus bills. Available imme 
washer/ dryer 785-317. Grove 18.000 or best ol- diately Call 820-654-7696 
5026 ler 0*11765-317-4689 



AVAILABLE NEXT school 
year. Three to eight-bed- 
room houses. All have lull 
kitchen, washer/ dryer, 
central an Call now tor 
best selection wwwfore- 
mostproperty com 785- 
539-4641 

HOUSES MANY sues 
and prices. June or Au- 
gust 765-341-0686 

LARGE FOUR-BED- 

ROOM two bathroom, 
carpeted rec room. Near 
Aggieville,' campus, cen- 
Iral sir. washer/ dryer, dis- 
posal, fireplace 
Available 

terms negotiable 785-317 
5466 



FOR SALE 1995 Liberty 
mobile home 16x78 two 
bedroom, two bath with 
shed $15,000 765-494 
8464 Five miles east of 
Manhattan In nice park 

FOR SALE: Beautiful two- 
bedroom, one bath. 14x 
65 mobile home, two car 
carport, partially fur- 
nished, garden tub, all ap 
piance*. large shad and 
deck, Possible owner fi- 
nancing. $10,500 Walnut 
Grove (766)- 585-2483 




ONE, TWO, 
four-bedroom house* 
Close 10 campus/ ajeo 



mediately No peta 786- 
539-1975 or 765-313- 



ONE, TWO, three, tour, 
live, and six-bedroom 
apartments and houses 
available tot June and Au- 
gust 765-5394295 




ATTENTION PARENTS/ 
investors several invest 
ment properties for sale 
near campus, AH proper 
tie* era turn key with good 
rental history. Doug 785- 
313-5573 or email dkrae- 
maraHsuedu 



•COMPLETE LIST of 
houses close to campus 
for sale larryllmbock- 
erOreeceandnichols com 
765317-7713 Comer- 
alone Really 



> \2- 

( > > > 



ROOMMATE WANTED 
as soon as possible! One 
block from campus! You 
will have your own bed- 
room and own full bath- 
room' With washer/ dryer, 
dishwasher, and fireplace 
Water and Irash paid tor! 
tl interested call Cami a I 
78S-747-6742 or email 
me c2|is)ksu edu 

THREE FEMALE interna- 
tional graduate students 
looking for roommate at 
University Crossing www 
ucmanhattan com Call 
712-281-7977 or e-mail 
ruppmelissadgmail com. 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted as soon as possi- 
ble $300 per month plus 
haft utiktles Own room 
and parking Please call 
318-204-7208 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
warned to share house 
wfth female and male. 
$300/ month Utatas 
paid Call 765-537-4947 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to hva wffri two 
Clean Inendly glds Spa- 
Clous three-bedroom 
house Includes washer/ 
dryer, dishwasher, and 
garage Close to the sla- 
dlum $366J month 785- 
477-1135 

LOOKING FOR female 
grad student to share 
three bedroom two bath- 
room houae. $350 Lease 
amove-In date flexible E - 
maM atataanakau edu . 

MALE ROOMMATE 

warned House three 
btoeks from campus 
$3S5.0O plus one-fourth of 
UfJWss. Ca* 620-228- 
1345. 

ROOM FOR Rent Univer- 
sity Gardens Two-bed 
room/ two bath Share 
w«h male grad student 
Rent is $260 plus utilities 
Contact me at marychnsti- 
nesandner® yahoo com 
or 913-620-0679 




FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed Four-bedroom, 
two bath apartment. $310 
plus ullfllea very close to 
campus 1 Available now - 
January rent I roe Call 
Katie 316-644-0266 

ONE BEDROOM IN two- 
bedroom house Great 
roommate February 1- 
June 1 $385 per month 
includes all utiktles eicepi 
internet/ cable Close to 
campu! i-im: nego- 

tiable 765-427 6636. 

SUBLEASER NEEDED in 
a two-bedroom apart - 
meni Includes washer/ 
dryer, water and Irash 
paid $315/ month plus 
utilities Call 785-820- 
0512 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
through May or July with 
option to renew for follow- 
ing year! Three-bedroom 
house with private room, 
washer/ dryer, wireless In- 
ternet, digital cable with 
OVR $275 rent plus ulik- 
■e* Dn average ($50) ca 
We and Internet Included 
Move in Today! 719-432 
7015 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 

785-532-6555 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 13 




Emptoynient/ C areers 




THE COLLEGIAN csnnol 
vartly tha financial po- 
tential ol sdvartlsa- 
meiit* In tha Employ 
manl/ Carsw classifies* 
tlon Raadati ara ad- 
vued lo approach any 
such business opportu- 
nity with rssaonabt* cau- 
tion Ttie Collegian 
urge* our reader* to 
contact the Better Busi- 
ness Bureau, 501 SE Jef- 
ferson, Topafca. KS 
66607-1190 785-232- 

04H 

ft WELL sstabtlsried. pro- 
fssstonal landscaping 

company la seeking a reli- 
able individual tor lull -lime 
employttieni In their land- 
scape installation division 
Prior landscape or firm 
experience preferred 

Above average wages 
commensurate with a (pe- 
nance and ability Benefits 
include major medical 
paid leave and (01 k Ap- 
ply in person at 11524 
Landscape Ln ... SI 
George KS 66535 785 
494 2*18 or 785-776- 
0397 

ACCOUNTANT/ CFO; 

Due 10 our continued 
growth, CIvlcPlus, the na- 
tion's leading provider ol 
City. County, and School 
websites, has an opening 
for a full-time accountant 
This career position re- 
quires the ability to handle 
multiple tasks and priori- 
ties what maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Accounting experi- 
ence Is required, 
Peachtree experience pre 
(erred Competitive pay 
plus benefits Including 
Hearth. Dental. Paid Holi- 
days. Paid vacation and 
40 IK. Email resume m Ml- 
crosofl Word or Text for- 
mat to; 

jobsgdvicplus corn. 
ACCOUNTING CLERK 
pan time with USD 363 
Business Office $7 00 per 
Hour. Twenty hours par 
weak during school year, 
lull-time summer hours 
High school graduate or 
equivalent , computer 

skills including experience 
NRj! Lxcel. working knowl- 
edge of office procedures 
and equipment, basic ac- 
"ig skills. Job de- 
scription available Appli- 
cations accepted until po- 
sition is filled Apply to 
Manhattan-Ogden USD 
383. 2031 Poynti Ave . 
Manhattan. KS 66502 
785-587-2000 Equal Op- 
portunity Employer 

APPOINTMENT SET- 
TER: CivicPlua is the na- 
tions leading provider ol 
Crly, County and School 
websites We have full 
and pari -lime positions In 
Manhattan with significant 
income poieniiai for the 
right individual This posi- 
tion involves calling poten- 
tial clients to setup webi- 
nar appointments Pay is 
$10' hour plus $40 for 
each webinar appoinl 
mum you setup Full-time 
benefits include Health, 
Dental. Paid Holidays, 
Paid Vacation and 401 K 
matching Email resume 
in Microsoft Woro of Text 
format to 
tobsttclvicplus com. 

ASSISTANT TENNIS 

COACH, risen Irmat Mid. 



Spnng reason Accepting 
resumes or letters with 
qualifications until position 
is tilled Apply 10 Manhat- 
tan Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poyntz Ave. Manhat- 
tan KS 66502 785-587 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

BARTENDING 1 S300 A 
day potential No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 1-800-965- 
6520 exl 144 
BILLING COORDINA- 
TOR: Due to our 
ued growth CivtcPlus, ihe 
nations leading provider 
of City. County, and 
School websites, has an 
opening tor a tutl-iime 
Billing Coordinator. This 
exciting opportunity re- 
quires the ability to handle 
multiple tasks and priori- 
ties while maintaining a 
pos.tive and energetic atti- 
tude Competitive pay 
plus benefits including 
He ail h Denial, Paid Holi 
days, Paid Vacation and 
401 K Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or Text for- 
mat lo 
jObstfcMepluB com 

CHIPOTLE- WOflK at a 
place where you actually 
want (o eai the food' 
Chtpotle is now hiring all 
positions Free tad 
We hours Apply 1 pm lo 
r> urn. Monday through 
Friday 785 587 8029 



COMPUTER PROGRAM 
MERS wanted for posi- 
tions in the Knowledge 
Discovery In Databases 
Research group at K- 
State Applicants should 
be responsible, diligent 
and creative, and should 
be familiar with Cf or 
Java, of have the aMrty to 
leam Pay la commensu- 
rate with experience, at 
grades are encouraged to 
apply Call 785-34 11 599 
or send resume lo bhau$ 
eis.Ksu.edu. 

DAVCARE NEEDED for 
two girls. 4 years and 8 
monihs ol age. Couple 
hours a day and some 
evenings please have ref- 
erences Contact Amy at 
785-410-5716 or e-mail 
me al amy-plesltBcOx- 
nel 

EARN $800 $3200 a 
menth to drive brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
them www AdCarCk* - 
com 

FULL-HMc AND part 
time Porter needed Must 
have valid dnver's kcense 
and dean driving record 
See Eddie at Schram 
Chrysler Dodge 3100 An- 
derson 

FULL-TIME CLERK posi- 
tions available Motorcy- 
cling background a plus 
Win train Apply in parson 
at Brooks Yamaha. 8070 
East Highway 24. Manhat 
tan KS 

FULL-TIME SUMMER in- 
ternship Open tp all ma- 
jors, gain career skills, re- 
sume experience Aver 
age earns $700/ week 
For details call 785-317 
0455 

GRAPHIC DESIGN: Ctvic- 
Plus, a Manhattan based 
company and the leader 
in government webstles, 
is seeking full-time and 
contract graphic design- 
ers Ho HTML experience 
is necessary but must be 
proficient in Phofoshop 
An understanding of 
Flash. Adobe Illustrator, 
and Microsoft Word is 
helpful but not required 
Must be able to manage 
multiple projects simulta- 
neously in a fast -paced 
environment. Fun-lime 
benefits include health, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 Ik) 
matching. Email resume 
and design samples to 
jobs •cjvlcphis.com. 

GREAT JOB for Out- 

doorsy Peoplel Kaw Val- 
ley Greenhouses is look- 
ing for help this growing 
season We are interested 
in part or full-time sched- 
ules lor the second 
semester. For more Infor- 
mation contact human re- 
sources at kvgemploymen- 
t@yahoo.com or 785-776- 
8585 To apply In person 
go lo 360 Zeandale Rd 
Manhattan, Monday- Fri- 
day 8a.m.- 4p.m. 

HEAD TENNIS COACH. 
Eisenhower Middle 

School Salary sal by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spnng season Accepting 
resumes or letters with 
quallticaijons until position 
is filled Apply to Manhat- 
tan-Ogden USD 383. 
203 1 Poynu Ave. Manhat- 
tan KS 66502 785-587- 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

HELP WANTED: KSU 
BEEF CATTLE RE- 
SEARCH CENTER 
CONTACT Garrett al 
gparsons9ksu.edu or 
765-539-4971 

HIRING WAITSTAFF tar 
KatHouse Lounge Apply 
in person after 4pm al 
till Moro Manhattan KS 

HOME CHILDCARE 

wanted lor 2, 5 and 7 year 
old Drivable and reliable 
car needed. References 
required Contact Lindsey 
at 7B5-317-J140 or 
Iknu(se79«.'gmail com for 
more inlormation 

HORTICULTURAL SER- 
VICES Garden Center is 
seeking reliable, moti- 
vated individuals lor full- 
time and pan-time eta- 
son al positions in our re- 
tail store Above average 
wages commensurate 

with experience and abili- 
ties. Apply in person al 
11524 Landscape Ln , St 
George KS 66535 785- 
494-2418 or 785-776- 
0397 



K-STATE LIBRARIES has 
two openings for work 
from 8- noon in the mall 
room al Hale Library 
Heavy lifting required To 
apply go to www lib ksu - 
adu Affirmative Action/ 
Equal Opportunity Em 
pkjyei 

LABORERS NEEDED 
Howe Landscape Inc is 
currently seeking laborers 
for our landscape. Irriga- 
tion, and mowing/ marls- 
nance divisions Appli- 
cants must be 18 years of 
age. have a valid drivers li- 
cense and pass a pre-em- 
ployment drug test We 
can work with class sched< 
ulea but prater 4- hout 
blocks of tune Starting 
wages are $6 00' hour 
Apply three ways, in per- 
son Monday- Friday al 
12780 Madison Road in 
Riley, call 785-776-1697 
to obtain an application; 
or e-mail us at askhow***- 
landscapw pom. 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 
and Landscape Foreman 
needed Competitive pay 
and benefits Please con- 
tact Alhan's Services In- 
c ol Topeka. KS 785-232- 
1 568 or www athansser- 
v ices com 

LAW FIRM is seeking an 
office assistant/ runner - 
pan -time, flexible hours 
available Please submit 
resume to Human Re- 
sources, 555 Poynti Ave. 
Sta 240. Manhattan. 

Kansas, 66502 

MAINTENANCE 
WORKER I (Horticul- 
ture) Starling Salary: 
$1222/ hour (full-time) 
Position Purpose: As- 
sists the Horticulture sec- 
tion in meeting its objec- 
tives by providing labor. 
operating machinery, and 
venous divisional equip- 
ment Assists Horttcultur- 
ist in routine landscape 
Maintenance required lo 
provide high qualify munic- 
ipal grounds, tacilines, ser- 
vices and experiences lo 
park patrons Experience 
Required; Knowledge of 
types and uses of com- 
mon hand loots . Bealc 
skills in irrigation, pruning, 
planting, and pest control 
are valuable assets, along 
with a general understand- 
ing of turf and landscape 
maintenance practices 
Willingness and ability to 
perform heavy manual la- 
bor Tor extended periods 
of time, work outdoors In 
aH weather and perform 
routine repetitive tasks es- 
sential Applicants should 
possess mathematical 
skills, oral communication, 
writing, and reading skills 
lo complete basic reports, 
read plans and directions, 
and communicate with oth- 
ers Special Require- 
ments: Musi have and 
maintain valid drivers li- 
cense Closing Date. 
01/31/08 All applicants 
selected tor employ- 
ment are subject lo post- 
offer pre-employment 
drug screaming. Appli- 
cants should be at least 
IB years old Or older lor 
most positions, but no 
younger than 16 tor any 
position. To be consid- 
ered for an available posi- 
tion you must complete a 
City of Manhattan applica- 
tion and return it to the at- 
tention of Human Re- 
sources by 5p.m. on the 
closing dale For inlorma 
tlon visit City Hai. 1101 
Poynti Ave, wwwciman- 
battan ks us/)obs asp., or 
email |obs#a manhattsn ■ 
ks.ua Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



t iiidaiob nuclei 

tin' lifilpwaiiii-'i 

sit tion. 



MAKE A DIFFERENCE! 
DO SOMETHING DIF 

FERENTI Camp coun- 
selors wanted Friendly 
Pines Camp. Piescott. 
A2. Is hmng lor 08 sea 
son 5/24- 7<31 30 plus ac- 
tivities equestrian, water- 
ski, waterfront, ropes 
course. climbing and 
moral CompeWive salary 
Call 928-445 2)28. e-mail 
infold frlendlyplnes com or 
visit website www frlend- 
lyplnes com lot applica- 
tion.' Information Have the 
summer ol a liletime" 
MAMHATTAN COUNTRY 
Club has Bag Room/ 
Range/ Carl staff open- 
ings Must be able lo tin 
approximately thirty 

pounds overhead Apply 
In person at 1531 North 
10th Street. Lower Level 
Tuesday- Friday 8:30a.m. 
• 5pm 

NOW HIRING Subway 
Work up lo 20 hours a 
week, meals provided 
Day. night, and weekend 
shifts needed Will work 
around schedule Pick up 
application at any Sub- 
way, including the Student 
Union 

PART-TIME receptionist ' 
office assistant experi- 
ence with quickbooks and 
Microsoft office wnfien 
and verhal communicslxjn 
skills important ability lo 
multi-task and work In s 
dynamic environment 

send resume lo 

ch ad ■ ncs-online com 

PART-TIME SALES Faith 
Furniture in Manhattan is 
seeking dependable 

associates for sales and 
other duties Weekends 
and weekdays as avail- 
able Every fourth week- 
end Off A great part -lime 
(Ob 1 Apply in person 302 
East Hwy 24 

PRESCHOOL/ NURSERY 
positions available tor lo- 
cal college students on 
Wednesday and/ or Sun- 
day mornings at Faith 
Evangelical Free Church 
We have a flexible work- 
ing environment and great 
children to work with. Pay 
is S7 10 an hour Contact 
Chns for more informa- 
tion, chns barker 19 felc- 
manhaftan org or 766-776- 
2066 



CaDTc3-332-65»>tr 



SllUCOUDoAS 



PROGRAM ASSISTANT 
I Sun sat Zoo). Starting 
Salary: $6 30/ hour (Sea- 
sonal! Position Respon- 
sibilities To facilitate a 
variety of hxjh qualify, rev- 
enue generating, and edu- 
cational programs such as 
birthday parties, cam- 
pouls. classes, and clubs. 
as well ax live animal pro- 
grama at Sunset Zoo Po- 
sition also assists with the 
supervision and training 
volunteers Experience 
Required: High school 
graduate of GED re- 
quired: plus background 
knowledge of ioos, ani- 
mals and current educa- 
tion practices vital Excel- 
lent public speaking skills 
and ability to adapt to a 
variety of audiences and 
volunleei needs required 
Must be able to work with 
little supervision Position 
schedule very versatile, 
working one to thirty 
hours per week, depend- 
ing on staff needs and per- 
sonal schedule Special 
Requirement: Musi have 
and maintain a valkl 
driver s license Closing 
Data: Open until tilled AH 
applicants selected tor 
employment are subject 
lo post-offer pre-employ- 
ment drug screening. Ap- 
plicants should be al least 
18 years ol age or older 
for most positions, but not 
younger than 16 for any 
position To be consid- 
ered tor an available posi- 
tion, you musl complete a 
City ol Manhattan applica- 
tion and return it to Ihe at 
teniion ol Human Re- 
sources by 5pm on the 
closing date For informa- 
tion visit City Had. 1101 
Poynti Ave. wwwci.man. 
hattan ka us/)oba.asp., or 
e -ma* jobs >3 o. manhattan 
ka.ua. Equal opportunity 
Employer 

PROJECT MANAGER 
CivicPlus has an opening 
in our Manhattan head 
quarters office lor a full- 
time Protect Manager 
This challenging posrtion 
entails managing multiple 
website redesign protects 
from start lo finish Posi- 
tion requires attention to 
detail, the ability lo man- 
age multiple tasks, priori- 
ties and deadlines, and a 
cheerful attitude Training 
is provided Benefits in- 
clude Hearth. Dental. Paid 
Holidays, Paid Vacation 
and 40 IK matching 
Email resume in text or 
Word format lo 
jobaOcrvicplus com 



SPRING/ SUMMER Sea- 
sonal Seasonal posi- 
tions, noo-benelit eligible 
Starting Salaries: $5 85/ 
hour to $24 00/ game, 
pending position and quali- 
fications. Positions List- 
ing: Umpires, referees, In- 
structors, and program su- 
pervisors lot various 
sports programs (base- 
ball, Softball, basketball, 
socoei volleyball, etc!; 
Day camp Counselors 
and Coordinators baltfiekJ 
maintenance, swim 

coach, lifeguard cashier, 
basket checker, and water 
aerobics instructor tor Ihe 
pools Special Require- 
ments: Applicants must 
be at least 16 years ol 
age Prior seasonal em- 
ployees are encouraged 
lo le-appty Closing Data: 
Applications will be ac- 
cepted until positions are 
tilled All appllcanls se- 
lected for employment 
are subject lo post -offer 
p r e employment drug 
screening. Appllcanls 
should be at least 18 
years of age or older fot 
most positions, but not 
younger than 16 for any 
posmon. To be consul- 
eied lor an available post 
tion. you must complete a 
City ol Manhattan appiica 
lion and return It to the at 
tention of Human Re- 
sources by 5pm. on Ihe 
closing dale For informa- 
tion visll City Hall. 1101 
Poynti Ave. wwwci man- 
hattan ka us/|obs asp or 
e-mail jobs® a manhattan • 
ks us Equal opportunity 
Employer 

STEEL A PIPE Supply 
Company- Inventory Ana- 
lyst Assistant There is an 
immediate opening lot an 
Inventory analyst assis- 
tant al out corporate of- 
fice Position is respond 
ble lor creating migration 
materials analyzing and 
monitoring SAP software 
processes, and assisting 
in analysis of warehouse 
cycle counting dais. AIM 
support for customer ser- 
vice and sales staff Quali- 
fied candidates will have 
basic math and account- 
ing Wont experience m in- 
ventory control a plus 
Two years college educa- 
tion preferred Interested 
applicants should submit 
resume to Steel & Pipe 
Supply. Inv. Analyst As- 
sist ., PC- Box 1688. Man- 
hattan. KS 86505 Equal 
Opportunity Employer 



Need a place to advertise? 

We have space. 

Connect the dots and call 

785.532.6555 



•y*t 




STEEL 6 PIPE SUPPLY 
COMPANY- Buslnesa 
Analyst There Is an Im- 
mediate opening lor a 
Business Analyst al our 
corporate otlta. This tuB- 
nme position is part ol an 
IT Development team, 
whose task is to execute 
protects involving informa- 
tion lech oology to supply 
added business value 
The Business Analyst po- 
sition is responsible lor de 
vetopmg business require 
menls, testing solutions, 
and training users on 
those solutions Qualified 
candidates will have excel- 
lent people skills and 
must be detail oriented 
Two- live years expen- 
ence and/ or education in 
Business or related field 
required Knowledge ol Mi- 
crosof! Office applications 
required Competitive pay 
with excellent benefits In- 
terested applicanls should 
e mail resume end cover 
letter to pautn8t#ta 
OSffl oi mail to SPS, Atten- 
tion Matt, PO Box 1688. 
Manhattan, Kansas 

66505 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

STUDENT PUBLIC A 

TIONS Inc haa a part- 
time position (or a Madrv 
tosh technician available 
The tech support leam 
maintains about 50 Macin- 
tosh workstations, provid- 
ing software support as 
well ss performing gen- 
eral hardware mainte- 
nance. Any experience 
with Mac OSX, design 
software such as Adobe 
Photoshop. Adobe InDe- 
sign, and nerworkinij Ii 
helplul but not required 
Pay starts al $650 per 
hour wrth the opportunity 
to advance Must be a tun- 
time student at KSU Ap- 
plications may be picked 
up in 113 Kedue or online 
at htipz/wwwkstalecotle. 
gian eom/spub/ Down- 
load the second appiica 
Don at this link. Applies 
ton deadline is 5 p m Fri 
day, February IS. 2008 
Please include your 
spnng 2008 dass sched 
ule 

STUDENT TECHNICIAN 
position opening $7 00/ 
hour Hours required 20 
hours' week when dass is 
m se ss ion. 40 hours/ 
week during summer and 
breaks Job description 
Pickup and delivery ol 
computers printers, etc 
to various campus loca- 
tions (valid drivers license 
required I. general PC end 
pricier maintenance and 
repair, general inventory 
and accounting functions 
Preferred qualifications 
1st or 2nd year student m 
computer, electronics or 
related major, applicants 
with demonstrated me- 
chanical apWude. com- 
puter maintenance experi- 
ence helpful How to ap- 
ply Interested applicanls 
should come in person lo 
181 East Stadium lo till 
out an application Please 
contact Anthony Phillips 
at Anthony & ksu edu with 
any questions about the 
position 



TECHNICAL SUPPORT 
positron available for K- 
slale undergraduate stu- 
dent wtlh a variety ol 
skills Musi have good In- 
sMparsonal and problem 
solving skills Experience 
with PC's and popular soft- 
ware applications such as 
Word Perted, MS Woro, 
MS Excel. MS Internet Ex- 
plorer, Internet applica- 
tions, basic web page edit- 
ing and Windows appiica 
Dona desired. Musi have a 
technical understanding ol 
Micro soft Windows Sum- 
mer availability neces- 
sary Computer Network 
experience preferred Ap- 
plications musl be submit- 
ted st Department of Com- 
munications IET 211 Um- 
oerger Hall. 765-532- 
8270 Applications wil be 
available/ accepted until 
January 25. 2008 Plesss 
attach resume with Ihe ap 
plication 

WILOCATSNEEDJOBS ■ 
COM. PAID survey takers 
needed in Manhattan 
100N free 10 (oin Click on 
surveys 

WORK AT home, book 
keeping and sales repre- 
sentative You can work 
at home and asm up to 
$3000- $4000 monthly 
Contact if interested E 
mail kjboclaroiftnopi net 

WORKING MOM needs 
babysltlet for 11 year ok) 
three nights a week includ- 
ing some weekend' 
s Hours 5:30p.m. 10 7- 
00a m WUI pay $30 00 a 
night Easy part- time job 
Call Kathy al 765-537- 
8856 or 785-410-7533 

ZOO CREW Supervisor 
Sunset Zoo Starting 
Salary: $5 85/ hour ipart- 
lime non-bane lit eligible) 
Experience Required: 
Diploma or GED required. 
plus excellent supervisory 
skids, ekpenence working 
and animal 
vital Musi 
maintain a valid driver's li- 
cense and be able to work 
Mondays (no more than 
tour hou rs Incu mbent 
will superv-.e and edu- 
cate several teen volun- 
teers working wllh basic 
animal husbandry Clos- 
ing Oats: Open until tilled 



GROWING COMPANY 
seeking motivated K 
Slater's who wish lo earn 
money last working part 
time online from home 
www lavidarlca abunia 
com 




Open M.iiWi'i 




DINETTE, CHEST of 
drawers, desk, rocker 
wall unn, dresser, shel 1 
some antique fumitun- 
miscellaneous, bear cot- 
lectaUe!. 785-587-4141 

FOR SALE Extremal-, 
clean and comfy beige 
couch $199 or best offer 
call Tracy at 316-250 

c'cmiyY Yard Sotes 



MULTI-FAMILY SALE 

Manhattan Junior crew 
rowing club Microwave 
vacuum, furniture. Cloth 
Ing. bikes, etc Saluiday 
January 26, Bam- 12pm 
(Bag sale- 1030am) 
3015 Anderson, (next In 
Rays Apple Market. Plaza 
Wesl Shopping Cjnter) 




Transportation 




lect to post-offer pre-em- 
ployment drug screen- 
ing. Applicanls should be 
al least 18 years of age or 
older lor most positions, 
out not younger than 16 
lot any posmon To be 
considered lor an avail 
able position, you must 
complete a City of Manhat- 
tan application and return 
it In the attention ol Hu- 
man Resources by 5pm 
on tha closing date For in- 
formation visit City Hall. 
1101 Poynti Ave, wwwci.- 
manhallan ks us/jobs. - 
aap, or e mail |Obs®ei.- 
manhattan. ka.us or Equal 
opportunity Employer 



1999 DODGE Grand Cain 
van special edition, new 
brakes, tltes $2800 01 
best ofler 7853173065 



Instead of this 

random black 

space* you 

could haw* 

placed a 

classified . 



Call 785 532 6555 



Affordable , 

Luxury Apartments 



lOIS Kearney 



2b*MiV2 bath 



JIMMY JOHN'S 

Gourmet Sub Sandwich Shop 
Now hiring crew members and 
drivers. Flexible scheduling, 
free/discounted meals, j 
great pay, and a fun 
work environment. 
Apply in person 
today at 1212 Moro. 1 





!!!! LEASING !!!! 

Now, June or August 
Apartments, Houses, Duplexes 
1,2,3,4 bedrooms 
587-9000 mm 

Emerald Property Management 

wwwemeraltjDroDertvmanagemenLcom 

L 



<Wltki.<P<u>htx£Ut. 



Locally owned and'mansgod 
by Dolbort • Janrt Wllki 

785.776.2102 

Other locations available! 
'. evl I ksaipts .com 




fyrtTCc 

Summer/ Fall Leasir 

Best deal in town on 

1 or 2 bedrooms! 

Student specials if leased by Feb. 5 
call now 785.539.2951 



{ 



Available Now! 

d> 1 -4 bedrooms 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



su|do|ku 

Pill in the grid so that every row. 

every column, and every 3 x 3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 



Give us a call! 



DIAMOND Q S3aS 



t I 4 L t * I A I t 



Advertise 

in tha 
C\aee\f\ede 

7M-B52-66B6 



JGTMJ 

SPORTSWEAR 

Graphic Designer 



Go Direct Go GTM" 



Graduating in May in Graphic Design? Start part-lime this spring and 
lu-uniu' lull tiint upon graduation. GTM Sportswear is looking for a 
(.native person to join our marketing team. Responsibilities include 
layout of direct mail material, catalogs, tlyers, ads and other 
promotional materials. Lxperience in InDesign, Photoshop, and 
Illustrator preferred. Photography experience is a plus. Benefit 
package includes health, dental, vision, 401k, profit sharing, paid 
holiday, and paid time off Please send your resume and salary 
requirements lo; GTM Sportswear. 520 McCaU Rd, Manhattan, KS 
tV6502 or email humanresourcestrSigtmcuni 
If you have a portfolio online or on GD, please provide this as well 



MCCULLOUGH DEVELOPMENT says 

Don't move! m 



"t&fififfiffiifii: 



Stay with McCullough 
and save money, time and 
all the headaches of moving. 

mdiproperties.com 785.776.3804 



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a t www.sudoku . com 



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Villi! ll.H rt-Mllls • ( .ill lilt .ipiNlilltllM'Ilt 

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WMW 



PAGE 14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2008 



I 





Come visit us at your 

career fair on 

January 29! 



» j.» 



We would like to congratulate the Kansas 
State students who have accepted full-time 
positions: 

• Mark Burnett 

• David Dick 

• Justin Patterson 

• Steve Bollin 

• Brian Knipp 

• Andrew Lanter 

• Kyle O'Brien 

• Emanuel Arnold 

• Alex Evans 

• John Grabbe 



-■ 



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Archer Daniels Midland Company is a world leader 
in BioEnergy and has a premier position in the 
agricultural processing value chain. We count on 
the ambition and creativity of our colleagues to 
help us enhance our position as a global leader in 
the development of food, feed and fuel products. 

Whether you are looking to start your career or a 
summer internship, ADM is the place to be. As a 
Fortune 100 company, we are committed to 
providing opportunities, training and benefits that 
exceed expectations. 

At ADM, the opportunity is yours. 

Visit us online at www.adm.jobs! 




ADM 



■ 



KANSAS 



STATE 



4- 




www.kstitKolleg ian.com 



MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2008 



Vol 1H I No 85 



Rodeo gamble 




Josiyn Brown | COLLEGIAN 

Sitting in the middle of Weber Arena, four professors watch as a sheep is released during a joking round of bull poker. The next round was played with four 
contest jnts from the audience with a real boll. 

Cowboy poker amusing at first, then turns dangerous 



By Sarah Burford 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The fifth-annual Brett Cushenbery Me- 
morial Bullriding gave poker players a run 
for their money on Saturday during an event 
called cowboy poker at Weber Arena 

"Coming up here, we've got some cow- 
boy poker ... if you know what I'm talkin' 
about," the announcer said 

Some audience members knew what he 
was talking about - it could be a dangerous 
event. Others shrugged their shoulders, not 
knowing what to expect 

He encouraged the K-State professors in 
the stands to come down for a game of poker 
played in the middle of the arena. The play- 
ers were Ken Odde, head of the Department 
of Animal Sciences and Industry; Dave Nich- 
ols, professor in animal sciences and indus- 
try; Dan Moscr. associate professor in animal 
sciences and industry, and Russ Goltlob, ro- 
deo coach 

The four sat down at the card table in the 
middle of the ring, not knowing what to ex- 
pect The gates flung open, and a sheep came 
rushing into the arena. Cowboys and clowns 
playfully tried to excite the sheep, and au- 
dience members chuckled They knew what 
was supposed to come out of that gate in real 
cowboy poker. 



After several more rounds of bullriding, 
the next poker contestants made their way 
to the card table in the middle of the are- 
na, wearing plain street clothes These play 
ers actually bought into the game for SI each 
to win a prize of $100 for the last person sit- 
ting at the table, 

They got comfortable and the cowboys 
and clowns manned their stations around the 
arena A couple more cowboys on horses en- 
tered the ring as well. 

The gate shot open once more to re- 
veal not a sheep, but a Mexican fighting bull 
It ran straight for the card table, and with- 
in seconds, tossed it to the ground and jos- 
tled all the contestants to their feet. But the 
bull went after one player in particular, Dave 
Schreiner of Frankfort. Kan 

"It was a rush," he said still dusty from 
being knocked around the arena "By the 
time I saw the bull, he was right behind me," 

Schreiner said though he knows what 
cowboy poker entails, he had half-expected 
a sheep to enter the arena again instead of a 
bull. 

The bull butted its head against Schrein- 
er a few times while Schreiner was balled up 
on the ground, covering his head. The other 
players had backed away from the bull, but 

SttFOKift Page 10 




Joilyn Brown | Uil.LM.JAN 

During the 5th Annual Brett Cushenbery Memorial 
Bullriding, Kenny Upton, Manhattan resident, 
attempts to ride a bull for eight seconds, 



New city 

assistant 

manager 

starts term 



By Adnannr OeWeese 
KANSAS S' A ft. COLLEGIAN 

Lauren Palmer moved to 
Manhattan a week ago. but 
she already has familiarized 
herself with the cily. 

Palmer starts her role as 
assistant city manager today. 
She replaces Diane Stoddard, 
who resigned as Manhattan's 
deputy city manager in Octo- 
ber 2007 to take the open po 
sition as the city of Lawrence's 
assistant manager 

To learn as much as she 
could about the city. Palmer 
said she read the Manhattan 
Mercury and the city's Web 
site and studied the city's bud- 
get. 

"I just came out here a 
week early before I came to 
my job and tried to observe as 
much as I can what the com- 
munity is about," she said. "I'm 
excited to get started and fig- 
ure out how I can make con- 
tributions to the office. It's re- 
ally important to me, coming 
to a new community, to get en- 
gaged in the community." 

[ason Hilgers, who also 
serves as an assistant city man 
ager. said Palmer will primari- 
ly assist with economic devel- 
opment funding assistance in 
collaboration with the Cham- 
ber of Commerce and develop 
agenda packets for City Com- 
mission meetings and work 
sessions. 

Among other responsibil- 
ities. Palmer also will be re- 
sponsible for directing legis 
lative and intergovernmental 
activities to facilitate interac- 
tion among city officials, city 
management and state legisla- 
ture and will serve as the city 
managers liaison to the Kiley 
County Law Board and other 
committees 

Palmer previously served 
as management analyst in 
the city manager's office in 
Des Moines, Iowa, where she 
served as the liaison to four 
city departments; coordinat- 
ed grant administration, con- 
tract oversight, performance 
measurement and reporting; 
and worked on budget devel- 
opment, according to the city 
of Manhattan's Web site 

5«* MANAGER Paf* 10 



Police seize 

narcotics 

equipment 

from store 



By Sarah Burford 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Riley County police found 
drug paraphernalia at Rockstar 
and Rogers, 715 N. 12th St, 
while serving a search warrant 
on Thursday, according to a Ri- 
ley County Police Department 
report 

The warrant was part of an 
ongoing investigation into the 
sale of drug paraphernalia in 
the Manhattan area. 

During the search at Rock 
star and Rogers, police found 
items used to store, contain, 
conceal, weigh and ingest illic- 
it drugs, according to the police 
report. 

RCPD Lt Kurt Moldrup 
said the police department had 
investigated a drug transaction 
within the business, which con- 
nected the seized parapherna- 
lia with the use of drugs. Mol- 
drup said the drug parapherna- 
lia were being sold in the store 
at one point. 

No arrests were made and 
further investigation is pending 



Spring recruitment sponsored by Greek Affairs for first time 



By Jenna Scavuwo I 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

This spring, Greek Affairs is pub- 
licizing a new approach to recruiting 
members into a sorority's sisterhood. 
While many might associate sorority 
recruitment with a rigid, structured 
and stressful week schedule, Sorori- 
ty Spring Recruitment allows its par- 
ticipants to explore the 11 sorority 
houses in a relaxed, personable set- 
ting 

Though Greek Affairs and the 
Panhellenic Council have sponsored 
Sorority Spring Recruitment in the 
past, this spring the Greek organize 
tions have worked to positively pub- 
licize its informal version of sorority 
recruitment. 

Previously, only houses which 
had not matched their member quo- 
tas participated in spring recruit- 
ment. 

This year marks the first year 
that each sorority house opened its 
recruitment to potential new soror 
iiy members, though only six chap- 
ters are accepting new members 

Chi Omega, Kappa Alpha The- 
ta, Kappa Delta. Alpha Chi Omega. 
Sigma Kappa and Pi Beta Phi are the 
only houses aiming to distribute bids 
for spring membership. 

"Spring Recruitment is a chance 
to offer girls who hadn't gone through 
formal recruitment a look at and 
get a feel for all (he houses in a less 
threatening environment," said Erin 
Parrott, vice president of the Panhel- 



lenic Council "It allows girls to get 
a better feet for houses by offering 
them more time to look around and 
get to know individual members bet 
ter in an actual setting, rather than a 
structured setting, which is how For- 
mal Recruitment is" 

Recruitment numbers have not 
dropped, and have in fact increased 
to the highest number ever this past 
fall, said Kimberly Jones, director of 
continuous open bidding and reten 
lion 

However, many chapters have 
suffered a problem with members 
leaving during the school year, she 
said 

Spring Recruitment is designed 
to both recruit new members in the 
spring to replace previously lost ones 
or allow potential new members to 
begin looking al the various chapters 
before Formal Recruitment begins, 
Jones said 

It helps to have a full house," 
Jones said. "... Spring Recruitment 
aims to have each house reach this 
goal" 

There has been a tremendous in- 
crease in the number of girls signed 
up to participate in Spring Recruit 
ment this year, said Jones. Fifty-four 
girls are going through the Spring 
Recruitment process 

"Spring Recruitment improves 
the Greek community as a whole 
because it gives the sororities more 
publicity, which will allow everyone 
to see how great the Greek commu- 
nity truly is," Jones said "Also, open 




Mttt Castro | I nil K, IAN 
Driver Travis Aaron Janning* freshman in pre -professional architectural engineering 
opens the van door (or Mlchtll* Pflugttovft, freshman in business administration pre- 
professional, and, Kriittn Payne, freshman in public health nutrition. Both the women 
participated in the sorority spring recruitment. 



ing up the houses allows for a level 
playing field and ties and strengthens 
the houses together Spring Recruit- 
ment really promotes Greek unity" 

To participate in the Spring Re- 
cruitment process, prospective mem 
bers gave their names to Greek Af- 
fairs, which distributed the names to 
all the houses, said Parrott. 

The potential members were 



told which houses were accepting 
new spring members into their chap- 
ters, but were allowed to take tours 
of all 11 during Open House 

The chapters that are searching 
for and accepting new membership 
will continue to invite prospective 
members to sorority events after 

S» RECRUITMENT Page 10 




TOP CATS PAGE 6 

Men's and Women's basketball still undefeated in Big 12, 




PAG£2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2008 



'Call 




776-5577 

Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 




THIS WEEK 



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time 

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SC0TTAV00S 

2815 ANDERSON Ste. C 

MANHATTAN 
scottvoosOallstate com 



A look at events that took place during this week in history 



TODAY 



1986: CHALLENGER EXPLODES 



At the space shuttle Challenger Dried oft from 
Cape Canaveral. Fla., hundreds on the ground stared 
in disbelief as the shuttle exploded in a forking plume 
ol smoke and fire Millions more watched the wrench 
mg tragedy unfold on live television There were no 
suivivois among the seven-member ere* 

Christ,! McAuliffee was on her way to becom- 
ing the first ordinary U.S. civilian to travel into space. 
McAullffe. a i 7-year-old high school social studies 
teacher, won a competition that earned her a place on 
the Challenger crew After lengthy investigation*. It 
was determined that the explosion was caused by the 
failure of an "O ring" seal in one of the two solid-fuel 
rockets 




TUESDAY 



1936: U.S. BASEBALL HALL OF FAME ELECTS 
1ST MEMBERS 



Ty Cobb. Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Christy Matthewson and Walter Johnson 
were the first members inducted into the U.S. Baseball Hall of fame 

The Hall of Fame actually had its beginnings in 1935 when plans were made 
to build a museum devoted to baseball and its 1 00-year history. 

A private organisation based mCooperStOwn. NY, called the Clark Founda 
tion thought establishing the Baseball Hall of Fame in their city would help to 
reinvigciate the area's Depression-rawaoed economy by attracting tourists. 

Today, with apprommately 350,000 visitors per year, the Hall of Fame contin- 
ues to be the hub of all things baseball. 

It has elected 278 individuals, in all. including 225 players. 17 managers, B 
umpires and 2B executives and pioneers 



THE BLOTTER | ARRESTS IN RILEY COUNTY 



WEDNESDAY 



1948: MOHANDAS GANDHI 
ASSASINATED 



Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the 
political and spiritual leader of the Indian 
independence movement, was assassi- 
nated in New Delhi by a Hindu fanatic 

known as Mahatma, or 'the great 
soul," during his lifetime, Gandhi's persua- 
sive methods of civil disobedience influ- 
enced leaders of civil rights movements 
around the world, especially Martin Luther 
King Jr in the United States 




THURSDAY 



1968: VIET CONG ATTACK U.S. 
EMBASSY 



On this day in 1 968. as part of the let Offensive, a squad of Viet Cong 
guerillas attacked the US. Embassy in Saigon, Veitnam The soldiers seised 
the embassy and held it for mi hours until an assault force of US. paratroop- 
ers landed by helicopter on the building's roof and routed the Viet Cong 



FRIDAY 



1884: OXFORD DICTIONARY PRINTED 



On this day in 1 884. the first portion, or fascicle, of the Oxford 
English Dictionary, considered the most comprehensive and accurate 
dictionary of the English language, was published. 

Today, the dictionary's second edition is available online to 
subscribers and is updated quarterly with ovei 1 ,000 new entries and 

revisions. 

— hiiforychonnefcom 



The Collegian takes reports directly from 
the Riley County Police Department. 
Wheel locks or minor traffic violations are 
not listed because of space constraints. 

THURSDAY, JAN. 24 

Crfitlni Sharleen War go, Ogden, Kan. at 
10 23 am for driving with a canceled Or 
suspended license Bond was $7SO 
Edward Lee Swarthout, Clay Center. 
Kan., at 11:47 a.m for theft criminal dam- 
age to property and burglary. Bond was 
$2,500 

Allyion f ranclne Green street, 701 H, 
Ninth St., Apt 3. at 1 2;S0 p.m. for failure to 
appear Bond was 526,500 
Jessica Ann Greening, 1026 Osage St. 
Apt. 22, at 2 36 p m. for failure to appear. 
Bond was SI 00 

Gary Lee Smith Jr., Ogden. Kan., at 329 
p.m for probation violation Bond was 



$2,000. 

Oscar AuretlO Arevalo-Iuniga, 844, Mis- 
sion Ave., at 4:10 p.m for failure to appear 
Bond was 55 000 

Krlttl Ralynn Wldtntr, Ogden, Kan., at 
4:39 p.m. for driving with a canceled or 
suspended license and habitual violation. 
Bond was St 000 

Sherry Heather Sperman. 517 5 15th St., 
at 4.45 p.m. for battery. Bond was SSO0, 

FRIDAY, JAN, 25 

Stefana Dawn Murphy, 1901 Rocky Ford 
Ave., at 1 21 5 a.m for battery Bond was 
$S00 

Shannon Irene Parsons, 221 5 College 
Ave,, Apt f 122, at 2:13 a.m. for driving 
under the influence Bond was $750 
Marlel Rose Edwards, 1865 Piatt St., 
basement, at 4 35 a.m. for driving under 
the influence Bond was $2,000 



TUESDAY'S WEATHER 

PARTLY CLOUDY 
High | 32* Low | 20 s 



CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS 

If you see something that should be corrected call news editor Owen Kennedy at 7BS-SJ2-6SS* 

si email iolirg>ork&ipttb.kiu edu. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The Collegian, a student newspaper at Kansas State 
University, is published by Student Publications Inc. it 
is published weekdays during the school year and on 
Wednesdays during the summer. Periodical postage is paid 
at Manhattan, KS POSTMASTEH: Send address changes 
to the circulation desk at Kedrie 103. Manhattan, KS 
66506-7167. First copy free, additional copies 25 cents 
1USPS 291 020) C Kansas State Collegian. 2007 



THE PLANNER 

CAMPUS BULLETIN BOARD 



Applications for Student 
Alumni Board are available 
at the K-State Alumni Center 
or online at www.*-slofe 
com/itudentsyjtudentofum 
ntt>oard.aipx. An information 
reception will take place at 
the Alumni Center at 4 30 
p.m. Feb S for anyone inter- 
ested in learning more about 
the group Applications are 
due by S p m Feb 7 at the 
Alumni Center. 

The KSHSAA baseball rules 
meeting will take place 
at 7:30 p m Feb S at the 
Manhattan High School - 
East campus. The meeting 
Is for anyone interested 
in umpiring high-school 
baseball. Anyone with ques 



tions can call Brad Hall at 
785 539-0810. 

The Riley County 
Crimestoppers organiza- 
tion will have its an- 
nual Winter Benefit Softball 
Tournament Feb 23-24 at 
Twin Oaks Softball Complex. 
Mens and co-rec teams are 
invited to participate. The 
entry fee is $115. and the 
sign- up deadline is Feb. 18. 



To place an item in the Cam- 
pus Bulletin, stop by Kediie 
116 and fill out a form or 
e-mail the news editor at 
coHegidnLjjpuD.isu.edu by 
1 1 a.m. two days before it is 
to run 



Call me today about renter s insurance 

(785) 776-7777 



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All Freshmen with a 3.0 or higher are invited to apply for 

Silver Key Sophomore Honorary. 

Informational meeting January 29" 
5:30 In the Union Forum Hall 
Application! can be found online it For additional questions (mail 
ksu.edu/ silverkty Megan Di rfci, mdirkse ksu.rd u. or 

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CAREER FAIR 

what: 

Meef with representatives trom o variety 

of agricultural-related organizations to 

learn about jobs and inlemshipsl 

when: 

TOMORROW Tuesday January 29 

11:00 a.m. -4:00 pm. 

where: 

K-State Student union Ballroom 

Questions? 

I *—• ana IfltMw* tjtnu> 

i*wMi>MWf 

'anuinHHnm» cM i l w irti. m ^ M , MV , B 




MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



RAGE 3 



Study finds weight-loss surgery 
helpful in fighting Type-2 diabetes 



By Sarah Burf or d 
KANSAS STATE COIXEtilAN 

Weight -loss surgeries have 
proven more effective for cur- 
ing Type 2 diabetes than stan- 
dard medical treatment, ac- 
cording to a recent study that 
appeared in an article Wednes- 
day in The New York Times. 

Sixty patients participated 
in the study, and 73 percent of 
those who had the surgery had 
complete remissions of diabe- 
tes Of the patients who were 
given counseling on diet and 
exercise instead of having sur- 
gery, only 13 percent had re- 
missions of diabetes, according 
to the article 

Since Type 2 diabetes usu- 
ally is caused by obesity, those 
who lost an average of 20.7 
percent of their body weight 
through surgery were more 
likely to be rid of their diabetes. 
Those who did not have sur- 
gery lost an average of 1-7 per- 
cent of their body weight, ac- 
cording to the article 

The surgery performed in 
the study is called adjustable 
gastric banding A band is in- 
serted through two small slits 
and is cinched around the stom 
ach so patients will eat less 

Dr. Pouad Hachem. an at 
tending surgeon at the Geary 
Community Hospital in Geary 
County, said Type 2 diabetes is 



earned when a person's body 
cannot generate enough insulin 
to accommodate its large size. 

Insulin facilitates ingest- 
ed sugar getting into the body's 
cells. He said when there is not 
enough insulin to perform this 
digestion, the sugar stays out- 
side of the cells and turns into 
fat 

Hachem said weight -loss 
surgeries have been proven 
to cure diabetes 90 percent of 
the time He said conventional 
methods like diet and exercise 
work less than 1 percent of the 
lime for people who are mor- 
bidly obese. 

"No studies say one sur- 
gery is better than the other," 
Hachem said. "They all achieve 
one ultimate goal - weight loss. 
If (the diabetes] is not reversed, 
at least it's better under con- 
trol" 

Erin Dawson, assistant di- 
rector of fitness at Peters Rec- 
reation Center, said people 
should try conventional meth- 
ods for curing their diabetes be- 
fore surgical methods 

"(Nutrition and exercise] 
are definitely something peo 
pie should try first," Dawson 
said, "They will have to live a 
healthy lifestyle anyway after 
surgery. Why put off the inev- 
itable?" 

She said to prevent or im- 
prove diabetes, people should 



engage in cardiovascular exer- 
cise three to five days a week 
She also recommended two to 
th ree days of we ight ■ lifting . 

"Exercise plays a huge 
part, [as do) talking to a dieti- 
cian, and eating well." Dawson 
said. 

Steph Moore, senior in di- 
etetics, said her grandfather has 
Type 2 diabetes She said he 
probably would not be willing 
to have weight -loss surgery for 
it because of his age. so he diets 
and exercises instead 

But eating healthy can be 
hard for him since he is "set 
in his ways" and isn't ready 
to change his lifestyle, Moore 
said 

The people who caught 
their diabetes early, within two 
years, had more success with 
the surgery, according to the ar- 
ticle. Moore said she thinks sur- 
gery would be better for young- 
er people. 

"I think surgery would be 
a last resort after trying diet and 
exercise and consulting a dieti- 
cian," Moore said. 

She said surgery might be 
too dangerous for people who 
have a very high body mass in- 
dex because the wound would 
heal poorly, along with other 
factors. She said many places 
that perform these surgeries re 
quire patients to meet with a di- 
etician after having surgery 



Proposed Hy-Vee store plans to expand 



By Ells* Podhajsky 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The city of Manhat- 
tan has been involved in a 
downtown redevelopment 
controversy for the past sev- 
eral months. 

The latest and perhaps 
most disputed issue has been 
surrounding the impiemen 
tation and the expansion of 
a Hy-Vee grocery store in 
the north side of the down- 
town redevelopment area 

An amendment to the 
store's development plan 
was passed earlier this 
month, adding an additional 
10,000 square feet onto its 
original 68.300 square feet 
design, said Karen Mayse, 
president for Manhattan's 
League of Women Voters. 

"With thai vote, the 
store basically had the green 
light to build," said city com- 
missioner )im Sherow, who 
voted against the amend- 
ment 

"The store jusl wasn't 
meeting the original lay- 
out and design that every- 
body had agreed upon." he 
said. "I think the other com 
missiuners who voted for it 
weren't happy with it; they 
just didn't see a viable alter- 
native." 

City Commissioner 

Bruce Snead said he voted 
for the expansion because 
the role of the north district 
- where the Hy-Vee will be 



located - in the financing of 
downtown redevelopment 
was an important consider- 
ation 

He said he felt passing 
the amendment was the best 
action for moving the South 
district reconstruction for- 
ward 

However, Mayse said 
League members thought 
the cily should have better 
planning when it comes to 
the redevelopment. 

There are already four 
large grocery stores within 
a mile of where the Hy-Vee 
will be located, and she said 
the League thinks the new 
store will put at least one of 
them out of business. 

"You're causing the 
problem you were hoping to 
solve with redevelopment," 
she said. 

Because of the amend- 
ment. Mayse said the new 
grocery store will not only 
be more than twice the size 
of the Dillons near Turtle 
Creek Boulevard, but il also 
will come within four feet of 
the city's historic Strausser 
house - the oldest standing 
house in Manhattan 

In addition, she said it 
will limit the total amount 
of parking for the area's 
proposed housing develop- 
ments. 

"We think it's really im- 
portant lo have housing 
down there," Mayse said 
"We need a mixed develop- 



ment in that area, and hav 
ing housing will provide 
consumers who will frequent 
businesses downtown " 

Limited parking leads 
to limited living space, she 
said. 

Despite much opposi- 
tion, the expansion has been 
mostly finalized 

The only aspect in ques 
tion depends on whether 
the state law prohibiting the 
sale of wine and spirits in 
supermarkets is changed. 

If this happens, Hy-Vee 
plans to build even bigger, 
she said 

Mayse also said at this 
point, the community does 
not have much faith in the 
redevelopment plans, in 
terms of believing what they 
were initially told. 

But Snead said he dis- 
agreed. 

There are residents who 
will never be happy with 
the redevelopment 's out 
come, Snead said, but there 
also are those who under 
stand that during the plan 
ning process, ideas evolve 
and are modified 

"I think Hy-Vee will be 
successful in this communi- 
ty,' he said. "The public COB 
cern about downtown rede 
velopment is an important 
one, and one we need to ad 
dress with presentation and 
the sharing uf information 
of where we arc, and where 
we're going." 




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ia*«««««MiMtiiMiiiMMM«MiaiMaiii 



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OPINION 



PAGE 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MONDAY. JANUARY 28, 2008 



HIT OR MISS | 



ft* ^mul bori wto M <x M& tapo and write them 
after i majority wte. This is the Collegian's offkul optnon 




HIT | NICE WEATHER 

Despite Kansas's roller-coaster history 
of temperatures, we're on top and above 
freezing for the time being. 




MISS | NO GOOD TV 

Between the writers' strike and it be- 
ing the first weekend since late July that 
football has not been on television, there 
are too many boring sports events and 
re-runs to even turn the television on. 




HIT | ENTHUSIASM 

To the guy who wore a fully armored 
costume last Thursday to the Activities 
Carnival and Winter Expo We applaud 
you for walking across campus all-clad. 




MISS | WESTB0R0 BAPTIST CHURCH 

Fred Phelps and his cronies for making 
announcements to picket Heath Ledger's 
memorial service The plans were made 
because Ledger portrayed a gay charac- 
ter in "Brokeback Mountain" 




HIT | KSTATE VS KU 

Usually there is not much on the line 
during the Sunflower Showdown, But 
this year, that's different The teams are 
playing for the No 1 spot in the Big 12 
Conference 




MISS | SPARTANS TRUMP RAMBO 

"Meet the Spartans" beating "Rambo" 
in the box ofice this weekend Stallone is 
better than a spoof any day 



Unnecessary actions 



Authorities botch post-Katrina crime responses 




AUBREE 
CASPER 



Relief efforts - or lack 
thereof - after Hurricane 
Katrina spawned the re 
birth of 
the gov- 
ernment 
finger- 
point- 
ing game 
that now 
is respon 
sible for 
the un- 
employ- 
ment of 
at least 

six gov- 

eminent 

employees in Washington, 

DC 

Six people in an al- 
ready-corrupt city might 
seem far, far away, but 
Mayor Adrian Fenty made 
an irrational decision in re- 
sponse to the murders of 
four girls as a means of 
covering his own office and 
dodging the government in- 
efficiency bullet 

According to CNN. 
com, homeless, single 
mother Banita Jacks be- 
lieved her children "were 
possessed by demons and 
died in their sleep'' lacks. 
it seemed, murdered them 
and left their decaying bod- 
ies in her mother's home 
for at least 15 days, a crime 
with which she had been 
charged. 

However, the point is 



that within hours of find- 
ing the deceased young 
girls, each between 5 and 
16 years of age. six Wash 
ington. DC. social -welfare 
employees were fired in re- 
sponse to the quadruple 
homicide The premise for 
their dismissal. Fenty said, 
was they ignored previous 
attempts to remove the girls 
from their troubled moth- 
er's care and "other people 
didn't do their job in the 
way they're supposed to" 

Here's the catch - the 
main tip- off was a school 
nurse at the younger girls' 
school reported Jacks' sus 
pieious actions, but all she 
could give to the city social 
workers involved was that 
they lived in a van 

OK, great All city gov 
ernment social workers 
have time to go off van- 
hunting in a huge city to 
find a mom who might or 
might not be a weirdo 

Pre Katrina, this 
wouldn't have happened 

- ever Did it occur when 
the Yates children were 
found drowned 7 No How 
about when Franic New- 
ton killed her husband and 
two kids? You guessed it 

- nope In fact, the Amer- 
ican Anthropological As- 
sociation reported more 
than 200 mothers kill their 
own children each year. 
Where were city employees 



in these cases? Why didn't 
they get fired? This only 
echoes the response of na 

tional and Louisiana gov- 
ernment officials where 
Louisiana newspapers re- 
ported the finngs of doz- 
ens of government em 
ployees in response to 
unfavorable relief ef- 
forts What if Gov 
Kathleen Sebelius 
fired some Manhat- 
tan city snow -plow 
drivers after the ice 
storm last month be- 
cause they took too 
long to plow Maria- 
tt Avenue and two 
drivers died in an ac- 
cident as a result? 
There is no excuse 
for Mother Nature or 
human nature 

This isn't the 
first time anyone has 
heard of such a hor 
rific event It also 
doesn't sound like 
Fenty cares as much 
about the untime- 
ly murders of inno- 
cent young girls as 
he does about the 
reputation of his city 
agencies. 

Fearing a Hurri- 
cane Katrina -like backlash 
from more important gov- 
ernment officials should 
not leave any mayor with 
grounds for the immediate 
firing of six city workers. 




especially in Washington 
Imagine being the so- 
cial worker who was told 
bad things were happen- 
ing to children living out of 
some random van in a city 



of nearly 600,000 people - 
10,000 of which are report- 
ed as homeless according 
to the US. Census Bureau. 
I mean, really 9 Talk about 
a needle in a haystack 



Christina Fonbcro, | COLLEGIAN 



fayatot Cuff i it j htdwuii hs 

prt-joumalisiri and mass communi 
cations. He** send MM to 
ojwnromMpue. kiu. edu 



People should read to gain knowledge, gratification 




Martin Luther King | r 
Day speaker Ice T said the 
plasma TV is the No I cause 
of compla- 
cency in 
America. 
With the 
iPod, Faee 
book.com 
and You- 
Tube.com, 
it is easy 
to see how 
technology 
is in hyper 
drive BLAKE 

As a result. OSBORN 

the Unit 

ed States is 

experiencing the humiliation 

of the written word. 

Twenty -three years ago in 
his book Amusing Ourselves 
to Death," social critic Neil 
Postman observed this shift m 
history. He divided the shift 
into the age of exposition and 
the age of show business 

The former was character- 
ized by the ability of the read- 
er to think critically and ana 
lytically, because of the inven- 



THEFOURUM 

7tS J95 4444 

TheGjmpus Foin 
the Collegian's anonymous 
call m svstprr the FO II 
is edited to eliminate vulgar, 
racist, obscene and libelous 
comments The comments 
are not the opinion of the 

Collegian nor are they 
endorsed by the editorial 

I didn t know Walgree ns uipporte d Heath 

MNtt Wader down t know what the Ml 
he's talking about when he talks about 
sports. 



tion of the printing press in 
the 16th century 

The latter, starting at the 
beginning of the 20th century, 
deconstructed this age. Post- 
man claimed, with TV's Peek- 
s' Boo mentality 

According to Postman's 
book, reading enables one 
with a "tolerance for delayed 
response" 

The Peek -a- Boo mentality 
contradicts this ability because 
it pops images before readers, 
exposing them to "endless en- 
tertainment." 

In his book, Postman said 
it is not bad that there is enter 
tainment on TV, but the prob- 
lem is everything, even the 
news, is presented as enter- 
tainment 

If Postman were alive to- 
day, I wonder what he would 
call today's society Maybe he 
would call it the Age of the In- 
ternet, which appears to be 
the new medium that has unit- 
ed the world in an unprece- 
dented manner 

Thus TV, YouTube com 
and Pacebook.com each com- 



pete with the book by con- 
stantly overwhelming society 
with images The stakes are 
higher than ever for the book 
because people are more likely 
to grab the remote than grab a 
book 

With this in mind, 1 have 
a suggestion. Turn off your 
iPod, unplug the TV, pu1 
your cell phone on silent 
and go pick up a book 1 don't 
mean you have to go out and 
buy Leo Tolstoy's "War and 
Peace" or Thucydides' "Histo- 
ry of the Peloponnesian War" 

Start with something 
smaller - maybe a book you 
read in high school like "The 
Scarlett Letter" by Nathan- 
iel Hawthorne, or "The Great 
Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald 

Reading has benefits 
that cannot be obtained 
through TV According 
to Postman's book, read 
ing refines abstract think- 
ing, encourages rationality 
and rewards critical think 
ing. The eye cannot glaze 
over words as quickly as im- 
ages It musl re-read and pro 



cess what is written 

Greek dramatist Aristo- 
phenes once said, "By words, 
the mind is winged" So give 
your mind wings by reading 
words written across the ages 

Stretch your imagination 



and your mind - go pick up a 
dune 



Blake Chbom is a freshman in English. 
Please send comments to opinion *ipub 
tmedu. 




tihtJS (It 



The drunken seashells are so much be tter 
than the drunken c I arm 

Thai i about as funny as watching the girls 
on American Gladiator Classic 



i, don't interrupt me when I m 
talking to Ihe Fourum 

Hen's to seeing triple sleeping double and 
staying single 

Joha. come home Irom the bar 

totsey Children, quit being so sensltiye 
They'i* iraws Calm down 

Its been decided by the higher tips Thews 
gonna be a purple out at the KU game on 



Wednesday 

Ketsey Childress you would think that you 
being an English ma|or, would understand 
hrtirn 

I drunk dialed the fourum for the first time 
the other night My college enpenence ft 
now complete 

Is it * bad sign if I'm walking to class at 9: JO 
the first real week of school, and I'm still 
a little drunk from the night before Must 
wondering how my semester outlook is 
going trj fare 

Th« people driving carefully on campus 
should be prepared for the thousands of 
students who ha« the right of way. 



ChmtHUForttWrf 1 1 .11 I H.I* N 



Collegian 

Jonathan Gartan 

(DiionwcmtF 

Satan* Strut* | kUntUNb IMiMt 

WIN ow Wllllwnton | MANAGING EPitM 

Own Kanrwdy | NEWS EbtTM 

HinruhBUcklCOntHIEf 

Stert Orard | (Oft WW 

Annan* LmrlMt | Mutt Ml PI* !tW0« 

Sh*llaflll»| CAMPUS EPItM 

Alti Pvak | TW iw tDUM 

Irindon Statmrt | MCTRO EtHTO* 

Kaliay No*l | OPINIO* I [)IIC* 

Wandy Hiun | SPORIS f DITH 

Joal Jalllfon ISTORtStWlM 

NltcXi Johmton | SHOW SKII0« (DUO* 

tyttf *.*ynoldi | AD v»Nt. »; 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

ntwMipub.kiu.tdii 
MziHOi, Manhattan, KS66S06 

OISPLAYADS 785-SJ2-6560 

CLASSIFIED ADS 785-SJHSSS 

DELIVERY 7«5SJ2-«5S 

NEWSROOM 7M-S32-«SS6 

LETTtftS TO THE EDITQII 

The Collegian welcomes your tetters to I he 
editor They can be submitted by e-mail 
to fertersrtspu6.hu «fu, or in person to 
Kedjle 1 16. Please include youi full name, 
year in school and majoi Letters should be 
limited to JSO words. All submitted tetters 
might be edited for length and clarity 



IjusUhoked on my turkey. 

I'm calling from tawrence Wensehetpme, 
Fourum 

Apparently, there s some kind ol emergency 
at the Stun i I wonder what s going on ? 

I'M pretty sure I just ate a piece of weeper 
with my Jimmy John's 

This |us! In: teen pregnancy is funny, 

Ktttty, that s so funny I had just started a 
screenplay on an abusive fral-boy father and 
his illegitimate ugly daughter 

Kelsay, you're just (ealous You couldn't get 
knocked up if you tried 



You are cordially invited to go screw yourself 

Cooper is a phantom 

Stuni Stum Stum Stum Stunt Stum Stun! 
Slum Stum Slum 

Viking horn helmets and Jose Cuervo do 

not mi». 

frid*y night. 10 JOpm Wal Mart, aisle ). 
Honest cashier I've ever seen. 

Just in case you're wondering, I'm at lob's 
think about it 

Hty Fourum, its 2 1 5 and Daylight Donuts 
isn't open and drunk people are breaking 
into it It's kind of interesting and funny 



I wish the fourum would call me so I can 
stop wasting all my minutes. 

When M Walker made his recruiting hip 
from Cincinnati to Manhattan, he didn't take 
an airplane He |ust got a running start and 
lumped 

Hty Fourum. I just saw the scooter girl on a 
bike What is this world coming to' 

rf I made out with your neck last weekend, 
my name is Scott Call me 

H»y Fourum. I |usl saw the scooter girl on a 
bke What rt this world coming to? 

For the full Fourum, go to 
www, IntoiKolttikm .torn. 



! 



MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGES 



Ice storm, wet weather leave area soil 
unusually ideal for planting trees, plants 



By Kristin Hodges 
KANSAS STATE COUBQIAM 

Manhattan's ice storm 
still can be seen through 
the tangle of trees that were 
destroyed by strong winds, 
but the storm left behind 
more than just a mess for 
city workers It also left 
the soil with more moisture 
than it usually sees in the 
winter. 

Ward Upham, K- State 
Research and Extension 
horticulturist, said this 
year's soil conditions are 
ideal for planting trees 

"This winter has been a 
fairly wet winter," he said 
"Trees can get off to a good 
start without extra water 
ing." 

Charles harden. 

K State Research and Ex 
tension forester, said Kan 
sas is typically dry in the 
winter, but the melting of 
snow and ice helped cre- 
ate better conditions for the 
state's soil 

With the destruction 
of many trees after the ice 
storm, planting trees is ex 
actly what Manhattan res- 
idents should be thinking 



about Joshua Pease. Kan 
sas Forest Service conser- 
vation forester, said Irees 
provide windbreaks that 
benefit all parts of life, in 
eluding protection for live- 
stock in the winter, habitats 
for wildlife, protection for 
crops and the prevention of 
road-covering snow drifts 

Windbreaks also slow 
the wind down and reduce 
the evaporation of moisture 
from the soil 

After December's ice 
storm, many of the trees 
across Kansas were demol- 
ished and the amount of 
windbreaks were reduced 
across the state. This does 
not help the already low 
number of windbreaks in 
Kansas. Pease said 

"The windbreaks - 
they're really in decline 
across Kansas." Pease said 
"It's not just a western Kan- 
sas thing It pretty much 
stretches from one border 
to another. It's really some- 
thing we need to take seri 
ous." 

Windbreaks need to 
be maintained by renovat- 
ing old trees and replacing 
those that are destroyed in 



storms. Pease said. 

"If you think back to 
the days of the Dust Bowl 
era, we had a sincere lack of 
trees." he said "There was a 
tremendous amount of soil 
loss Those trees helped re- 
duce all that 

"We just don't want to 
get back into that sort of 
situation The severe storms 
still occur That's why we 
need to get those back m 
shape - to conserve soil, 
reduce erosion and it's bet 
ter for the crops" 

Though the actual act 
of planting trees is not pop- 
ular right now. Pease said it 
is something people should 
be thinking about for the 
months ahead. 

Upham said trees can 
be planted throughout the 
year, though spring is the 
traditional time, because 
plants put out plenty of 
roots and can get estab- 
lished in the ground quick- 
ly. 

Harden said the best 

time of year to plant trees is 
during early spring, starting 
in March 

"The best thing to do 
for trees is to have the soil 



well prepared and good 
weed control," he said. "A 
mistake is to plant the trees 
and then not check on them 
for months" 

Barden said it is impor 
tant to control the weeds 
for the first year or two of 
the tree's growth, especial- 
ly during the summertime 
when weeds are at their 
highest. 

Upham said this time 
of year people can start 
planning the types of trees 
to plant and their place- 
ment. 

The Kansas Forest Ser 
vice Web site has a list of 
deciduous trees it recom- 
mends for windbreaks 

It categorizes the spe- 
cies of trees into areas of 
the state that they should 
be grown. 

The bur oak. hackber- 
ry, honey locust, laccbark 
elm and Russian mulberry 
are all listed as adaptable 
to the eastern, central and 
western thirds of the stale. 

As the site recom- 
mends, planters should 
consider soil characteris- 
tics to make the final deci- 
sion of the species 




The tie Montis 
provided the 
best dftermath 
for planting 
trees The 
board tied to 
t be tree help* 
tor straight 
growth and 
stability 



Joilyn Brown 

ii'ISI' IAN 



ROTC cadets learn to communicate effectively on the battle field 



By Rebecca Ptrez 
KANSAS STATE COLLEUIAN 

FORT RILEY- Most stu 
dents take communication 
for granted They have cell 
phones, e-mail, Facebook com 
and MySpace.com to keep in 
touch with friends and fami- 
ly K State's Army ROTC stu- 
dents teamed communication 
on the battle field is not nearly 
as easy. 

The ROTC students spent 
Saturday morning at Fort Ri- 
ley's Close Combat Tacti- 
cal Training center operating 
Bradley fighting vehicles and 
Abrams tanks simulators 

While learning how to op- 



erate the vehicles and fire the 
weapons is important, it is the 
communication skills that the 
cadets team while performing 
the mission that is the point of 
the exercise 

The mission was set at the 
National Training Center in 
Fort Irwin, Calif Cadets were 
around in a basin surround- 
ed by mountains and had lo 
traverse the terrain through a 
narrow gap between mountain 
ranges. 

The goal was to stay in 
a formation that looks like a 
piece of pie called a wedge for- 
mation When they got to the 
narrow pass they were sup- 
posed to move closer to each 



other, but keep the same for- 
mation 

The cadets entered their 
simulators at about 10 am 
and spent the next 30 minutes 
working out real-life commu- 
nication issues on the radios 

Cadet Aaron Scherffius. 
senior in construction science 
and management and the bat- 
tle commander, said the most 
frustrating pan was getting ev- 
eryone on their proper chan- 
nels and talking to each other 

It was only an hour from 
when Ihe mission finally start- 
ed to the end of the mission, 
but in that hour their commu- 
nication improved 

Lt. Col. George Belin. 



professor of military science, 

told Ihe cadets they went from 
giving directions in terms of 
left and right to using cardi 
nal directions. They also im 
proved Iheir ability lo keep 
the platoons together by tell 
ing vehicles tu drive at spculii 
speeds instead of saying faster 
or slower 

Belin and Lt Col Curl 
Slick, assistant professor ol 
military science, commended 
the cadets on their outstand 
ing performance 

"Once you got off [from 
the starting point], comtuum 
cation was really pretty good 
between the platoons and the 
company commander," Belin 



said to all ihe cadets 

Belin explained to the H 
dels thai Communication is 
more important lhan anvihing 
else on the battle field. 

As a leader, the focus is 
not fighting the enemy, n is 
DHking sure yuur platoon and 
company is Eunctioninj 
their highest potential, Helm 
said. 

rhat'i «h\ communica- 
tion is re idly Critical, M 
can see and understand WB*1 
the battle field looks like Im 
everybody in your platoon k 
you can best maneuver them 
and put them in a position lo 
kill Ihe enemy, Relin said 

After a quick debriefing of 



the mission. Belin called one 
of Ihe Lode's in read the lop 
tiuoles Iron; the mtuiotl that 
BWpUiveii poor ctittimunlcfl 
lion 

The. communlwiion was 

really good, so there 
quote* tins time" I 

Scherflitis said 

Some of II- moil mtiri 

n I able quotes WCT* No V 1 

ihink there is tomeofK shoot 
ing at us, yeah, I'm pretty sure 
they're shooting si m; no 4 

Hello does BnyoiM remem- 
ber the button you push to 
.-ler and No 1 I have no 
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I'm pterin at right m 

front of mo" 



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PAGE 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Perfection 



MONDAY, JANUARY 28,2008 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 



Men dominate Cyclones for most of game, Women take down 
share undefeated top Big 1 2 spot with KU another ranked team 



By Wendy H»un 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 
I 

With 10 minutes 38 seconds left 
in the game, the entirety of Bramlagc 
Coliseum knew whose house it was. 
And they chanted his name - Michael 
Beasley. 

Freshman forward Beasley" s 33- 
point performance was his seventh 
30-point game this season, tying the 
record held by Bob Boozer (1958 59) 
and Norris Coleman (1985 86) for 
30-point games in a season 

He also grabbed 15 rebounds, 
which is not only his highest total in 
conference play this, but also cata- 
pulted him into second-place for most 
double doubles in a season To take 
the record from 1961's Larry Comley, 
he will need two more to tie and three 
to take it out-right 

"Everybody who has played us 
in the last 10 games has gone out of 
their way to make it hard for him," 
coach Prank Martin said. "Earlier in 
the year, we didn't understand how 
to play when teams made it hard for 
him. Now he's getting a better under- 
standing of getting double- and triple 
teamed by college players who are 
bigger and stronger than he is and the 
rest of our guys have a better under 
standing of what to do" 

K Slate (14-4. 4-0 Big 12 Con- 
ference) was carried by Beasley to a 
dominating 82-57 victory over Iowa 
State (12-8, 2-3 Big 12) 

Freshman guard Jacob Pullen, 
who had 13, freshman forward Bill 
Walker, who had 10, and junior for- 
ward Darren Kent, who had 1 1, also 
scored in double-figures for the Wild- 
cats, 

Kent's performance served as the 
game's surprise. He was perfect from 
beyond the arc, sinking three three - 
point shots. 

"Darren's a young man that what 
he brings to our basketball team is 
that skill level," Martin said "He gives 
us another guy in there who can catch 
and pass, and he makes it difficult for 
people because he can shoot the bas- 
ketball He's got confidence about 
what we're all about and what he's all 
about and he's playing that way" 

K State got off to a sluggish start. 
scoring first on a three- point-shot 
from Walker, but then stalled until the 
offense kick-started at the 12-minute 
mark, when Beasley nailed a jumper 
to make it 116. 

K-State then went on a 11-4 scor- 
ing tear that ended with a three- point- 
shot from Beasley to take K State to 
an 11 -point lead Beasley described 
the first stretch of the game as unac- 
ceptable 

"We came out lackadaisical," 
he said. "We came out like wc were 
just going to win, but we picked it up 
through the course of the game and 




Jonathan Knight | (Oil H.IAN 

Freshman forward Mich** I Beasley makes a jump shot over Iowa State's Craig 
Brackins Beasley had 13 points in the 82-5? victory 



just did what we had to do." 

Although K-State only shot 21 
percent (rom the field in the first 10 
minutes of the half, they were able to 
get back up to 40 percent from the 
field at the end of the half, including 
50 percent from beyond the arc, 

Iowa Stale shot poorly through- 
out the game The Cyclones shot 36 
percent in the first half and 31 per- 
cent in the second half and only con- 
verted nine three-point-shots in the 
duration of the game 

They were led in scoring by soph- 
omore guard Wesley lohnson. who 
had 20 points, and freshman forward 
Craig Braekins, who had 10 points 
Their leading rebound er was senior 
center I in Hubalek. who had eight 
boards 



"I didn't like our effort," said 
Iowa Slate coach Greg Mc Dennett 
"I thought at times we were selfish 
and for the most part, showed little 
passion That can't be what we are 
about" 

Martin said although it might 
have looked like the team looked past 
Iowa Stale tu Wednesday's matchup 
with Kansas, the team must be com 
plctely focused on the next game 

"Anytime you compete for a 
championship, the next game on 
your schedule is the biggest game of 
the year." he said. "As long as you ap- 
proach it that way, you have a chance 
We were pretty good about approach- 
ing it that way. This conference is a 
monster - it's absurd how difficult it 
is to win in this conference," 




Joilyn Brown | COLLEGIAN 

Senior guard Klmbtrly Otttt goes in for a score against 
Colorado. Dietz had 20 points in a 68-63 victory Sunday 
against Oklahoma State. 

By Joe) Wilson 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

STILLWATER, Okla. - When K-State needed a lead- 
er and someone to step up Sunday against Oklahoma 
State, it was senior guard Kimbcrly Dietz who took center 
stage for the Wildcats. 

After scoring 20 points, all in the second half, Dietz 
led No 22 K State (14-5, 6-0 Big 12 Conference) to its 
ninth -straight win, edging the No 14 Cowgirls 68-63 al 
Gallagher- Iba Arena 

U is Ihe best start for K-State since the inception of 
ihe Big 12, however, the Wildcats started 8 Ihree times 
dunng their slint in the Big Eight Conference. They are 
lied with Baylor for first place in the Big 12 

Oklahoma State (16-3, 4-2 Big 12) contained Dietz 
in the first half sending the Wildcats' leading scorer to the 
locker room with zero points With 15:20 left in the game 
and K State trailing 37-30. Dietz put up her first points 
when she hit a three pointer. 

Less than a minute later, Dietz hit another three 
pointer to cut the Cowgirls lead to 37-36 

"1 was just tired of being down and my teammates 
were running our offense so well at that time, and it was 
just an open look," Dietz said. 

What ensued was a 15-2 run by K-State with nine 
points, all three pointers, from Dietz and six points from 
junior guard Shalee Lehning to give the Wildcats a 45-39 
advantage with 1 1 :28 left in the game 

"This is obviously a tale of two halves," said K-State 
coach Deb Patterson "I don't think we felt at halftime 
we were as efficient and effective as we were capable of 

Sm WOMEN'S BASKETBALL, Paqe 10 



TRACK ft FIELD 



Women lead team, Big 12 to victory 
over Mountain West Conference 




By Joel Aschbrtnner 

KANSAS STATb LDLLfcGIAN 

K State's track and field 
team helped lead the Big 
12 Conference to a victo- 
ry over the 
Mountain 
West Con- 
ference in 
the Confer 
ence Chal- 
lenge on 
Saturday 
in Lincoln, 
Neb 

The BONDS 

Wildcats 
were joined 

by Missouri and Nebras- 
ka to represent the Big 12 
against Air Force, Brigham 
Young and Colorado State 
of the Mountain West 
The Big 12 outscored the 
Mountain West 224 145 in 
the dual meet The Wild- 
cat women led al! schools, 
scoring 53 points. 

"On the women's side, 
there were a lot of good 
performances." said track 
and field coach Cliff Rove] 
to. "There were a significant 
number of personal bests 
Across the board in gener- 
al the girls competed really 



well" 

The women notched 
seven event victories, as 
well as three one-two finish- 
es In the weight throw, ju- 
nior Loren Groves and se- 
nior Lad Heller had throws 
of 67 -00.50 and 65-01.25, 
respectively, lo place first 
and second 

In both ihe 60-meter and 
the 200-meter races, soph- 
omore Donniece Parrish 
edged out senior Marnyka 
Honeycutt to give the Wild- 
cats and the Big 12 one two 
finishes Parrish and Honey- 
cutt posted times of 761 and 
7.67 in the 60-meter race 
and 24 24 and 24 86 in the 
200- meter race, respective- 
ly 

Parrish and Honey- 
cutt also were on winning 
the 4x400-meter-relay team, 
along with senior Morgan 
Bonds and freshman Tiara 
Walpool. Bonds also won 
the 600-yard run with a time 
of 1:22 46 Junior Lauren 
Fisher posted a time of 57.7 1 
to win the 400-meter Senior 
Thomaida Polydorou's triple 
jump of 12 35 meters gave 
the Wildcats another victo- 
ry 

The men were not as 



successful in the meet, only 
scoring nine points The 
lone victory came from 
sophomore Sam lames in 
the 800 -meter, with a time 
of I 5181 

Rovelto said several 
of the men's performanc- 
es would not show because 
they are decathletes and do 
not specialize in one event. 
There were athletes, howev- 
er, who impressed him 

"There were a few guys 
that had great meets," Rovel- 
to said "Mike Myer ran re 
ally well in the 200 The 60 
was also a solid race for him. 
Sam [)ames|, in the 800, ran 
very well. Colin [Swaney], 
in the mile, ran well. 

Myer placed second in 
ihe 200-meter and third in 
the 60-meter Swaney came 
in fourth in the mile 

The men also had sev- 
eral athletes who did not 
compete in their best event 
Scott Sellers, 2007 NCAA 
outdoor high jump cham- 
pion, competed in the long 
jump and triple jump, plac- 
ing third in both 

Rovelto said he per 
formed well considering thai 
he was not competing in his 
best event 



Super Bowl features rematch, shows 
versatility of players on both sides 




TYLER 
SHARP 



The rematch has arrived. A 
mere six weeks after taking ihe 
New Bng- 
land I'atriots 
to the wire, 
in a game 
watched by 
about 25 
million peo- 
pie accord- 
ing to the 
Nielsen TV 
ratings, the 
New York 
Giants will 
get another 
shot at ruining 
the Patriots' dream season 

The saga of the Patri- 
ots season while being histor 
ic also has been tumultuous. 
Coach Bill Belichcck was fined 
$500,000 and the team was 
fined $250,000 and tost their 
2008 first round draft pick for 
stealing signals in a Week One 
victory over the New York |ets 
Wide receiver Randy Moss. 
who was thought to have re- 
vived his troubled career with 
the Patriots, had a restrain 
ing order placed against him 
on Jan. 6 by a Florida wom- 
an Moss will miss preliminary 
hearings today as he practic- 
es with the team in preparation 
lor Super Bowl XLI1, al 5 30 
p.m. Sunday from the Universi- 



ty of Phoenix Stadium in Glen- 
dale, Ariz 

Even with ihose events in 
mind, the historical implica- 
tions of this game are obvious- 
ly monumental. After their ini- 
ti.il victory over the Giants on 
Dec 29. the Patriots look care 
of the Jacksonville jaguars and 
topped the San Diego Char- 
ge rs 

The Patriots' undefeat 
ed record has not been the 
only mark broken this sea- 
si m When Tom Brady and 
Moss connected for a four-yard 
touchdown in the second quar- 
ter it ihe Giants game, the duo 
each tied their own respec 
five records Moss equaled Jer- 
ry Rice's record for receiving 
touchdowns in a season with 
22 and Brady tied Peyton Man 
ning's record for passing touch- 
downs in a season with 49. The 
touchdown strike also helped 
the Patriots eclipse the NFL re- 
cord for points scored in a sea- 
son with 589. eclipsing a nine- 
year old mark by the Minneso- 
ta Vikings. 

It would be easy to dimin- 
ish the value of the New York 
Giants season in which Eli 
Manning has established him- 
self as a quarterback of the fu- 
ture Tom Coughlin captured 
these emotions with hb com 



ments in a Saturday chat tran- 
script at www.Giantscom. 

"Eli, he is playing very 
well and he is very focused;' he 
said. "He has been very accu- 
rate, played through al! kinds 
of weather and really has been 
able to slay right on course the 
entire lime" 

The Giants defense has 
also been stout this year led by 
the perennial presence ol de- 
fensive end Michael Strahan 
and the team's only Pro Bowl 
selection in fellow defensive 
end Osi Umenyiora This all 
was impressive for a team that 
stumbled lo an 0-2 start, and 
looked to be well on their way 
to a hard season before ending 
the year on a 13- 1 slreak. 

Since the Patriots 38-35 
win over the Giants, the an 
ticipalion tor a rematch grew 
with each team's progression 
through the playoffs With 
Tom Brady no longer sport- 
ing a boot on his right foot and 
the Giants ready for their new 
opportunity to ruin the Patri 
ots' perfect season, Super Bowl 
XLI! promises to be a wild 
ride 



Tyler Sharp it i sophomore in print 
journalism and political mm nee. Pleas* 
send comments to iports m iputi Jhi, etfu . 



PAGE 7 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MONDAY, JANUARY 28. 2008 



For all sizes 




Zotcis $10 




Zotcli (available in an assortment of coloril 




KryitaHo'i SS6 by Tulle 



Different outfits fit variety of female body shapes 



By Monica Castro 

KANSAS MAI t UHlElilAN 

Shopping can be difficult when women do 
not know how to find clothes that compliment 
their body shapes But shopping can be made 
easy if women follow guidelines about what 
styles work best for their body types. 

"The biggest thing is when girls come to 
the store and they locus on sizes," said Sara 
Meyer, owner of Zolcis Attire "Size is impor 
tant, but ihey should not have that mindset 
and find clothing that fits well " 

Meyer said there are many styles women 
can wear to make them appear thinner, which 
includes wearing dark-denim jeans and belts 
around the waist Belts around the waist ap 
pear to make the waist line smaller, she said, 

Meyer said she thinks dark denim is the 
best type of materiel because it works for ev 
erybodys shape and is overall slimming and 
stylish. 



Petite Women who are petite and want to 
elongate themselves should consider wearing 
heels. Meyer said Petite women also should 
wear more form-fitting clothing because their 
body frames are smaller and clothing won't be 
too baggy or loose fitting. Meyer said many pe- 
tite women can wear longer tops that hit the 
waist area. She also said cropped jackets are a 
good way to elongate the body since the cut is 
shorter Pointy heels help give a smaller wom- 
en some height and also can make her look 
thinner. 

Tall: Taller women can pull off skinny jeans, 
Meyer said. Wearing dresses on top of jeans 
works with women who are taller because it 
does not create a baggy look for them She 
said if taller women do wear dresses the length 
should be to the knee or below. Women who 
arc taller should try to wear rounded-toe heels 
because it helps them look a bit shorter, she 
said 

Curvy Women with curves, Meyer said, should 
try to wear V-neck tops because it shows some 
skin and still looks nice Wrap tops with a 
camisole on the bottom are good because they 
create a more slimming look on the torso or 



waist area. Meyer said boot-cut jeans are ideal 
fur women who are curvy because it creates a 
slimming look Also, high-rise jeans work well 
for more curvy women because they help keep 
the sides of your body from sticking out, Mey- 
er said. 

Hourglass body Wide leg jeans are nice be 
cause Ihey take away from the hip area and 
make it more proportional, Meyer said. Since 
people with hourglass figures are smaller on 
bottom, babydoll tops are nice because they 
hide the stomach area and emphasize the 
smaller top of your body, she said Meyer also 
said empire waist shirts are nice for hourglass 
figures. Meyer said a strapless dress is nice be- 
cause it also shows off the small top of the 
body and does not enhance the bottom half, 
Meyer said. 

Meyer said belts are in slyle right now, 
but she also said she warns women that they 
should be careful how they wear them Bell 
placement should depend on a woman's torso 
or bust size 

Meyer said women should wear a belt on 
their waist if they have a long torso because it 
makes the rest of the body look proportional. 
If women have a larger bust, belts under the 
bust line do not work because it will make the 
area look larger, she said 

Bonnie Bailey, sophomore in apparel and 
textiles, said leggings are popular but might 
look better on taller women because most leg- 
gings hit mid -calf. 

"A lot of people with different body styles 
can pull leggings off. you just have to know 
when to wear them and what to wear them 
with," Bailey said. 

Lindsay Berry, Krystallos Inc. employee, 
said tunics, empire waist lops and shirt dresses 
are among the popular items at Krystallos. 

Berry, sophomore in prc-professional ele- 
mentary education, said there are many items 
that create more slimming looks, but shoppers 
have to try them on to see if they look right 
and feel comfortable on their body types. 

"It is important for women to find clothes 
that complement their body shape because, 
not only will the clothes fit, but women will 
feel better aboul themselves if the clothing fits 
right," she said 




Zotcis $55 




II \ 
Krystallos $68 by Modal 




Zotcis $49 




Zotd* S i9 



Zotcis 



Krystallos 

Photos by Jostyn Brown 



Sex and the City: The Little Apple 

Lighter attitude toward dating could lower stress, open avenues for other interests, needs 




I weigh 1 13 pounds, and 
I'm on a diet - a relationship 
diet. 

V e p , 
just short of 
my designat- 
ed weight 
class, I plan 
to skinny 
up with any 
other self- in- 
dulged wom- 
en of Man- 
hattan and 
show this 
campus that 
I am one singular sensation 

And singletons of the Little 
Apple, we truly aren't alone 

According to a recent US 
Census Bureau report, more 
than half - 51 percent - of men 
and women live without a wife 



ANNETTE 
LAWLESS 



or husband, freeing themselves 
from over the top relationship 
drama and fights about who 
eats the best junk food in the 
cupboard 

Yet, among the halls of our 
purple clad university. I can't 
help but feel cheated As a sin- 
gle woman among K StuiiS 
23.000. it's hard not to cttdi 
the glimpse of someone's affec 
in in to another A kiss, a hand- 
hold - sometimes 1 just want 
to vomit. 

Not that my anti-signifi- 
cant other tactics get the best 
of me. but a lot of people put 
vigor behind the sport of rela- 
tionships. And it seems like the 
game might end before they 
can reach the pom-pom glo- 
ry of their boy meets -girl half 
time show 



Dating dieting is the new 
Zone of 2008, where being sin- 
gle is as lusty as strappy Mi 
chad Antonio stilettos - and 
where having a boyfriend is 
truly the fad of relationships" 

Though many 20 year olds 
prefer to lie themselves down 
uhh a relationship and hope 
lor one endearing happily ever 
after, it's equally important to 
he comfortable with yourself 
beyond the boyfriends. 

This new year is about 
erasing stigma behind being 
single and embracing the free- 
dom i if the sexually explorative 
time known as your 20s. By ac- 
cepting your single self, you're 
likely to appreciate more of 
what you have to offer - to the 
world, not to one person 



No man or woman should 
tie anyone down in this carefree 
time of our lives We shouldn't 
have to stress about being the 
perfect homemaker or saying 
the perfect "I love you." Among 
our work, club meetings and 
12 credit hour lives, we have 
enough anxiety to make the 
grade Will a high relationship 
rating satisfy our goals much 
more? 

To live a college life with- 
out pressure might seem im- 
possible, but it's quite attain- 
able when it comes to relation- 
ships This year, think more 
about pleasing yourself rath- 
er than someone else Some 
one should care aboul you, and 
if you're not going to do it, no- 
body else will. 

As a resolution to lighten 



my relationship load for 2008, 
I plan to sirup onto the dating 
scene with a lighter attitude, a 
lighter load and a lighter heart 
It's important In take only what 
you can handle, whether it's 
sniiifihing behind the books 
or between the sheets By light- 
ening my relationship load. 1 
might just enlighten myself to 
finding that perfect something I 
need this year - relationship or 
ni it And for just about anyone, 
a carb light men -light world 
might be the right step to satis- 
faction 



Annette lawless is a fifth year senior n 
electronic journalism, print journalism 
and public relations. Pteas* tend com 
ments to ed$e 'tptib, km.edu. 







WEEKLY HOROSCOPE 



AQUARIUS 

(tan ;i Feti 19) 

Female colleagues might 
be able to help you gel 
the job done Don't be too quick to judge 
your loved ones Accept the inevitable and 
continue to do your job Someone you least 
e«ped man not haw youi best interests at 
heart 

PISCES 

(Feb 20 March 20] 

Don t hesitate to voice your 
opinions at * g roup meet 
ing: howevei, keep your thoughts to yourself 
at home It you put your mind to it. you could 
entertain or hot! a multitude of social events 
Rewards for past good deeds will highlight 
your day Some situations might be blown 
out of proportion 

ARIES 

(March 21 April 20] 

Rewards, gifts or money 
horn investments of ta*es 
can be e» petted You always seem to spend 
more than you make If you can, try In work 
out ot your home this week Your partner will 
blow situation* out ot proportion 

TAURUS 

(April 21 May 211 

YouriommumcalionskilH 
might win you points 
try to satisfy both ol your needs Keep an 
open mind when listening to the opinions 
of others Your versatile rrand and common 
sens* will allow you 10 come up with various 
solutions 

GEMINI 

(May 22 June 21) 

Socially you need a 
last-paced form ol enter- 
tainment, tiavel will be fun and entertaining 
Sit back Your trendy style and umgue way ol 
doing things will entice new acquaintances. 

CANCER 

(June 22 - July 221 

Von can open up to your 
mate and let them know 
What you eipect out of this relationship 
Don't get into heated discussions, lake tme 
to deai with the concerns of children Tiavel 
will promote romantic connections 

LEO 

(July 2J Aug 22) 

Be confident in your 
endeavors and others will 
believe in your efforts Oder consolation, but 
don't give them any dined ion Try to avoid 
turn ttons that wilt hnng you m contact with 
those yon find difficult to get along with 
T hi s da y was meant for love Make < reative 
changes to your residence 

M VIRGO 

11^ (Aug 21 Sept .231 

Deal with the needs of 
children and get into 
groups that deal with self awareness Be 

/.hen dealing with female members 
of your family Your home might be in an 
uproar and you ate best to stay out of the 
line of tire il at all possible Any attractions 
toward clients will be on* sided and must be 
pui right out ol your head 

LIBRA 

. (Sept 24 Oct. Ill 

¥ ^k B* careful of disclosing 
^^m personal ml or mation 
You might overspend if you travel this wee*; 
however the mp will be one to remember 
Partnerships could be tense Don't push your 
luck. You need to spend some time pamper 
ing yourself 







SCORPIO 

lOrt 2* Nov 22) 




\ » ^^ You should visit a friend or 
^ — ^"^ relative who hasnt been 
well Don t overspend to impress others You 
might wmt to take a serious look at your 
goals and objectives You will be a bil of a 
spendthrift this week 

SAGITTARIUS 

(Nov 23 Dec 21] 

tinier tain ties about your 
living arrangements might 
be unnerving It might be best to spend trme 
fining up youi premises and making changes 
that will he appreciated You Should vwt a 
friend or relative who hasn't been well You 
' an make progress if you deal with the right 
individuals 

CAPRICORN 

(Dec 22 Jan. 201 

Youndeascanbeput 
into action You might be 
overly emotional when dealing with your 
partner Avoid (unctions that will bring you 
in contact with those you find difficult to get 
along with You will be highly entertaining 
when in contact with your lover 

— vm#dstrok>qy ontmtxom 




mam 



hMM 



m 



PAGE 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2008 



The Little Mermaid show 
performs in Manhattan 



FROM THE ARCHIVES 



By Sarah Burford 
KANSAS STATE COLUlilAN 

When people think of "The 
Little Mermaid," they probably 
don't picture a cowboy starfish, 
an arrogant Prince Charming 
and a herd of kindergartners 
dressed as seahorses, 

Bui the Manhattan Arts 
Center production of "The Lit- 
tle Mermaid" broke all the rules 
with its cast of Manhattan area 
children ages 5 to 18 

The Missoula Children's 
Theatre presented the show 
along with the MACademy 
Youth Theatre, according to the 
show's program. The Missoula 
Children's Theatre conducted 
auditions for the show in Man- 
hattan one week prior to the 
performance on Saturday, said 
ID Henriksen. Missoula Chil- 
dren's Theatre director. 

"The goal isn't to teach 
theater,' Henriksen said, "tt's to 
leach life lessons through the- 
ater 

The Missoula Children's 
theatre has taken its show to 
1.2 1 W communities in all SO 
stales, to two Canadian prov- 
inces and to 16 different court - 
irics More than 65,000 young 
people have participated as 
performers in the theater, ac- 
cording to the show's program. 

"The Little Mermaid" pro- 
duction in Manhattan put a 
twist on the usual story of Ari- 
el and her Prince Charming In 
tins, version, a merman, played 
by Henriksen. lets his four love- 
ly daughters visit "the world 
above" on their 16th birthdays. 
I he youngest daughter, Celia, 
played by Ada Davis-Nouri. 
falls in love with the arrogant 
Prince Perfect [as do her sis- 
ters | on her trip to the human 



world. But her " Flounder- 
like friend. Gil. played by |ack 
Hubler- Dayton, is vying for her 
attention in the water-world 

Oblivious to Gil's crush 
on her, Celia asks the cowboy 
starfish to give her legs so she 
can dance at the Prince's par 
ty and win his heart. But when 
the Prince picks her to be his 
bride and suggests they cele 
brate with a fish fry, Celia re- 
turns to her family's welcoming 
arms 

The children's roles ranged 
from 5 -year-old seahors 
es, to town criers, to a dragon 
manned by six kids, to potential 
princesses for Prince Perfect. Ir- 
idescent fabric and cool colors 
turned the stage into a home 
for mer-people 

Rachel Gorman, soph; 
omore at Manhattan High" 
School, played one of Celia s 
sisters She said being in the 
show with her friends was great 
overall, and she is always look- 
ing for new opportunities to 
act Gorman said she enjoys 
working with young casts, and 
has had experience acting with 
the Christian Youth Theater in 
Kansas City, Kan 

"Musicals with little kids 
are just so fun," she said. "Little 
kids are really free and you can 
just goof around and not worry 
about expectations." 

Uwe Thumm, an audience 
member and father of two cast 
members, said the show was 
well done, well choreographed, 
and had nice costumes 

"jThe directors] made sure 
the kids were exposed," he said 
"It wasn't dominated by adult 
actors; it was nice guidance" 

Henriksen said he loves 
directing kids who have never 
been on stage. 



Students help to raise funds for university, 
own colleges through Telefund for 28 years 



ByEllMPodrujsJry 
KANSAS IBD t UM-LMxIAN 

Sunday marked the start 

of the JHih annual K-State 
Telefund - a university- wide 
campaign that collects dona- 
lions from alumni to benefit 
each academic college. 

Since its start in 1980, Tele 
fund has raised more than S21 
million for the university. Stu- 
dent volunteers now work the 
phone lines with hopes of win- 
ning several prizes, which have 
included cars, electric scooters 
and more than $2,000 in schol- 
arships in pervious years. 

The following article is 
from the Feb 21, 1980, Col- 
legian. Read on and find out 
more about the first Telefund. 

KSU COLLEGES LOOK FOR 
FUNDS WITH NATIONWIDE 
TELEFUND DRIVE 

Bv Janice Snyder 

Thirty thousand alumni 
will be contacted in March and 
April as the Colleges of Agri- 
culturc, Engineering and Arts 
and Sciences conduct "Tele 
fund," a telephone campaign to 
raise money for the individual 
colleges 

A goal of $25,000 per col- 
lege has been set for the Tele- 
fund campaigns Between 300 
and 500 K State students will 
contact alumni throughout lhc 
United States 

The College of Agricul- 
ture Telefund will begin March 
30 and end April 14, while the 
College of Engineering Tele- 
fund will be April 15-28. The 
College of Arts and Sciem 
es Telefund will be conducted 




each weekend in April 

In recent years universities 
have needed more private sup- 
port because stale appropria 
lions and student fees are not 
enough for the extras of educa- 
tion, said Mark Moore, direc 
tor of giving for the KSU Foun- 
dation 

Telefund will try to make 
up (or the discrepancy and 
help provide scholarships, lab- 
oratory and classroom equip- 
ment and more income for stu- 
dent activities. Moore said He 
also said the main emphasis 
will be on scholarships 

This year the event is going 
national. In the past the fund 
raising has been limited to Ri- 
ley County, said David Mugler, 
associate dean for the College 
of Agriculture and chairman of 
the agriculture Telefund. 

Moore said a successful 
mailing campaign was utilized 
last fall. 

"In November, we put to- 
gether a mailing campaign." 



Moore said "We got togeth- 
er with the deans in each col- 
lege and pui together individu- 
al mailings to send to alumni to 
show what was taking place in 
each college and ask for contri- 
butions" 

Moore said Telefund is 
different from past universi- 
ty fund-raising events, which 
were directed toward all alum- 
ni This fundraiser is aimed at 
alumni from specific colleges 
who have never contributed. 

"The best way to gel in 
touch with them is to call and 
talk with them," he said "In 
this sense both the caller and 
the alumni will have something 
in common - their college." 

Telefund will last for three 
hours each night using the uni- 
versity's wait line Students, 
faculty and area alumni vol- 
unteers will man 15 phones 
in the K-Statc Student Union. 
Each caller will contact 25 to 
30 alumni a night. 

The callers will be given 



Students 

employed 

under 

K-State's 

work-study 

program 

spent 

more than 

200 hours 

looking 

uplS.OOO 

Kansas 

telephone 

numbers 

for the first 

Telefund. 

UNIVERSITY 
ARCHIVES 
PILE PHOTO 



a sample conversation, infor- 
mation pertaining to their col- 
lege and pledge cards. Moore 
said students employed by the 
work study program are now 
in the process of going through 
phone books from other cities 
in the United States to look up 
alumni. 

However, they have found 
most of the alumni arc still in 
Kansas, Moore said 

Presently, chairs of the 
colleges are coordinating the 
teams and looking for student 
captains. Moore said. The stu 
dent captains will be responsi 
ble partly to recruit volunteers 
and make sure they show up 

He added the volunteer 
callers have a chance to win 
prizes. Expense-pair weekends 
to Worlds ol Fun, Tiffany's At- 
tic and Crown Center in Kan 
sas City, Mo,, will be given to 
those callers with the molt 
pledges. Dinner passes to local 
restaurants also will be award- 
ed 



St. Petersburg Battel Theatre 



Kansas State University 



cs& 



January 31 at 7:30 p.m. 

McCain Conversation with David Oitington 

Room 201 McCain at 6:30 p.m. 



» 



I 



Performance Series joot-os 



For Tickets Call McCain Box Office: 

785-5 12-6428 Mon-Fri: 11 -5pm 
For More Info or Buy Online: 

www.k-s1ale.efl u/mrcain 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 




Bulletin Board 



BRANO NEW luxury span 
moms close to campus 
Granite eountertops clam, 
lass appliances. washer. 1 
dryer, pool, hot tub. gym 
business cantst theater 
785 537.2096 collegia! 
evil la com 



LEARN TO FLY' K-State EXCELLENT FOUR-BED 
F tying Club luxe five an WKJM m Aggleville 




planes and lowest 
Call 785 776-1 744. 
ksu edukslc 




MANHATTAN CITV Ordi- 
nance 4fll4 assures ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity in housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count ot race, sex, famil- 
ial status, military its 
'us, disability, religion, 
age, color, national ori- 
gin or ancestry. Viola- 
tion* should be re- 
ported to the Director ot 
Human Resources at 
City Hall, 785-587-2440 

EXCELLENT ONE-BED 
ROOM June i $600 in- 
cludes washer dryer, stor- 
age, periling utilities. In- 
ternet cable jarwtrey (S - 
' ■ rM r 785-341-4275 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 assures ev- 
ery person equal oppor- 
tunity in housing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count ot race, s*jt. femll- 
ml statu*, military ata- 
lua, disability, religion, 
age. color, national ori- 
gin or ancestry. Viola- 
tions should be re- 
ported lo I he Director of 
Human Resources at 
City Kail. 785 587 2440 



$1500 August i Want a 
great view ot Aggiev.lie 
with shopping, services. 
KSU at your fingertip*? 
Call looayi 785 320 8300 

NEWER 1844 Anderson 
three-bedroom two bath 
room, personal washer' 
dryer, one hall block west 
of KSU available August 
1st $9607 month 785 
4 to- 1865 

NEWLY REMODELED 
8»3 and 917 Vattter. iwo- 
bedroom, one bathroom 
personal washer/ dryer 
Three blocks east at KSU 
available June and Au- 
gull $820/ month. 785 
4 to- 1885 

ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartments in new build 
rngs Close to campus 
and Aggreville Available 
June and August 2008 
No pets Can John al 785- 
3'3-7473 

THREE-BEDROOM 
JUNE/ Augusi leases 
One block to campus/ Ag- 
gieviHe Central air lull 
kitchens, washer/ dryer on 
sile 7B5 539 464 1 

TWO-BEDROOM. 
CLOSE to campus 
Washer and dryer $680 
per month 785-341-4496 

TWO-BEDROOM TWO 

bathroom a part mem two 
blocks (ram cam- 
pual Very nice new con 
struct ion Inexpensive util- 
ities Will lease quickly 1 
Sorry, no pets Contact 
Amber si 785-313 1807 
ot a rachaeSgmall com 



Open Saturday 10-3 

537-9064 

»■« niH.rwianiwtia 1 com 
IS] 




Doea 

your 
roommate 

BITE? 



Stat i checking 

Let's 



Spacious 
Duplexes 



Each duple) features 

walk -in closets, 

all kite hen appliances. 

wash erf dryer. 

off street parking, 

phone and cable 

comtKBons in every room, 

security lighting. 

Hash and lawn care 

Security deposit is The same 

ss one itiomh'j rent 

One fear Less* period 

begins August 1st 

4 Stylm* 

4 Bedrooms, 7 Baths 

2.600 Sq Ft 

Monde Condu 

2 Living Ruoitis. Wftlk-uul 

upper' dsck. Is roe study 

attics. Structured cable. 

Spacious laundry room 

ONlVH.SitVmD 

4 Bedrooms. 2 Baths 
1,800 Sq Ft 

Hacienda 

2 Living fluoms. Spacious 

laundry room 

0NLY$t.250/mo 

4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths 

1.600 Sq Ft 

2 Levels Study orfic* 

ONLY Sl.tMimo 

4 Bedrooms. 2 Baths 

1,300 Sq Ft 

ON IV II, ISO/mo 



IsseWt W aejssieHk e est 



Way 31 J-«7I t 
MtoMr U7-4VM* 



AVAILABLE JUNE and 
Augusi Two. three, tout 
hvs and six bedrooms 
Close to campus No pels 
washer ' dryer 785-317- 
5026 

AVAILABLE NEXT school 
year Three to eight-bed- 
room houses Ail have full 
tutchen. washer.- dryer 
central air Can now tor 
beat selection www tore- 
mostproperty com 785- 
539 4641 

FIVE FOUR three and 
two-bedroom homes 

June and May leases No 
smoking No pets 7BS 
776-3184 

FOR PENT '■■>.' i 

rooms two bath house 
Three Nocks trorti cam- 
pus August 1 lease 1430 
Vial a Ln 1400/ month 
washer/ dryer, air COrvdl 
tuning Contact 913-558 
7498 

HOUSES MANY sites 
and prices June or Au 
gust 785-341-0686 

LARGE FOUR-BEO 

ROOM, two bathroom 
carpeted tec room Near 
Aggievills/ campus, cen- 
tral air. wasner/ dryer dis- 
posal fireplace garage 
Available now. lease 
lerma negotiable 785-317- 
5486 

ONE. TWO, three, and 
four-bedroom houses 
Cloae to campus/ also 
wests Ida Available Im- 
mediately. No pets 705 
539-1875 or 785-313 
MM. 

ONE TWO three, four 
five. and six -bedroom 
apartments and houses 
available foi June and Au- 
gust 785 539-6295 




4 


l Classifieds 


l ' illegian 


i; !.'.'•*' | 



•COMPLETE LIST ot 
houses close lo campus 
tor sale larrylimbock 

erdreeceandmchois com 
785-317-7713 Corner- 
stone fleetly 




ROOMMATE WANTED 
as aoon as possible 1 One 

block from campus' You 
will have your own bed- 
room and own full bath- 
room 1 With washer dryer 
dishwasher, and (noplace 
Water and trash paid tor 1 
it inlerested call Cami al 
785 747-674? oi email 
me c2|*£ksu edu 



1999 OAK WOOD three 
bedroom two-bath walk 
m closets garden tub 
shed Located in Walnut 
Grove 18000 or beat oi- 
ler Call 785-317-4689 




ATTENTION BARENTS' 
Investors several invest 
mant properties lot sale 
near campus AH proper 
lies are turn key with good 
renlal history Doug 765- 
3135573 or email '" 
merOksuedu 




FEMALE FtOOMMATE 
wanted as soon as possi- 
ble $300 per month plus 
hall utilities Own room 
and parking Please call 
3 1 6- 204 ■ 7208 

PeTOlT Ro^Wat? 

wanted to We with two 
clean tnenrjy girts Spa- 
cious three-bedroom 
house Includes washer, 
dryer dishwasher, and 
gangs Close lo the sta- 
dium (366/ month 785- 
477.113S 

HJuUJ sUbleasI! 

wanted $285 rant, dose 
lo campus 620-498-7670 

mm wANfEt to 

share three bedroom 

house $250 a month utili- 
ties paid Call 785-537- 
M*7 

LOOKING FOR lemnie 
grad student to share 
three bedroom two balh 
room house $350 Lease 
$ move-in dale flexible E 
mail alarsenttksu edu 

MALE HOOMMATF 

wanted House three 
blocks from campus 
$325 00 p<us one -tburth ol 
utilities Call 620 728 
1345 

ROOM FOR Rem Univer 
sity Gardens Two bed 
room/ two balh Share 
Willi male grsd student 
Rent is $280 plus utilities 
Contecl me al marycfiiisii 
netandnere) yahoo com 
or 913-1320 0579 



LARGE ROOM lor rent 
lour -bedroom, two baths 
and one-fourth biHa Calf 
Adam 620-655- HOI 
ONE-BEDROOM :N two 
bedroom house Groat 
roommate February 1 
June 1 S38S per month 
includes ail utilities except 
internet' cable Close to 
campus Price nego- 

tiable 7S5 -427-6636 

SiJBLEASeR rsEEfifLS 

through May or July with 
option lo renew lor follow 
rng yeeri Three-bedroom 
house with private room 
washer' dryer, wireless in 
ternet digital cable with 
DVfl $275 rent plus unti- 
tles on average ($50 I ca- 
ble and Internal included 
Move in Todayi 719-432- 
7015 

T V'.O BEDfl66Us avaii 
able in lour bedroom 
apartment University 

Crossing fully furnished 
very nee. $329/ month 
Lease is now until late 
July N Pradenot44ejya 
hoocom 913-907-9566 





THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verity the financial po- 
tential ol advertise- 
ments In the Employ- 
ment/ Career classifica- 
tion Readers are ad 
vised to approach arty 
such business opportu- 
nity with reasonable cau- 
tion The Collegian 
urges our readers to 
contact the Better Bust 
ness Bureau, 501 SE Jet 
terson, Topeka. KS 
88607- 1 tag 785 232- 



A WELL established pro- 
fessional landscaping 
company is seeking a roll 
able individual tor luli-tune 
employment in their land- 
scape installation division 
Prior landscape or larm 
experience preferred 
Above average wages 
commensurate with expe- 
rience and ability Benefits 
include marot medical 
paid leave and 40i k Ap- 
ply in person at 11524 
Landscape Ln St 
George. KS 66535 785 
494-2418 oi 765-776- 
0397 



ACCOUNTANT/ CFO: 
Due to our continued 
growth, CivicPIus, the na- 
tion's leading provider of 
City County, and School 
websites has an opening 
for a tun- lime accountant 
This career position re- 
quires the ability to handle 
multiple tasks and prion- 
lies while maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Accounting expert 
•nee is requned 
Peachtree experience pre 
rened Comparative pay 
plus bene tils including 
Health. Denial, Paid Holl 
days, Paw Vacai.cn ana 
40IK Email resume m Mi- 
crosoft Word or Text lor 
mat to 
lobaaovupiua com 




APPOINTMENT SET- 

TER CivicPIus is the na- 
tions leading provider of 
City, County and School 
websites We have full 
and part lime positions <n 
Manhattan wilh significant 
income potential for the 
right individual This post- 
lion involves calling poten- 
tial clients to setup web- 
nar appointments Pay is 
StO- hour plus $40 tor 
each webrnar appoint- 
ment you setup Full-time 
benefits include Health 
Dental Paid Holidays 
Paid Vacation and 401K 
matching Email resume 
n Microsoft Word or Text 
format to 
tobeOcivicplus com 



COACH, Eisenhower Mid- 
dle School Salary set by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spnng season Accepting 
resumes or letters with 
qualifications until position 
is filled Apply to Manhat- 
tan-Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poynlr Ave, Manhat 
tan KS 66502 785-587- 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



UArrTEkDlkG' 



$300 A 
day potential No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 1-600 965 
6520 e»1 144 

BILLING COORDINA 
TOR: Due to our contin- 
ued giowlh. CivicPIus the 
nation's leading provider 
of City, County, and- 
School websites has an 
opening lor a lull time 
Bilkng Coordinator This 
exciting opportunity re- 
quites the abiWy to handle 
multiple tasks and priori- 
ties while maintaining a 
positive and energetic atti- 
tude Competitive pay 
plus benefits including 
Health, Denial, Paid Holi- 
days. Paid Vacation and 
40 IK Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or Texl lor 
matte 

jobss>crvicplus com 
LrlldlML!- WORK at a 
place where you actually 
want to eat the toodl 
Chipotle is now hiring al 
positions Free bod. flexi- 
ble hours Apply 1 p m to 
' P" Mondau through 
Friday 785 587|p29 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2008 







CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 

785-532-6555 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 9 



II II 



■ ■■I ■ ■ 



•J s: uj. ■■ ! 




LET'S RENT 




AUGUST PRELEASEING 
servai units clews lo KSU 
Some only one year old 
All apUancsa nctudlnc 
*aaher' dryer energy etti- 
ceni apartments aft street 
parking call lor location; 
prices 7S5-77S-S102 

wwnwdksspts com 

AVAILABLE JUNE: One 
throe four, and five -bed 
room house* Ck»e to 
campus Reserve now tor 
Met selection 76&-S39- 
3672 Local landlord 




ONE. TWO. end three- 
bedroom apartments s«- 
cellenl condition Next tn 
K- State and AggievHte rea- 
sonable raw* private 
parking attentive land- 
lord no pet* June and 
August leases TNT 
Rentals 785-539-SS08 

ONE. TWO. and three 
bedroom apartments new 
construction next to K- 
Siate and Agojeutlle up- 
scale newer apartments 
washer' dryer dish' 
washer central air. pri- 
vate parking, security light- 
ing, no pets June and Au- 
gust leases TNT Rentals 

7h<> m ten 



COMPUTER PROGRAM 
MERS wanted tor posi- 
tions in the Knowledge 
Discovery in Databases 
Research group a I K- 
Slate AppUcani* should 
be responsible, dlUgent 
and creative and should 
he lamillar with Cf or 
Java, or have the ability to 
learn Pay is commensu- 
rate with experience: an 
grades are encouraged to 
apply Call 785-341-1599 
ot send resume to bhssi <&- 
asJuu.edu, 

OAVCARE NEEDED (or 
two girts, 4 years and B 
months of age Couple 
hours a day and some 
evenings, please have ref- 
erences Contact Amy at 
785-410-5718 or e-mail 
ms at emy-pics1<9co» • 
net 

EARN $800- $3200 a 
month m drive brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
(hem www AdCarCkib - 



GRAPHIC DESIGN: Civic - 
Plus, a Manhattan baaed 
company and the leader 
in government websites. 
« seeking luiioroe and 
contract graphic design- 
ers No HTML experience 
1 but must be 
In Photoshop 
An understanding ot 
flash. Adobe Illustrator, 
and Microsoft Word is 
hetprul but not required 
Must be able to manage 
multiple protects simulta- 
neously In a last-paced 
environment Full -time 

benefits include heaKh . 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 (k) 
matching Email resume 
and design samples lo 
toba0dvlcpkis.com 

GREAT JOB (or Out- 
dooray Peoplel Kaw VM- 
; ley Greenhouses is look- 
ing for help this growing 
• season We are interested 
m part or lull-tone ached- 
' ules lor the second 
semester For more infor- 
mal Ion contact human re- 
sources at Kvgempkiymen- 
' tdttyahoo.com or 785-776- 
' 8585 To apply in person 
| go to 360 Zeandaie Rd 
, Manhattan. Monday- Fri- 
day Bam - 4p.m. 

HEAD TENNIS COACH, 
Eisenhower Middle 

School Salary set by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spnng season Accepting 
resumes or tellers with 
qualifications until position 
is tilled Apply w Manhat- 
tan-Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poynti Ave. Manhat- 
tan, KS 68502 785 587- 
2000 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 




Summer /Fall Leasin 

Best deal in town on 

1 or 2 bedrooms! 

Student specials if leased by feb. 5, 
call now 785539.29S1 



FOUR. FIVE. su. seven. 
,11 u ; eight-bedroom 

houses aicertenl condi- 
tion next to K- State and 
Agglevllie Multiple 

kitchens and bathrooms. 
washen dryer. dish- 
washer, central air, rea- 
sonable rates, no pets 
June and August leases 
TNT Rentals 7S5-53& 
0549 

NEW HOUSE, lour-bed- 
room. two bathroom. 
dose to campus, avail- 
able August 1st 1614 
Pierre 785-304-0387 

NEWLY REMODELED 
three-bedroom, one bath- 
room, large garage 1401 
Vums 785- 304 -0387 



NEXT TO campus. Avail- 
able now. June and Au- 
gust One. (wo, three, 
lout. live. six. and nine- 
bedrooms Apartments, 
houses, and multiplexes 
No pats 78S-5J7 7050 

NICE BRITTNAY Ridge 

Townhome lour bed- 

room, two and 1/2 bath. 
all appliances, washer' 
dryer August 1 No pets 
$980' month 785 293 
5197 

THREE. FOUR, and live- 
bedr-ooma Didnt get the 
house you wanted last 
year' The good ones go 
fast Call 785-341-06*6 



V 

Help Wanted 



HELP WANTED; KSU 
BEEF CATTLE RE- 
SEARCH CENTER 
CONTACT: Garrett at 
gparsons@ksu edu or 
785-539-4971 

HIRING WAITS TAFF (or 
KbIHoum Lounge Apply 
in person alter 4p.m at 
1111 Mora, Manhattan KS 

HOME CHtLDCARE 

wanted (or 2, 5 and T year 
ok) Drrvable and reliable 
car needed References 
required Contact Lindsey 
at 785-317-2140 or 
IknurseTO&gmsil.com for 
more information. 

HORTICULTURAL SER- 
VICES Garden Canter is 
•asking reliable, moti- 
vated individuals tor tull- 
time and part-erne sea- 
sonal positions m our re- 
tail store Above average 
wages commensurate 
with experience and abili- 
ties Apply In person at 
11524 Landscape Ln St 
George, KS 66535. 785- 
4942418 or 785-776- 
0397 

K- STATE LIBRARIES has 
two openings lor work 
from 8- noon in the mail 
room at Hate Library 
Heavy lifting required To 
apply, go to www lib ksu - 
edu Adirmalive Action' 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer 

LABORERS NEEDED 

Howe Landscape Inc is 
currently seeking laborers 
lor our landscape, irriga- 
tion and mowing: maile 
nance divisions. Appli- 
cants must be 18 years of 
age. have a valid drivers li- 
cense and pass a pre-em- 
ployment drug test We 
can work with class sched- 
ules hut prefer 4- hour 
blocks ol lime Starting 
wages are S800' hour 
Apply three ways, in per- 
son Monday- Friday si 
12780 Madison Road in 
Riley: can 785-776-1697 
to obtain an application 
or e-mail us al aakhowe@- 
landscape com 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 
and Landscape Foreman 
needed. Competitive pay 
and benelrls Please con- 
tact Alhans Services In 
c of Topeka, KS 785-23? 
1558 or www athansaer- 
vicas.com 

LAW FIRM is seeking on 
office assistant runner - 
part-lime, flexible hours 
available. Please submit 
resume to Human Re- 
sources. 555 Poynt/ Ave. 
Ste 240. Manhattan. 
Kansas, 66502 



V 

Help Wanted 



MAINTENANCE 

WORKER I (Horticul- 
ture). Starting Salary: 
113.22' hour (lull-time) 
Position Purpose As- 
sists the Hortleultuie sec- 
lion m meeting Its objec- 
Bves by providing labor, 
Operating machinery, and 
various divisional equip- 
ment Assists Horticultur- 
ist In routine landscape 
Maintenance required to 
provide high quality munic- 
ipal grounds, facilities, ser 
vices and experiences lo 
park patrons Experience 
Required: Knowledge ol 
types and uses ot com- 
mon hand tools Basic 
skills In irrigation, pruning, 
planting, and pest control 
are valuable assets, along 
with a general understand- 
ing of lurl and landscape 
maintenance practices 
Willingness and ability to 
perform heavy manual la- 
bor for extended periods 
of 
all 

routine repetitive tasks es- 
sential. Applicants should 
possess mathematical 
skills, oral commun cation, 
writing, and reading skills 
to complete bask: reports, 
read plans and directions, 
and communicale M 
ers Special Require- 
ments: Musi have and 
maintain valid driver's li- 
cense Closing Date: 
01/31108 All applicants 
selected tor employ- 
ment am subject to post 
offer pre-employment 
drug screening. Appn 
cants should be at least 
18 years old or older for 
most posrttons, but no 
younger than 18 lor any 
position To be consid- 
ered lor an available posi- 
tion you must complete a 
City of Manhattan applica- 
tion and return it to the at- 
tention ot Human Re- 
sources by 5p.m. on the 
closing date For informa- 
tion visit City Haft. 1101 
PoynU Ave. wwwct.man- 
hattan . ks uu|obs asp. . or 
email lObs-ffci manhatlan - 
ks us Equal Opportunity 
Employer 




Help Wonted 



MAKE A DIFFERENCE! 
DO SOMETHING DIF- 
FERENT! Camp ooun 
selors wanted. Friendly 
Pins* Camp. Prescott 
A2, is hiring lor 08 see- 
son 5/24- 7/31 30 plus ac- 
tivities, equestrian, water - 
ski. waterfront ropes 
course. dtmbing and 
morel Competitive salary 
Call 928-445-2128. e-mail 
mtodrriendlypines com or 
visit website www.fnend- 
lypines.com for applica- 
tion' inlormatlon Have the 
summer ot a lletime" 
MECHANICALLY IN- 

CLINED student to do 
apartment and upkeep 
beginning immediately 
Flexible hours Variety ot 
work: carpentry, electrical 
plumbing, painting yard 
work, and general mainte- 
nance. Send letter and re- 
sume c/o Student Publica- 
tions. Box 300. Manhattan 
66506 

NOW HIRING Subway 
Work up lo 20 hours a 
week, meals provided 
Day, night, and weekend 
shifts needed Will work 
around schedule Pick up 
application at any Sub- 
way, including the Student 
Union. 

PART-TIME MEDICAL Ft.. 
ceplionist Tuesday and 
Thursday 1- 5pm for 
spnng semester Mail or 
Fax resume Manhattan 
Foot Specialists. 1117 Wa- 
ters Street. Manhattan. 
KS 66503 Fax 785-539- 
4204 

PAH I TIME^eSptionTa^ 
office assistant experi- 
ence with quickbooks and 
Microsoft oftice written 
and verbal communication 
skill* important ability to 
multi-task and work In a 
dynamic environment 

send resume to 

chad"* ncs -online com 

PRESCHOOL NURSERV 
positions available lor lo- 
cal college students on 
Wednesday and/ or Sun- 
day mornings at Faith 
Evangelical Free Church 
We have a flexible work- 
ing environment and greal 
children to work with. Pay 
is J 7 10 an hour Conlac 
Chris for more informs 
tion, chris barker VfeJc 
manhatlan org or 785 776 
1086 



PROGRAM ASSISTANT 
{Sunset Zoo). Starling 
Salary: $6 30, hour (Sea- 
sonal) Position Respon- 
sibilities: To facilitate a 
variety ot high quality, rev- 
enue generating, and edu- 
cational programs such as 
birthday parties, cam- 
pouts, classes, and clubs. 
as well as live animal pro- 
grams at Sunset Zoo Po- 
sition also assists with the 
supervision and training 
volunteers Experience 
Required: High school 
graduate ot GEO re- 
quired plus background 
knowledge of zoos, ani- 
mals, and current educa- 
tion practices vital Excel- 
lent public speaking skills 
and ability to adapt to a 
variety of audiences and 
volunteer needs required 
Musi be able to work with 
little supervision Position 
schedule very versatile, 
working one to thirty 
hours per week, depend- 
ing on stall needs and per- 
sonal schedule Special 
Requirement. Must have 
and maintain a valid 
drivers license Closing 
Dale: Open until tilled All 
applicants selected tor 
employment are aubjscl 
to post-offer pre-employ 
ment drug screening Ap- 
plicants should be at least 
IB years of age or older 
tor most positions, but not 
younger than 16 tor any 
position To be consid- 
ered tor an available posi- 
tion, you must complete a 
City ot Manhattan applies 
Bon and return H to the at 
tendon ol Human Re- 
sources by 5p m on the 
dosing dele For informs 
bon visit City Han. not 
Poynu Ave. wwwciman- 
hattan ks us/Jobs asp , or 
e-mail joimCci. manhatlan • 
ks us Equal opportunity 
Employer. 

PROJECT MANAGER: 

CIvlcPius has an opening 
in our Manhattan head- 
quarters office for a full- 
time Protect Manager 
This challenging position 
entails managing multiple 
wsbsite redesign pro|ects 
from start to nfUsh Posi- 
tion requires attention to 
detail, the ability to man- 
age multiple tasks pnon- 
ties and deadlines, and a 
cheerful attitude. Training 
Is provided. Benefits in- 
clude Health. Dental Paid 
Holidays. Paid Vacation 
and 40 IK matching 
Email resume in taxi ot 
Word lormat to 
(Cbs3>civicplus com 




SPRING/ SUMMER Sea- 
sonal Seasonal posi- 
tions, non -benefit eligible 
Starting Salaries: $5 85/ 
hour to 124 00- game, 
pending position and quali- 
fications PosWone Dat- 
ing: Umpires, referees. In- 
structors, and program su- 
pervisors for various 
sports programs (base- 
ban, soriba*. basketball, 
soccer, volleyball, etc.): 
Day camp Counselors 
and Coordinators: bsJMsid 
maintenance: swim 

coach, lifeguard, cashier, 
basket checker, and water 
aerobic* instructor lor the 
pools Spec let Require- 
ments: Applicants must 
be at leaat 16 years ot 
ege Prior seasonal em- 
ployee* are encouraged 
to re-apply Closing Dsts: 
Applications win be ac- 
cepted until posdions are 
filled. AH applicant! se- 
lected for employment 
are subject to post-offer 
pre-employment drug 
screening Applicants 

should be al least 18 
years ot age or older for 
most positions, but not 
younger than 16 tor any 
position To be consid- 
ered for an available posi- 
tion, you must complete a 
City ol Manhattan applica- 
tion and return It to the at- 
tention of Human Re- 
sources by 5p m on the 
closing data For Informa- 
tion visit City Had. 1101 
PoynU Ave. wwwciman- 
haftan ks u*/)obs asp . or 
s-m*il)obs<e>ct manhattan • 
ks. us Equal opportunity 
Employer 



STEEL ft PIPE Supply 
Company- Inventory Ana- 
lyst Assistant. There is an 
immediate opening tor an 
Inventory analyst assis- 
tant at our corporate of- 
fice. Position is responsi- 
ble for creating migration 
malerials. analyzing and 
monitonng SAP software 
processes, and assisting 
In analysis ol warehouse 
cycle counting data. Also 
support lor customer ser 
vice and sales stall Quail- 
Had candidate* wUi have 
basic math and account- 
ing. Work experience m in- 
ventory control a plus 
Two years college educa- 
tion preferred interested 
applicants should submit 
resume lo Steel & Pipe 
Supply. Inv Analysl As- 
sist . PO Box 1688, Man- 
hatlan. KS 66505 Equal 
Opportunity Employer 



STUDENT PUBLICA- 

TIONS Inc has a part- 
time position for a Macin- 
tosh technician available 
The lech support learn 
maintains about 50 Macin- 
tosh workstations, provid- 
ing software support as 
well as performing gen- 
eral hardware mainte- 
nance Any experience 
with Mac OSK. design 
software such as Adobe 
Photoshop, Adobe inOe- 
sign, and networking is 
helpful but not required 
Pay starts at 18 50 par 
hour wrtti the opportunity 
to advance Musi be a full- 
time studeni at KSU Ap- 
plications may be picked 
up in 113 Kedzie or online 
al http -www kstatecolle- 
gian com.-'spub- Down- 
load Vm> second applica- 
tion al this link Applica- 
tion deadline is 5 pm Fri- 
day, February 15, 2008 
Pteas* include your 
sprtng 2008 das* sched- 
ule. 



H*,t*iUM'K 



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Burger King is seeking high- 

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M Otfi-l 

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■He iirfmrm program 
■'•avin^bondpuitnavt' program 

draw apply m Manhattan at 
DJSlaiaitw or tOtUtndrtun 



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Management 

Are mhi (i in In lc ill positive, 
fasl pared and enthusiastic i 

Burprr kinq'i ol Manliartan and Junction 
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No ipstauranl eupmwKe? Hoprobkrn wp will tram the right 
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Fu imrr Hfarmalwii t onrprwi* !tw 
m ling i urn nnnnunift stow ran «i 



n 



KimBeyn 

DntrKt Manager 

fkliqff King Oftkr 

n la M 

Osier. UUS1I 

4uJaj)»40t), *ili« 

wv fi¥»Jtsfln|iis*sB<ttiNQ. , £Bk , n 



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package includes health, dental, vision, 401k, profit sharing, paid 
holiday, and paid time off. Please send your resume and salary 
requirements to: GTM Sportswear, 520 McCall Rd, Manhattan, KS 
66502 or e-mail humanresources^igtm com 
If you have ,t port folio online or on CD, please provide thjj* as well. 



THE BEST Summer Job 

Wtiy tiiko in our backcoun- 
try, rids horses on our 
rugged ir*ilt and brsatti* 
tretn mountain air aH lum- 
inal long' II comes with 
the K» Cheley Colorado 
Camps. A residential 
wilderness camp lor ages 
9- 17 Employment from 
679- 6*11 ot extended op- 
portunities Ca* us at !• 
800-CampFun or visit out 
website at siww^titlty.- 

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WILDCATSNEEDJOBS 
COM. PAID survey takers 



Open Market 




IOCS Ires to pin Click on 
survey*. 

WORK AT home, book 
keeping and sales repre- 
sentaitve v ou can work 
al home and earn up lo 
$3000- $4000 monthly 
Contact it interested E 
mail Igboclarotdnopi net 

ZOO CREW Supervisor 
Sunaat Zoo Sterling 
Salary: $58S/ hour ipart- 
tima, non-beneM eligible) 
Experience Required: 
Diploma or GED required, 
plus excellent supervisory 
sxills, experience working 
with teen* and animal 
knowledge vital Must 
maintain a valid dnver'i li- 
cense and be able to work 
Mondays trto more than 
(our hours) Incumbent 
will supervise and edu- 
cate several teen vokin 
tears working with bask 
animal husbandry Clos- 
ing Date: Open until filled 
All applicant* selected 
for employment are aub- 
|ect to post-offer pre-eni 
ployment drug screen- 
ing. Applicant* should be 
ai least 18 yeais ol sga or 
older for most position*, 
but not younger than 18 
lor any position To be 
considered lor an avail- 
able position, you must 
complete a City ot Manhat- 
lan application and return 
I to the attention ol Hu- 
man Resources by 5pm 
on the closing date For In- 
formation visit City Mat. 
1101 Peyntt Ave. wwwcl.- 
manhettan ks us/|obs - 
asp . or e-mail )ObsOei - 
manhatlan ks us or Equal 
opportunity Employer 



DINETTE, CHEST ol 

drawer*, desk, rocker. 
wan unit, dresser, shelf, 
some antique lumiture 
miacenaneou*. beer col- 
leciable* 785-587-4W1 

FOR SALE: Emremary 
clean and comfy beige 
couch $199 or bett offer 
call Tracy at 316 250 
9924 




Transportation 




1998 DODGE Ram 2500 
Pick up SIT Laramie 
Four door. 4x4, 105k 
mile*. 360 automatic Ren 
able and clean $9600 
847-707-1250 

TSbTCoTSg'E Grand Caia- 
van special edition, new 
brakes, bras $2800 or 
best offer 785-317-3066 




seeking motivated K 
Slater's who wish to earn 
money last working part 
bme online from home 
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Need a place to advertise? 

We have space 
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1 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



su|doku 

Fill in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 



9 3 


9 8 

3 
4 5 


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1 6 


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Deadlines 



Cum. (led ads mutt be 
pieced by noon the day 

before you want youi all 
to lurv Classified duplay 

adi mult be placed by 

4 p.m. tvvti working day! 

pnoi to the date you 

want youi ad to run. 

CAU 785 532-6555 

t+m+H 'V4<4^ssf*an*T7tV>iaBEau 



Classified Rates 



1 OAY 

2(1 wot tli <i 
(12 ?S 
each word over 20 
20f per word 

JDAVS 

JO wordt or lew 

H'l 'd 

each word over 20 

2Sf per word 

3DAVS 

26 words or lew 

117 40 

each word over 20 

}0t per word 

4 DAYS 

20 wordi or lm 

J19JS 

each word cwei 20 

Kt per word 

5 DAYS 

20 wordi or leu 

(20 SO 

each word over 20 

40* per word 

{(oniecutive day rate) 



To Place An Ad 



Go to Kectz* 10) 
(acron from the K Stat* 

Student Union ) 

Office houtt are Monday 

through Friday from 

8 a.m. to S p.m 

or plate an ad online at 

www.kjtalecoilegian coin/ 

and duk the yeiipw 

iubmrt Cl4tai(i«d link 



How lb Pay 



All rlaiufiecH man be 
paid in advance unlet* 

you have an account 

with Student 
Publications trie Cash. 

Check, MasterCard or 
Vlsd are accepted 

There is a 12 S service 
charge on all returned 
checks We reserve the 

right to edit, rejector 
properly classify any act 



Free Found Ads 



I Ai a service to you, w* 

I fun found ads (or three 

days (ree ol charge 



Corrections 



If you find an erroi in 

your ad, pic j-.c call us 

I We accept > expansibility 

| only for the Hisl wrong 

insertion 



Cancellations 



tTKpir«4 w* witt refund 

'. h*y rpiTisunpng 

before noon th* d«y 

bef o<r the Ad I v to be 

pub' 4, f i#d 



Headlines 



For an entra charqe, 

we'll put a headline 

above your ad to catch 

tht readers ettenlion. 



Categories 



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Kuiii-tin Board 




HcxtsirvK Real Estate 




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"A 1 , ./ ' //,-.■/'( . Rf.ti Help, Real Oft ■ 
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PAGE 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2008 



POKER I Lesser-known MANAGER I Assistant 



sport amuses crowd 



{wttinued from Paoje I 

were still anxiously trying to 
see what was happening 

Clowns moved in to dis 
tract the bull and Schreiner 
was able to make it safely to 
the rail after several seconds 
He said lie was a little sore, 
but otherwise uninjured and 
planning to return to the event 
next year 

Diane Cumelison. also 
from Frankfort, said her hus 
band, |int, was one of the con- 
testants at the table She said 
she had never seen cowboy 
poker before and didn't know 
what to expect 



"I was scared to death be- 
cause I thought they were go- 
ing to bring out a sheep again," 
she said "I didn't know they 
were going to bring out a real 
bull I don't think the guys had 
any idea either." 

Lensi LaForge of Inde 
pendence, Kan, said cow- 
boy poker was new to her as 
well She said she felt terrible 
for Schreiner as he was being 
attacked, and wouldn't have 
been walching if a significant 
other were at that table 

"I'd be mad at him for do- 
ing it," she said "I think it's 
crazy, and I don't understand 
why they do it" 



served in Des Moines 



Conti nu*d from Page 1 

She also served as man- 
agement assistant to the city 
of Des Moines from July 
2005-January 2006, and she 
has been a presenter and par- 
ticipant at the International 
Citty/County Management As- 
sociation Annual Conferences 
and at the Association of Gov- 
ernment Accountants. 

Hilgers said at the time of 
recruitment, the city ma nag 
er's office decided to hire an- 
other assistant city manager 
instead of a deputy city man- 
ager because the assistant city 
manager position allows for 



possible promotion. 

"We've been short ol that 
assistance in the last several 
months, and she'll definitely 
fill a void in that area," Hilgers 
said. 

Though Des Moines has 
about four times the popu- 
lation of Manhattan, Palm- 
er said the same management 
principles apply within both 
cities. 

"Manhattan is a little 
smaller community and a dif- 
ferent community in a lot of 
respects, but they are similar," 
Palmer said "I think the issues 
of providing municipal servic 
es are the same." 



On the brink of change 




RECRUIT | Students 
enjoy atmosphere 



Continued from Page 1 

Open House, Parrott said. 

These events, unlike 
Forma! Recruitment, fol- 
low no required timeline 
or dress Various movie 
nights, game nights or oth- 
er events with the sororities 
allow prospective members 
to see what the chapters 
are really like, she said 

The houses then de- 
cide as a whole if they want 
to give individual prospec- 
tive members bids, and the 
potential members can re- 
ceive bids at any time. The 
girls can go to multiple 
chapters' events, but only 
accept one bid, Parrott 
said. 

Some prospective 



members enjoyed and ben- 
efited from the relaxed 
Open House atmosphere 

"I'm a transfer student 
and coming after everyone 
already has their groups of 
friends established," said 
Krista Bennett, sophomore 
majoring in psychology 
"Spring Recruitment is al- 
lowing me to get involved 
with the Greek Communi- 
ty early. There seems to be 
so much fun and so much 
community in this Greek 
system, and 1 can't wait to 
get involved and meet new 
people." 

Greek Affairs is hop- 
ing the outcome of this 
year's Spring Recruitment 
will be a positive one, Par- 
rott said. 



WOMEN | Gipson 
gets double-double 



Matt Ultra | COLLEGIAN 
President Jon Wtfald along with the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, listen to Myra Gordon Associate Provost for Diversity and Duel Career Development 
outside the Martin Luther King Jr. Bust Friday afternoon. Gordon said the Coretta Scott King Gardens will be completed next year. 



Continued from Page 6 

being offensively." 

Oklahoma State stayed 
in reasonable distance of the 
Wildcats, coming within two 
points just after K- State's 
run Holding a slim 64-60 
lead with 57 seconds left, K 
State was able to stop the 
Cowgirls from scoring, de 
fending on four shot oppor- 
tunities in 36 seconds and, 
with two free throws from 
Dtetz, went ahead 66-60 

Oklahoma State soph- 
omore guard Andrea Riley 
kept the Cowgirls alive by 
draining a three point basket 
with 11 seconds remaining. 
Riley led the Cowgirls with 
34 points and was the only 
player for Oklahoma State 
in double- figures. 

"Riley is obviously just 
an unbelievable talent and 
her ability to score one-on- 
one, her quickness and her 
ability to get to the rim is ex 
traordinary," Patterson said. 

Without DieLi's produc- 
tion in the first hall, K-State 



got help from junior forward 
Marlies Gipson, who put up 
10 points and six rebounds 
in the first half Gipson fin- 
ished with a double- dou- 
ble, putting up 21 points and 
pulling down 16 rebounds. 

"When Gipson ends the 
game with 16 rebounds 
there are just no words to de- 
scribe the effort that she gave 
in an attempt to win this bas- 
ketball game, and I think you 
say the same thing about Di 
etz in the second half, 1 ' Pat- 
terson said. 

Despite Gipson 's strong 
performance, K-S(ate was 
out-rebounded 52-30 Okla 
homa State coach Kurt Bud 
ke said there were too many 
wasted opportunities by the 
Cowgirls, especially after get- 
ting offensive rebounds. 

"We almost had more 
offensive rebounds than they 
had total rebounds, so we 
didn't take advantage of our 
second chances," he said. 

Lehning had 13 points 
and sophomore forward 
Ashley Sweat scored 12. 



dependant, qmhtr service 



tiHoM'iM-i'i'} 'i H.i 



In Progress Through 
January 31st! 

£laflin. Jlooki and topi** 





ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS 

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*i7JAoW-A-Htfw* (MO Cleanup, 10- ISnoon 
L Meet at Scene Overtook on I 177 Bnng gloves and a sac* lunch . everyone 
\ wetomei Lac* tar K State Socd Justice Aaancc blue signs wsi north oil- 70 

1-1 

ol Rwrss Iramng Ufcrtsrcp tor lawyers, socaj workers clergy ana concerned 
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11 

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The Army ROTC Leader's Training Course is a paid 4 -week summer experience that 
marks trie beginning of your career as an Officer, a leader of the U.S. Army. 

Find out more about Kansas State Army ROTC's Summer Leader's Training Course. 



lIlEIESTi 



WaWH 



Contact Major Jim Porter 

at 532-8323 
or emailjporter@hsu.edu 



ARMY STRONG. 



ARMY ROTC. START STRONG. 




Volence/torMolence and Dsabrty " J»o> Anderson and 

Jasor Meseoerg torr*r*ar\ It Sat Owelty Support Services 

7pm UmonS13 sponsored by empower cats and ACTON 



"Manns Food rour Friend Agar,,' Jessea Setmck 
National tatmg Dsoroers Awareness *ee* Speaker 
7 p m . Lkxm Man Bahoom. SponaceO by SNAC (Sensefe 

Nutrition And tody knage Owes) PEER Eeiucators. KSu 
Student Governng Ajscoaocn and Were Heath Center. 

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*nv»iem AAanui Arts 

Noon to T p m , Unwn Courtyard 
Afcdo. TaeHwonFJo, yoga, la dt 
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Mordey through hyJey \i\ 
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Wroductory Trwwig 
March S9\1«* 



Make a be** to support local hunger 
organaaoons *t«ch tor ads at Texas St* K State 
and WHS Ceramics Department MAC and other 
locators 



A store narwote* demonstration to counter the 
«*rt messages of Fred Bwfcs, carry ncrrwig, 
K State A{rt graduation 



Mew '•* Wkp- OrV/CCin Pwttr laj 

Available c the Unon 



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S~^\ KANSAS STATE 

Collegian 



www.kititKollfgun.com 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2008 



Vol.lU|No.S6 



Significant earnings 

Students donate plasma to make cash, help others 



By Deborah Muhwnl 
KANSAS STATE COLUC.IAN 

Durand Reeves said the first 
time he donated plasma he was 
nervous because of the fear of 
pain. 

"I'm not good with needles," 
Reeves, sophomore in pre jour- 
nalism said, "But 1 got 
over 




because of the money" 

Reeves is not the only student 
who has had the false preconcep- 
tion that donating plasma is pain- 
ful, said Kimberly Agwu, junior in 
pre nursing and phlcbolomisl at 
ZLB Plasma Services in Manhat- 
tan 

"It doesn't hurt at all." Agwu 
said "The only thing is whether or 
not you are afraid of needles" 

And for those still intimidat- 
ed by needles, the cash incentive 
might be of some comfort, like 
Reeves said it was for him. 

For donating plasma, students 
can earn $40 their first time and 
the same amount for their sec- 
ond donation - if they come back 
within 7 days, Agwu said. 
"Last semester. I went ev- 
ery couple days," Reeves said. 
The first time takes a long 
time, but now it's pretty 
* smooth I get out of there 
L in about an hour." 
A Agwu said she 

sees several students ev- 
ery day coming in to do- 
nate plasma to make 
money. She also said 
most students are not 
aware of what plasma 
is and who it can ben- 
efit 

According to the 
BioLife Web site, a li- 
censed donating een 
ter that leads in the 
collections of high- 
quality plasma, do- 
nated plasma is 
used in the treat- 
ment of serious 
disorders like 
hemo phi I - 
ia and im- 
m u n e - 
system 
defi- 



IN ORDER TO DONATE PLASMA, YOU MUST MEET THE 


FOLLOWING CRITERIA: 




WE Minimum 18 years 


ADDRESS: You must provide 


cell donor or recipient) 


Mjumum 65 years 


proofed! permanent local 






address within the donor 


GOOD HEALTH You must 


■MR Mm IN 


recruitment area ol the faol 


be in good health and feel 


pounds 


ity In which you would like 


well the day you present to 




to donate this proof can be 


donate 


IDCMTIFKATIOM You must 


in the form of a current and 




provide one or more forms of 


valid drrtet's license listing 


DltT/NUTRITKM Proper 


identification that includes 


your physical address a 


food and adequate fluid 


the following inlotmation: 


signed lease agreement be 


intake are essential tot a suc- 


a photo, a signature, date 


tween you and your current 


cessful donation For ad- 


ot birth, and social -security 


landlord, or a utility bill or 


ditional information in regard 


number Some maniples ol 


other item) mailed through 


to diet and nutrition, please 


acceptable identification 


the United States Costal Sec 


see the BioLife Web page at 


would be: social-security 


vtce lUSttl, so long as the 


www.btdlfeplasrna.com/ 


card, dnm's license, valid 


postmark is dated within the 


en'pl&sma learning- center/ 


passport, certified birth cer- 


lasl 60 days. 'Exception to 


wel Iness html w request a 


tificate. 10 cant issued by a 


the donor recruitment area 


copy of a Bioitfe Nutrition 


government agency or other 


is as follows: College stu- 


Brochure at your kxal hot* 


entity (e.g., US military II) 


dents and military personnel 


Plasma Services FacKity 


tied, school, employment, 


and donors participating in 




state, etc.), ot permanent 


a specific antibody collection 




residence card Issued by CIS. 


program (e.g.. red -blood 


- mmittC9lU 



ciencies and to make products 
used to help treat and prevent dis- 
eases like tetanus, rabies, mea- 
sles, rubella and hepatitis B. tn ad- 
dition, hospitals and emergency 
rooms all over the world use plas- 
ma-derived albumin in the treat- 
ment of traumatic injuries like 
shock and severe hums 

Agwu said donating plasma 
can cause only minimal side ef- 
fects 

"tf you donate a lot. scar lis 
sue can occur, but this isn't nec- 
essarily bad," she said, "It's just a 
part of the healing process." 

According to the BioLife Web 
site, to donate, a person must be 
at least 18 years old and weigh at 
least 110 pounds. There also are 
individuals who might not be eli- 
gible because of factors like preg- 
nancy, a recent tattoo or blood 

transfusion. 

V Cynthia Tamboue, junior 

» in chemistry and plasma 

services phlebotomist, 

said there are tests 

ij^^ people go through 

before they can 

donate. 



The reason why the first time 
takes so iong is because we give 
a complete physical to make sure 
the person is able to donate," Tam- 
boue said. 

Tamboue said people interest- 
ed in giving plasma should come 
prepared, and the process will go 
quicker 

"If you come in hydrated and 
eat healthy prior to coming in, 
it's only going to be long the first 
time," she said "Every time after 
should only lake about 45 minutes 
if you come in prepared" 

Tamboue said people need to 
make sure they drink plenty of wa- 
ter at least 12 to 24 hours before 
coming in. She also said it is nec- 
essary to eat a healthy meal that is 
low in fat. 

"If you eat a meal too high in 
fat, we will be able to see it in your 
plasma, and you won't be able to 
donate," she said. 

Tamboue said students who 
donate plasma typically do so for 
financial benefit 

"We pay you 1u basically sit 

See PLASMA Page 6 



Union Holocaust display 
educates visitors 



By Eric Davis 
KANSAS STATE COIUG1AN 

K State students got an 
up-close and personal look at 
more than 1,000 Jewish names 
of those saved during the Ho- 
locaust by German industrial 
ist Oskar Schindler 

Visitors at the William 
T Kemper Art Gallery in the 
K- St ate Student Union Tues- 
day night enjoyed a short re- 
ception while viewing the 
traveling exhibit dedicated to 
the life of Schindler 

Consisting of five ac- 
cordion-style display boards, 
the exhibit gave a timeline of 
Schindler's life 

The exhibit, brought in 
by the Union Program Coun- 
cil and organized by the Unit- 
ed Slates Holocaust Memori- 
al, has been in the art gallery 
since Dec 2 1 and will be re- 
moved Friday. 

The boards explained 
Schindler's involvement with 
the German Schulzstaffel, his 
rise to power as a business- 



man and his transformation 
to Jewish hero. 

Schindler, who became 
wealthy exploiting Jewish 
slave labor, had a change of 
heart after walking through a 
Jewish work camp. After see- 
ing what the Nazis were doing 
to the Jews, Schindler set up 
a barracks at one of his facto- 
ries for his |ewish workers to 
live in. 

The displays had pictures, 
a short biography and a copy 
of the lists of |ewish names 
Schindler had saved 

After the hour-long re 
ception at the gallery, the 
movie "Schindler's List" was 
shown in the Flint Hills room 
in the Union. 

Caitlin Bums, sophomore 
in graphic design and Spanish 
and co-chairwoman for the 
U PC arts committee, said they 
brought the exhibit to campus 
to better educate the student 
body about the Holocaust 

"We decided it seemed 
like a really great exhibit for 
the students on campus to see 




Tracy Tucker 
(left), senior in 
English, and 
Mary Todd 
director of 
the Women's 
Center, view 
the traveling 
exhibit Monday 
evening about 
the life and 
work of Oskar 
Schindler The 
exhibit will be 
on display irs 
the William T. 
Kemper Art 
Gallery until 
Feb. 2. 



and get to know a little more 
about it," Bums said. 

Even students who were 
already well versed in the his- 
tory of the Holocaust found 
the display interesting and ed 
ucationa). 



Tracy TUcker, senior 
in English, said she took a 
course about Holocaust liter 
attire last semester and what 
she saw at the exhibit interest- 
ed her 

"It was really cool to see," 



Matt Castro 
i 0UBG1AN 



Tucker said. "Seeing the actu- 
al papers |list| was cool too ' 
Tucker said it is difficult 
for her to be shocked by im- 
ages and stories related to the 
Holocaust but called the ex- 
hibit powerful. 



r it 
lot 

lei 

e i 

nil 



Woman 

allegedly 

raped 



By Allison Vc-rts 

Kansas STm roll h;ian 

An 18-year old wom- 
an reported being forcibly 
raped during the early morn 
ing hours Sunday in northwest 
Manhattan, according to a Ki 
ley County Police report 

RCPD Capt Hank Nelson 
said the suspect in the alleged 
rape was unknown to the vic- 
tim Nelson said the rape does 
not appear to be related to 
other rapes in the area. 

No arrests have been 
made. 



Cloned 

meat 

approved 

for sale 



By Scott Giratd 

KANSAS STATE CnilM.lAN 

The Federal Food and 
Drug Administration ap- 
proved the sale ol meat from 
cloned animals on Jan 18, 
but grocery stores probably 
will not be selling it for up to 
a few years. 

The meat - whenever it 
hits store shelves - will nc 
be labeled as being cloned. 

The FDA stated cloned 
meat is no different than mea 
from traditionally raised anil 
mals, but the Department of 
Agriculture urged vendors to 
wait to sell the meal for sev- 
eral reasons, including con 
sumer fear of the product. 

One reason meat from 
cloned animals is not yet a 
viable market option is that 
several large food compa- 
nies like Tyson Foods Inc 
and Smithficld Foods Inc 
have said they will not carry 
cloned meat because custom 
ers are still hesitant with the 
cloning process, said Sean 
Fox, professor of agricultural 
economics 

Fox also said the process 
is not marketable at its cur- 
rent cost 

"Cloning is still a very ex 
pensive process," he said "If 
it is used, it will be for highly 
specialized purposes" 

Randall Prather, profes 
sor of animal sciences at the 
University of Missouri -Co- 
lumbia, said cloning is still in 
efficient, and some abnormal 
clones are still processed, but 
they are identified early and 
are not be used for reproduc- 
tion or for any products like 
meat or milk 

Prather also said meal 
from initial clones would 
not enter the market be- 
cause slaughtering the origi- 
nal clones for meat would de 
feat the whole process 

"There arc very few ani- 
mals that will enter the food 
chain immediately,' Prather 
said. "It will be the offspring 
of clones that will have a 
larger impact on the market " 

Another impediment is 
the high cost of the cloning 
process, Prather said 

"Because it lakes a lot of 
lime, it's very inefficient, and 

J'ou have to set up a large 
ah,' he said. "It's not some- 
thing you can do at the kitch- 
en table" 

Prather said people 
should not have hesitations 
when it iiuiiM lo cloned meat 
because the process is no dif- 
ferent than treating a cow so 
it will produce better milk, 
which is common in stores 
everywhere 

"That's the whole point," 
Prather said "If you can't 
tell, what difference does it 
make?" 

The announcement by 



SeeCIONE Page6 




GOING FOR THE GOLD PAGE 6 



mmm 



PAGE 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2008 



'Call 



776-5577 




ACROSS 
1 Locale 
S Workout 

venue 
I Garbage 

barge 

12 Smell 

13 Roma- 
man 
money 

.4 Desire 

15 Pasa- 
dena 
event 

17 Tim- 
buktu's 
country 

18 Wit- 
nessed 

19 Agile 
21 "Loves 

me (not)" 
(lower 

24 Indian 
wrap 

25 Green- 
eyed 
monster 

26 Soup 
legume 

30 Greek H 

31 Rids o* 
rind 

32 Remiss 

33 It's spent 
on 

inciden- 
tals 

35 Withered 



36 Zounds 1 ' 

37 Piluilary. 
eg 

36 Wood- 
chuck's 
cousin 

41 Water 
(Fr) 

42 Dm 
cubed 

43 Picketing, 
perhaps 

48 Lecher's 

look 
48 Tear 

50 — and 
proper 

51 Decisive 
battle 
time 

52 Crafty 

53 Collec- 
tions 

DOWN 
1 In lavor ot 



4 

5 
6 



2 Altar 

affirma- 
tive 

3 Ph. bfc 
data 
Stylish 
Radiate 
Ever- 
green 

7 Megan of 
"Willi 
Grace" 

8 Apex 

9 Grouch 

10 See 48- 
Across 

11 Dead 
Poets 
Society* 
director 
Peter 

16 Chesa- 
peake! 
lor one 

20 Eye 
part 



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24 Velocity 

26 DC tOO 

27 Entreaty 

28 Deserve 

29 Cut 

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the 

payroll 
31 Come 
stnp 
possum 

34 "Cats" 
show- 
stopper 

35 Eats 
soup 
loudly 

37 Roscoe 

38 Jell O 
creation 

39 Scored 
100 on 

40 Actress 
Perl man 

41 Catch 
sight of 

44 Zero 

45 Rage 

46 Do-it- 
your- 
selfer's 
buy 

47 Type 
squares 



Academy Award nominations for best picture 



"MICHAEL CLAYTON' "THERE WILL BE BLOOD" 



"JUN0" 



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MOWER 

Today'* t'rvptouuip Clue; R ecju-ik P 



The Collegian takes reports directly from 
the Riley County Police Department. 
Wheel locks or minor traffic violations are 
not listed because of space constraints 

FRIDAY, JAN. 25 

Candli Kay Anthony, St. George, Kan,, 
at 9:1 5 am for violation of a protective 
order, harassment by phone and proba- 
tion violation Bond was St, 500. 
Joshua Luke Kef ley, } 120 Lundin Drive, 
Apt. 3, at 1039 a.m. for probation viola- 
tion. Bond was S7S0. 
Michelle Dawn Inet Johnson 1004 Gar 
den Way, Apt. C, at 3:40 p.m. for posses- 
sion of a controlled substance or narcotic, 
unlawful possession of a depressant or 
narcotic, unlawful sale of a depressant 
or narcotic, failing to provide drug tax 
stamp, driving with a canceled or sus- 
pended license and exceeding maximum 
speed limits. Bond was $25,000. 
Nathaniel James Felt, 1020 Houston 
St., Apt 2, at 4:30 p.m. for possession of 
stolen property, burglary, criminal use 
of a weapon, possession of a cont rolled 
substance or narcotic and unlawful pos- 
session of a depressant or narcotic Bond 
was $3,000. 

Shawn Michael Leech, St. George, Kan., 
at 4 S5 p.m. for probation violation. Bond 
was $1,500 

Jennifer Sue Law, 1 8 1 7 Hunting Ave., 
Apt 3. at 5:29 p.m. for faisely reporting a 
crime Bond was $500 
Andrew Els worth Sutton. Junction City, 
at 1 1 :20 p.m. fot probation violation. 
Bond was $500. 

Trliton Robert Smith. Grandview Plaza. 
Kan., at 1 1 :45 p.m. for criminal trespass. 
Bond was $750. 

SATURDAY, JAN. 26 

Travis Shane Dalit orr* Torre*, 1 400 

University Drive, at 2:30 a.m. for aggra- 
vated battery recklessly causing great 
bodily harm and driving under the influ- 
ence Bond was $S,500. 
Joseph Tyler Cheeseman 1 $00 Oxford 
Place, at 3:55 a.m. for driving with a 
canceled or suspended license. Bond was 
$750 

Jurea Burgett, 301 N Juliette Ave.. 2, at 
8:32 a.m.. for driving with a cancelled or 
suspended license. Bond was $750. 
Brian Sewtll 2147 Patricia Place, at 
1 1 :42 a.m. for failure to appear. Bond was 
S500. 



Anthony Lee Keith Fort Riley, at 10:50 
p m. for driving with a canceled or sus- 
pend license. Bond was $500. 

SUNDAY, JAN. 27 

Curtis Eugene Harris Jr., 21$ S. Fifth St., 
at 1 2:20 am for unlawful possession of a 
depressant or narcotic and driving with a 
canceled or suspended license Bond was 
$1,500. 

Troy Michael Padgett 614 S. 1 7th St., at 
1:05 a.m. for driving under the influence 
Bond was $750. 

Timothy Edward Decoursey 1919 Hun- 
tington Road, at 3:30 a.m. for possession 
of a controlled substance or narcotic, 
unlawful possession of a depressant or 
narcotic and driving under the influence. 
Bond was $1,500. 

Jeremiah Adam Bradhurtt. 1 81 7 Hunt- 
ing Ave., Apt. i. at 12:4$ p.m. for failure to 
appear. Bond was $1,53$, 
Roger William Hammond, Junction City, 
at 4:0$ p.m. for unlawfully at ranging sale 
or purchases of controlled substance 
using a communication facility, unlaw- 
ful acts involving proceeds derived from 
violations of controlled substance act 
and sale of an opiate or narcotic. Bond 
was $20,000. 

James Dean Spain II, 1 505 Ranch View 
Circle, at 420 p.m. for theft Bond was 
$t,500. 

Jeffery Michael Kennedy. Fort Riley, at 
5:4$ p.m. for driving under the influence. 
Bond was $500. 

Randy Wick Siebold Sr . Clay Center, 
Kan,, at 610 p.m. for obstruction of the 
legal process and failure to appear. Bond 
was $1,250. 

Amanda Michel! Scheiner, 723 Blue 
mont Ave.. Apt. A, at 8:20 p.m. for theft 
and unlawful selling of theft detection 
shielding device Bond was $ 1 ,$00. 
Nathan Oean Thurman Lawton, Ok la, 
at 11:10 p.m. for failure to appear. Bond 
was $3,000, 

MONDAY, JAN. 28 

Trad Rae Ann Lock wood 1026 Garden 
Way, Apt C, at 1 10 a.m. for theft. Bond 
as $7S0. 

Matthew Alan Williams. Enterprise, 
Ala. at 2:50 a.m for driving under the 
influence, attempting to flee from law 
enforcement and accident involving 
damage to vehicle or property Bond was 
$1,SO0. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The Collegian, a itudent newspaper at Kansas Mate 
University, is published by Student Publications Inc. It 
is published weekdays during the school year and on 
Wednesdays during the summer. Periodical postage It paid 
at Manhattan, KS POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the 
circulation desk at Kedrie 103. Manhattan, KS 66506 7167. 
First copy free, additional copies 25 cents. (USPS 291 020| C 
Kansas State Cotlegian, 2007 



THE PLANNER 

CAMPUS BULLETIN BOARD 



Applications for Stu- 
dent Alumni Board 

are available at the 
Alumni Center or online 
at www k tfate.com/ 
Studenti/tfudentolumm 
board.aspt. An informa 
tion reception will be at 
the Alumni Center at 4:30 
p.m Feb. 5 for anyone 
interested in learning 
more about the group. 
Applications are due at 
the Alumni Center by 5 
p.m Feb. 7. 

Tha KSHSAA baseball 
rules maating will be 

at 7:30 p.m on Feb. 5 
at the Manhattan High 
School East campus. The 
meeting is for anyone 
Interested in umpiring 
high school baseball 
Anyone with questions 
can call Brad Hall at 
785-539-0810. 



The Riley County 
Crime stoppers organiza 
tion will have their annual 
Winter Benefit Softball 
Tournament on Feb 23 
and 24 at Twin Oaks Soft- 
ball Complex Mens and 
co- rec teams are invited to 
participate The entry fee 
is $115, and the sign-up 
deadline is Feb. IS. 

Application -, for Silver 
Key are due by 5 p.m Feb 

4 In the Office of Student 
Activities and Services In 
the K State Student Union, 
For more information visit 
www.kiu.edi t'silverkey. 

To place an item in the 
Campus Bulletin, stop by 
Kedzie llfeand fill out a 
form or e-mail the news 
editor at cotlegian@spub. 
km.edu by I 1 am, two 
days before it is to run. 



CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS 

There was an error in Friday's Collegian Testing for the 
text -messaging emergency system will begin sometime 
between Feb. 1 5 and March 1 The Collegian regrets this 
error. If you see an error in the Collegian, contact news 
editor Owen Kennedy at 785-532-6556, 



WEDNESDAY'S WEATHER 



& 



PARTLY CLOUDY 
High | 37 s Low | 22* 



B Prime Time 
Fitness Club 

Special Student Rates 

$80.00 per semester 

*t»vi,|irimi*linnTitiii ^-i liilmim 

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lUVGndeaVa) 
South <>l H'eatioM 



Happy 

Birthday 

Kansas 

1841 2008 



^ Advertise gsitm 




$2,00 

All Drinks, Premiums, 
Calls, Draws, & Shots, 
Bottles 

$3.50 

Belfast & Energy Bombs 

FREE POOL 
Now Hiring 



118 KEDZIE 



The Office of Student Activities and Services offers 



Free Consumer & Tenant Advice 



The Consumer and Tenant Affairs Office 
provides information on landlord/tenant 
rights and responsibilities and aids in the 
resolution of consumer complaints 
regarding products and/or services 
Brochures regarding landloroVlenanl and 
consumer issues are also available 



785-532-6560 



FREE POOL! 



t 



Fats 

BAR & GRILL 

' a.««i**lll* 




Consumer and Tenant Affairs Office 

Appointments Available Dally 

Call 5324541 to make an appointment 




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TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 3 



Students are asked to donate in blood drive 



tyJtnntScavuxfto 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

K-State students are given 
the opportunity to save at least 
three lives each January 

In celebration of the thou 
sands of lives rescued each year 
by blood-donor volunteers, the 
American Red Cross is sponsor- 
ing National Volunteer Blood 
Donor Month during Febru- 
ary by ret ogni ling donors while 
also educating the public on the 
need for blood. 

The organization is en- 
couraging K- State students to 
realize the importance of do- 
nating and attend the four cam- 
pus blood drives this month be- 
cause blood supplies often are 
at their lowest levels in January 

Students should donate 
blood Ihis month because it is 
one of the easiest ways to give 
back (o the community," said 
Nuriiui Dixon, communications 
manager of the American Red 
Cross 

Students who donate 
should get a mini-health exam, 
check (heir blood pressure and 
pulse and make sure they are 
feeling healthy the day of the 
donation, Dixon said 

Each donation of one pint 



HOW TO DONATE 

Help mm i life thii iinuwy by jiving 
Mood from 10 am to 5 p.m. Ti»ei4ay 
Jt Iosco Rim M I JO in to ):)0 
p.m. Wfdf*Ml*y in front at Boyd Hilt 

ffttfM* who comn in to fcntit it 
(he iii» wry Mood Amr will hiw # 
rharw to win mw of tour S2 5 Vim 
lift cards 

Vm can fimJ more infonwtlwut 
www ofcw^MtJrtr i "V f call H0-MS- 
3543 to mate yourapeointmm 

of blood helps saves the lives 
of three hospital patients, said 
Kristi Ingalls, donor recruitment 
representative for the American 
Red Cross 

Each year, the Ameri 
can Red Cross makes a goal 
to collect a total of 1.880 pints 
of blood from all four campus 
drives, and it is exceedingly rare 
lo not make this goal, Ingalls 
said. 

"If just 1 .880 pints of blood 
are donated - and we usually 
end up with more - 5,640 hos- 
pital patients are saved," Ingalls 
said. "It is such a huge gift that 
these donors volunteer their 
time to help people they don't 
even know" 

The American Red Cross 



honors these volunteers through 
sharing the grateful recovery 
stories of the blood recipients 
with the donors 

The American Red Cross 
also is working to educate the 
public on the vitality of giving 
blood this month, hoping pub 
In. iz m g its cause will encourage 
others to donate. 

Its local representatives 
have been speaking to various 
groups and organizations at 
K Stale on the importance of 
giving blood, Dixon said. Amer- 
ican Red Cross' Web site. wum>. 
bloodgiiviltfe.org, also aims to 
educate future donors on the vi- 
tality of donating by providing 
information, statistics and sur- 
vivor stories, she said 

Despite its immense cause, 
many do nol already give blood 
because there are negative myths 
associated with blood donation, 
Dixon said Many are also unin- 
formed about the cause and do 
not grasp the importance of giv- 
ing blood, she said 

"A lot of people think it's 
going to hurt or be invasive." 
Dixon said. "Donating blood is 
a very simple process - the ac- 
tual donation is only 10 min- 
utes long It's very easy, and I 
wish more people would give it 



a chance" 

The process of donating 
blood is set up into three simple 
steps, Dixon said. 

The donor signs up and 
shows up with a picture 111. goes 
through a health -history ques- 
tionnaire and donates blood 
for 10 minutes. The volunteer is 
given water and snacks to begin 
the replenishing process. 

In order to donate, the vol 
unteer must fit three general 
guidelines. Dixon said The do 
nor should weigh 1 10 pounds or 
more, be in general good health 
and be at least 17 years old In 
Kansas, however, a volunteer 
is allowed to donate at age 16 
with parental consent 

Some K-State students who 
have donated in the past are 
passionate about the impor- 
tance of the cause they have 
contributed to 

"Donating really helps 
out the community," said Matt 
Vernon, sophomore in histo- 
ry. "Others should give blood 
because there are a lot of peo- 
ple out there that have differ- 
ent blood types, and you nev 
er know when an emergency 
will occur 1 was only there for 
30 minutes, and 1 saved lives in 
those 30 minutes 1 was there." 



Stuart Withmgton 

employee of the 

Kansas Department 

of Transportation, 

visited the k State 

campus to attend 

a Supe reave 

Certification 

training. 

Withmgton works 

as an engineer 

associate to the 

construction office, 



Paving the way 



Matt Binter 

I w lagan 




City to hear 2008 budget, 
discuss revenue sources 



By Corene Brisendine 

KASSASStArt.inLltCtAN 

The Manhattan City 
Commission will review the 
2008 budget proposal and 
ethics policies update to- 
night at City Hall. 

Hemic Itaycn, direc- 
tor of finance in Manhat- 
tan, will give a presentation 
on the city budget for 2008 
and some items for 2009. 
according to the city coun- 
cil agenda 

"This Tuesday is just a 
study session," said |ason 
Hilgers, assistant city man 
ager "They walk through 
the revenue sources in the 
city." 

Brian Williams, man- 
agement assistant in the 
city manager's office, will 



present updates to the et ti- 
ki policy plan the city has 
been working on The pro- 
posed principles include 
transparency, integrity, 

quality, stewardship, fair- 
ness and equity, according 
to the agenda 

"It has been proposed 
| that there he two policies]: 
one for city stall, but also 
| one lnr| elected ■ 
Hilgers said 

The city typically holds 
work session* <ni the sec 
ond and fourth Tuesday of 
each month. 

Since January has five 
Tuesdays, officials did not 
meet on the first Tuesday. 
moving the work sessions 
back a week. Hilgers said 

The meeting will he at 5 
tonight at City Hall 




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PAGE 4 



OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 29. 2008 



Celebrate the past 

Historical events should not be disregarded, forgotten 




JOE 
VOSSEN 



In classrooms and 
homes, on campuses and 
newsstands, the story of 
our past 
is disap- 
pearing 
At a time 
when cit- 
izens 
have ac- 
cess to 
more in- 
forma- 
tion than 
any time 
in histo- 
ry, people 
are ex- 
hibiting less of a grasp on 
just that: our history 

The celebration ol our 
American past seems to be 
dying as numbers roll in 
depicting our society's his- 
torical illiteracy One 2006 
study by the Inter-College 
Studies Institute adminis- 
tered a 60- question gen- 
eral U.S. history exam to 
14,000 college freshmen 
They averaged an F 

What is eroding our 
national memory? The 
problem lies in the way 
history is taught. Many 
courses are exercises in 
memorization of dates, 
names and places Instrut 
tors do not sufficiently en- 
courage the closer study 
of the colorful characters 
and incredible events that 
make our past a rich sub- 
ject 

As historian David 
McCullough, author of 
the Pulitzer Prize-winning 
presidential biographies 
"Truman" and "John Ad- 
ams." said, if it's made a 
matter of dates and mem- 
orization of obscure pro- 
visos and ancient treaties, 
if it's made boring, if it's 
made dull, how can you 
blame anyone for turning 
away from it'" 



So what approach 
should our educators 
use? Teachers should 
make history come alive 
through storytelling They 
should bring history to 
life by painting a picture 
of events and people on 
a more emotional level - 
not fust as cold, static facts 
in a textbook 

No tale is as fascinat- 
ing as the American pag- 
eant, said Charles Sanders, 
associate professor of his- 
tory. 

i approach American 
history as a story." Sand 
ers said "It's a great sto- 
ry, full of drama, humor, 
sadness, joy. excitement - 
the whole range of human 
emotions" In his class- 
room, Sanders said 
he approaches 
the sub 
ject by 
urging 
students to 
"capture 
not only 
the facts of 
history, 
but the . 
feel as 
well" 

Too 
many of us view 
history as we do 
chemistry or math : 
the facts are fixed, and 
the results only 
come out one way 
But no event in our 
history was preor- 
dained The best history 
teachers are the ones who 
emphasize this They raise 
interest in the subject, 
and their students critical- 
ly evaluate and retain in- 
formation They make stu- 
dents ask, "Why did this 
happen? How were they 
feeling'*" 

Consider if the Rev 
olulionary VVar had been 



lost. Imagine that Rosa 
Parks had not defiant 
ly stayed seated on that 
Montgomery, Ala , bus in 
1955 

Our past was shaped 
by people who are little 
different than we are, but 
who were placed in a po- 
sition that enabled them 
to change the trajectory of 
America. When students 
realize that our most fa- 
mous (and infamous) fig- 
ures were ordinary people 
with real fears and hopes, 
they become more inter- 
ested; and raising interest 
is the answer to reviving 
the celebration of our his- 
tory. 

History can be more 
fascinating than any 



movie, TV show or vid- 
eo game. We must ad- 
mit, however, it is in direct 
competition with those 
media for our attention. 

Luckily, Sanders said, 
history is not only enter- 
taining but thought-pro- 
voking when it is. "that 
sort which historian Bruce 
Catton has described as 
'history with the blood in 
it.'" 

We cannot allow our 
history - the glaring fail- 
ures or incredible success- 
es - to be pushed aside. 
How can we deny our- 
selves this lens? 

It can bring our pres- 
ent and future into per- 
spective. An apprecia- 
tion of history builds bet- 



ter citizens and gives us a 
fresh outlook on the prob- 
lems of the present, and 
the whole history of this 
continent and its people 
should be learned because 
it is fun 

It is an exploration 
into centuries of struggle 
and debate thai define our 
shared experience as di 
verse citizens of the Unit- 
ed States. 

It is a story that might 
make us embarrassed or 
proud;, worried or hope- 
ful, but it is our story. We 
should never forget it 



Jo* V0M*fl ii a senior in political 
science. Please send comment! to 
opinion ■ i ipuo. kui.tdu. 







Christina Forsberrj | COILEGIAN 



Media spotlight should focus on relevant issues 




TYLM 
SMITH 



Information is important Wars 
have been fought over the free flow 
of information, to stop destructive 
information and 
because of unnec- 
essary information 

The rea- 
son students go 
to school is to ac- 
quire information 
about something 
that someone will 
later pay them to 
use. The articles 
in this newspaper 
are filled with it - 
some readers might 
know, and some might not 

With this endless and ever- 
changing flow of data, it is almost 
impossible to be well-informed on 
multiple issues. This fact, coupled 
with the dazzling display of me 
dia coverage and commentary every 
time a presidential candidate does 
something - does anything - is mak 
ing it impossible. 

Every news network, late show 
and piece of satire is pushing out 
opinions like they're getting com- 



mission Everyone is dissecting the 
smallest aspects of everyone else's 
campaign If a candidate sneezes 
now. the media compares it to Pom- 
peii, tf another says "bless you." then 
they've just declared open war 

The 2008 electoral coverage 
needs to slow down. With TV and 
the Internet so saturated with it, it's 
almost impossible to get away from 

Without a doubt, people should 
be informed on the issues and values 
of candidates - that is not the point 
The point is, the issues should be 
discussed, not what candidates are 
buying at the grocery store 

For example, 1 know Sylvester 
Stallone is supporting presidential 
candidate Sen John McCain in the 
2008 election. 

I found this little gem through 
the idiot factory known as FoxNews 
com Why would 1 ever care who 
Rocky wants for president ? How is 
this remotely relevant? It's not like 
he's Bruce Springsteen or anything. 

How can we focus on the impor 
tant things with all of this going on? 
The mudslinging on TV has reached 
a level never seen before, and what's 



worse, it's not even between 
the candidates It is from 
Chris Matthews and Bill 
O'Reilly, [on Stewart 
and Steven Colbert and 
a thousand people in 
the middle There is so 
much backseat driving 
going on, who knows 
where we'll end up. 

In the past - even 20 
years ago - this couldn't 
have happened A news 
paper can't yell at you But 
in this new age where al- 
most any information is ac- 
cessible at lightning speed, 
how much is too much? 

Where should we draw the line 
on this barrage of social commen 
tary? With the constant growth of 
technology and communication, it 
can only get more intense But for 
now at least, we need to put a damp 
er on all the unnecessary informa- 
tion. 



Tyler Smith u a junior in Eng lish. Please tend 
commtnti to opinion* (put. tiu.edu. 




TO THE POINT 



Donating blood, plasma great ways to give, receive 



Donating blood 
through the American 
Red Cross can save lives 
But donat- 
ing plasma 
can save lives 
too - with the 
incentive of 
monetary pay- 
ment. 

Though 
some students 
donate blood to give 
back to their communi- 
ties, students who donate 
plasma feel the same 
way about their dona- 
tions 

In light of January be- 
ing National Blood DO- 



TO THE MINT nan 
editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after 
a majority opinion 
is formed This Is 
the Collegian's 
official opinion. 



nor Month, some might 
donate for more spe- 
cific reasons, for exam- 
ple, a shortage of 
blood in their eth- 
nic community. 
Or simply giving 
the gift of life to a 
victim who expe- 
riences extreme 
blood loss because 
of an accident 
Some also might 
choose to donate blood 
because it is a much 
quicker process than do- 
nating plasma Donating 
plasma can take up to 
four hours the first time 
and around an hour on 



the following visits, while 
donating blood can take 
less than 10 minutes. 

However, with the 
prices of tuition and gas 
continuing to rise, col- 
lege students are turning 
to plasma banks when 
looking for quick cash. 

Agencies like the 
American Red Cross are 
facing competition from 
for-profit blood plasma 
collection centers, which 
pay donors an average of 
$9 to $20 per donation. 

For-profit centers be- 
gan targeting college stu- 
dents in the late 1970s, 
and it is a strategy that 



research suggests still 
works today 

An Ohio Universi- 
ty study of 411 college 
students ages 18 to 22 
found 10 percent of stu- 
dents have sold their 
blood plasma to a for- 
profit collection agen- 
cy at least once. In that 
group, three out of five 
are former Red Cross do- 
nors who stopped do- 
nating blood when they 
started selling their plas- 
ma. 

The American Red 
Cross tried different 
ways of attracting college 
students like raffling off 



Apple iPod Nanos and 
$1,000 scholarships to 
students who donate. 

They are even adver- 
tising on popular net- 
working sites like XtyS- 
pace.com and Facebook. 
com. Many states, in- 
cluding Kansas, have 
dropped their donor age 
to 16. 

So what is a poor col- 
lege student to do? Do- 
nate blood when you 
can There is usually a 
blood drive only once 
a semester, and in the 
meantime, you could get 
paid for donating plasma 
to a good cause. 



THE FOURUM 

785 -39S-4444 

The Campus Foufum Is the 

Collegian's anonymous call-in 

system. The Fourum is edited to 

eliminate vulgar, racist, obscene 

and libelous comments. The 
comments are not the opinion 

of the Collegian nor are they 
endorsed by the editorial staff 



Good thing the AGR boys aren't friends with 
the Theta freshmen 

Charles, brush your teeth 

Lt, Dan, what happened to your kegs, tt 
M 

Strip clubs Jre rrtarded 

When it comes to "Meet the Spartans' ot 
strip clubs, it's 'Meet the Spartans," because 
strip dubs are special 

Bros More hoes You can publish it, I think 
ke-f would be cool with It 

To the guy who left the bike unlocked: 
thanks. II made my hip to diss a lot quicker 

Annette, you re not Came Btadsluw 

Don t sell your tickets to KLJ tans 

Wow, your fourum was quite large yester- 
day That's what she said 

Making the fourum twite in one day is 
tunny Twue in one day for the same thing 
ts an error. 

To the kid on the unkycle: You made me 
happy today 

Harvey Keitei would be a good fattier. He 
would be stem but (air 

I was |ust In line it Panda Express, and one ol 
the servers was telling her friend about what 
kind of ant i - did rrheal medicine she s on Now 
I can't eat this chow metn 

If they got rid of the letter Delta from the 
Greek alphabet, it would gel rid of three of 
my wont fayorrte things: cakulus, chemistry 
andTn-Delta 

To the two guys singing Queen in Aggieville: 
stop 

does it count as studying abroad when you 
walk into Cardwell? 

Tkt Goo Goo Dolls can I ure cancer 

I |ust ww Michael Beasley walk into the 
Stum 

111 pounds? Yeah. nght. 

I paid 1 5 minutes for the meter 20 minutes 
before my class started Thai was not a good 
idea. 

* State cannot and will not beat KU on 
Wednesday 

hey, fourum, is it OK to ask a girl out on 
a date in your English class before you're 
facebook mends' 

There are two cops standing in the middle 
of Denison, and it just took everything I had 
not to tut them 

K Start* athletic department: Please make a 
life-sued poster of luis Colon running 

Ti bell with the Stunt guy. 

h* you like the word Stum, you can lust get 
the hell out 

For the full Fourum, go to 
www.* if tf*r oWegwn . ram . 



Collegian 



Jonathan G*ri *n 
HM(M 

Silent Sim* | MKAdlhti fOllO* 

Willow Williamson | MtNUIlHi EOltOlt 

Own Ktnnctfy | WWS EDCTM 

M»nnihiHtfc|(0*MMIil 

Stott Glrtrd | (OPtlHill 

AnrwlM Cjwltit | MUHIMEDm EDI 10* 

Shell* EIIIi|hmpuS font* 

Akn P*«« | (HE E0CE EDITOR 

SriiKJon Sleintrt | metro EDITOR 

K*l»y Noel I OPINION [TJITOR 

Wendy Haun I SPOWi fill TOR 

JoelJellllon |\P0«IS EDITOR 

Nicole Johnston | SPEI IAI SuliONS (WTO* 

Tyler Reynold! | AD MANAGED 



KANSAS STATE COUEGiAN 

nrvn@ipub.kiu.edu 

Reekie 1 03. Manhattan. KS 56506 

DISPLAY ADS 78S-5U-6SM 

(IASSIF1EDADS 785 S32-6S5S 

DELIVERY 785-S12-6S5S 

NfWSROOM 785 532-6556 



UTTfMTO THE EDITOR 

the Collegian welcomes your letters to the 
editor They ran be submitted by e-mail 
tofmws^spc/o tsu.rvJu, ot in person to 
Nediie 116 Please include your full name, 
year in school and major, letters should be 
limited to 250 words All submitted letters 
might be edited lor length and clarity 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



PAGE 5 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2008 



Hygiene hints 




HlurtriltonibyChrlHlnjForsbwg | (.OLLI&IAN 




Healthy personal habits more than daily routine 



ByRyntWItt 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Hygiene probably is not something that 
crosses college students' minds every day, 
but it is something they probably deal with 
by showering and brushing their teeth daily. 
Here are some lips that might help improve 
basic hygiene and make life more pleasurable 
for everyone. 



TEETH 

Plaque is the bacteria thai causes cavities. 
According to healthyteethorg, it is the only 
bacteria in the mouth that causes cavities 

The site also points out a diel heavy in 
sugar is harmful, because plaque uses sugar as 
a form of energy So, the more sugar a person 
eals, the more plaque they will have on their 
teeth 

Solutions to this plaque problem are reg 
ular trips to the dentist and brushing and 
flossing teeth twice daily, for at least two and 
half to three minutes, according to the site. 
Also, the Web site said people need to keep 
a healthy diet because it will help in avoiding 
sugary foods 

Something students might not know 
about alcoholic beverages is what (hey can do 
to their teeth. 

"Drinking alcohol will have a similar ef- 
fect on your teeth as drinking a soda," said 
Theresa Doyle, health educator at Lafene 
Health Center "Both [ drinks | have sugar that 
could build up and cause cavities " 

This includes beer, not just cocktail 
drinks or wine, though those drinks can be 
worse because they add acidity to the prob- 
lem, according to lifetips.com 

The site provides lips on how to help a 
person who isn't focused on keeping their 
pearly whites clean Leave the toothbrush on 
the pillow as a friendly reminder that il is tune 
for a teeth brushing. Chew sugarless gum or 
swish water between drinks, because it will 
help increase saliva flow, rinse away sugars 



WHAT YOU DIDN'T 
KNOW ABOUT HYGIENE 

I.Thehunian body is home to some 1,000 
species of bacteria There are more acflM on 
one body than people in the United States 

2. Antibac tertii soap is no more effective at 
prevent Ing infection than regular soap, and 
tridosan ( the active Ingredient) can affect 
human sei hormones. 

), There soofrw-second rule" when it 
comes to dropping food on the ground 
Bacteria need no tune at ill to twit animate 
rood. 



4. Soto gets Its name from the mytho 
logical Mount Sapo fat ami wood ash 
from animal sacrifices there washed into 
the TnVt Mm, treating a rudimentary 
tleanlng agent that aided women doing 
I heir washing. 

5. A seventh grader in Florida recently 
won her school science fan by proving 
there are more bacteria in tee machine', at 
fast-food restauiants than in toilet bowl 
water 

6. K study of more than 1 1.000 children 
determined that an overly hygienic 
environment increases the risk of ec/ema 
and asthma 



7. The first true toothbrush, consisting of 
Siberian pig hair hristles wiied into carved 
utile bone handles, was invented in China 
in 1*98 But teeth brushing didn't become 
routine ki the United Slates until rt was 
enforced on soldiers during World War II. 

t. University of Aruona researchers 
determined Ihat FV remotes are the worst 
carriers of bactetia in hospital rooms, worse 
even than toilet handles Remotes spread 
antibiotic- resistant Staphylococcus, which 
lontribulf s to the 90,000 annual deafts 
from infection acquired in hospitals 



— Discovery Maqaunt 



and decrease the latent acid in the mouth, 
FACE/SKIN 

Keeping skin healthy and clean is one 
way for a person to maintain high a Mtf-N 
teem, positive mental altitude and strong self- 
confidence according Uj skin care-tips from 
dermatologist.com. 

The Web site offers many lips to keep fac- 
es from getting too oily and full of acne Peo 
pie should have a balanced diet. Slav hydral 
ed by drinking eight to 10 glasses of water or 
juice a day, exercise, get at least seven to eight 
hours of sleep, manage stress, and avoid a leu 
hoi and drugs 

But, according to Doyle, there is pari 
of our skin thai students forget about their 
hands. 

"One important aspect of hygiene thai 
may get neglected is hand-washing," she said. 
"Hand-washing is essential for preventing the 
spread of germs and bacteria Another way to 
help keep germs al bay is lo cough in your 
sleeve. 

Many people sneeze or cough in their 
hands, and proceed lo open doors, use shared 
computers, and touch a variety of surfac- 
es without washing their hands first, which 
spreads germs" 



SHOWERING/HAIR 



I nr people in ilk I I tiled Slates, ShOWCitug 
sounds basic, and most people do il daily, but 
Doyle said the number of times a person show 
ers per week is actually a cultural thing. Some 
cultures shower every day and others shower 
once per week. 

She also said college students usual- 
ly shower every day out of habii. and because 
they don't want people to think they smell. 

When hair doesn't gel washed, it collects 
oil und dirt According to Lynne Chapman, ed- 
itor of hair al BeUaOnShie.com, people should 
wash their hair only as often as necessary. 

11 ii person's hair looks good on the sec- 
ond day and doesn't feel dirty, there is no rea- 
son to wash it." she said 

She also said younger people usually don't 
lake can of their hair as well as older people. 

"Younger bodies naturally produce stron- 
ger hair/' she <,aid " Younger people tend to use 
un ire hair color and do more work with appli- 
ances such as a flat iron because they haven't 
WW any ill effects - yet 

"Older people have often learned from 
experience what causes damage lo their hair 
flic hair naturally starts to lose elasticity and 
strength as we age, so older people are doing 
mure to take care of whal they have" 



MUSIC REVIEW 



"Juno" soundtrack proves to be just as entertaining as film 



"Juno Soundtrack" 
••••• 

Review by A lev Pea* 

The "|uno" sound 
track is about as charming as 
the movie. It's mix-tape feel 
croons of young love, friend- 
ships and general teen angst. 

Most people who pay at- 
tention to mainstream en- 
tertainment know "Juno" 
is about a 16-year-old girl 
named Juno (aka Junebug), 
who unexpectedly gets preg- 
nant with her high-school best 
friend. Surprisingly, neither 
the movie nor soundtrack are 
depressing, despite the sober- 
ing subject. 

In many scenes, the mu- 
sic couldn't fit the charac- 
ters and moods better For ex 
ample, during the descrip 



AII115TS ON SOUNDTRACK; 



brrrlou*Mki> 
K*v* Dawn* 

IhrKMi 




lion of Juno's boyfriend, who 
is an accomplished track run- 
ner, the song "A Well Respect- 
ed Man" by The Kinks plays 
Or when the catchy, loe tap 
ping "All 1 Want Is You" by 
Barry Louis Polisar accompa 
nies the film, surely audience 
members share a collective 
sigh uf "aw" With lyrics like 
(he following: "If I was a flow 



AllllTpMfc 
MtturlfmMrjfflP*K 



er grossing wild and free /All 
I'd want is you to be my sweet 
honey bee/And if I was a tree 
growing tall and green /All I'd 
want is you to shade me and 
be my leaves," how could they 
resist? 

Ellen Page, the actress 
who portrayed Juno, appar- 
ently helped out wiih the 
soundtrack. In a media inter- 



view, director |ason Re it man 
expressed how much input 
and inspiration Page had with 
the movie and music 

"At OIM point, I asked KI 
len Page before we started 
shooting, 'what do you think 
Juno listens to? And she said 
The Moldy Peaches' She 
went on my computer, played 
the songs, and I fell in love 
with il." Kcitman said in the 
interview. "I got in touch wiih 
Kimya Dawson of The Moldy 
Peaches, and she started semi 
ing me her work, which was 
beautiful, and that became a 
loi of the soundtrack" 

Dawson, singer/song 
writer of The Moldy Peach 
es, brings an appropriate ele- 
ment to the compilation. She 
has a light, juvenile-sounding 
voice. Her songs "Loose Lips." 
"Tire Swing," "Sleep" and "So 



Nice So Smart" sound like 
they're coming directly from 
the mind of a teenager. 

"You're so nice, and 
you re mi smart /You're such a 
good friend I hafta break your 
heart Tell you lhat I love 
you /then I'll tear your world 
apart," Dawson sings in "So 
Nice So Smart" 

Alongside Ihe sweet love 
songs and humorous lyrics re 
luting to young life, the sound- 
track HO pravMai ample old- 
er music that allows different 
generations to rclale These 
bands include The Velvet Un- 
derground. Buddy Holly and 
Sonic Youth. 

As if the movie wasn't ap- 
pealing enough, the sound- 
track is catchy and impelling 
and much better than any- 
thing else released un CD so 
far this ye. n 



NEW RELEASES 
CDS 



Jk'\%. 



> Wz 



n '>/>*</ J" '"/ 



Symphony' Sarah Srighlmari 

-Vlwtt lift In Tuscany" I DVD/CDI Sarah 
fcightman, Kenny G etal 

"2008 Grammy Nominees* Various MM 

'Moment Of forever' Willie Nelson 




'The Bedlam in Goliath Ihe Mats Valla 
"Run" (w/ bonus DVDI loe Jackson 
"Vampire Weekend" Vampire Weekend 
"Day Trip" Pat MethenvTrio 




'I Stand' Idina Meruel 

"ItsTooUte To Stop Now; Live' i." Hi 
Van Morrison 



■ 1: Hon Stop Dance 
Party" Hannah Montana 

DVDS 

'Comanche Moon: Second Chapter in tone 
some Dove" 

Jess* Stone Sea Change" 




"Beowulf " The Directors Cut ilwo Dist 
Special Collector sttfilicm) 

The Da nwlmo limited 

Death at a Funeral' 




"]0 Days of Night" 

'Ghost Hunters Season 1 Part 2' 




"Justice League - The New frontier' (Two- 
Oiic Special Cdrlwn) 

— imaion.t om 



i 



PAGE 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2008 



MySpace, Facebook users must use caution 
when dealing with potential online predators 



By fcrk Da vis 
KANSAS STXTVCOUIGMM 

For many, MySpace.com is 
an online forum used to meet 
people arid keep in touch with 
old friends There are. howev- 
er, those who use the site for a 
much different purpose 

Because of the easy acces- 
sibility of users, some exploit 
the Web site to prey on chil- 
dren and young adults, taking 
advantage of the easy access to 
many potential victims 

Ua'rs are allowed to set 
up profiles under almost any 
name, and these can be set up 
to give the allusion the user is 
actually someone else. Often, 
these are the profiles used to 
play pranks and stalk underage 
users. 

To combat the overwhelm- 
ing amount of misuse in its site, 
MySpace has agreed lo insti- 
tute more than 60 changes in 
the site to make it safer for all 
users. 

MySpace worked with at- 
torney generals from 49 states 



and also the District of Colum- 
bia to make the changes 

Kansas Attorney Gener- 
al Paul Morrison was among 
those who supported the agree- 
ment 

"| Morrison) felt the large 
amount of anonymity on the 
site combined with few restric- 
tions were a recipe for disaster," 
said Ashley Anstaett. spokes- 
woman for Morrison. 

Anstaett said the agree- 
ment reached is not a law and 
is nut binding at all 

"If | MySpace employees] 
don't follow what they said 
they would follow, slates could 
seek legal resolution," said Ans- 
taett 

Among the changes agreed 
upon include the creation of a 
new high school only site that 
will be much more restrictive 
about the users it allows in. An- 
staett said 

Many of the new measures 
are aimed at making signing up 
harder if a user is underage as 
well as making sure the content 
on the pages of all its users is 



appropriate for all ages 

Also, parents will be able 
to submit the e-mail address of 
their children lo a block list, so 
the children cannot sign up for 
an account on the site, accord- 
ing to a press release from the 
Kansas Attorney General's of- 
fice 

Many of the piedators 
get in contact with the under 
age children by making com- 
ments on the in -profile mes- 
sage boards as well as sending 
messages, which are more pri- 
vate 

Another problem with the 
site is the posting of indecent 
material by users This abuse is 
more widespread and therefore 
affects all users, not fust under- 
age users 

Some of the changes were 
implemented immediately, and 
MySpace is working on inte- 
grating more and more as time 
goes on 

' I haven't seen any of the 
changes, but f hope they're 
working." said Angela Whay. 
senior in speech communica- 



tions 

Whay, a registered MyS- 
pace user for about a year and 
a half, said she has never re- 
ceived any messages from men 
trying to prey upon her, but 
when she received a message 
she deemed inappropriate, she 
reported it 

After reporting the mes- 
sage. Whay said she did not 
receive any acknowledgment 
from MySpace about the re- 
port 

According to a press re- 
lease from Morrison's of- 
fice, the social networking site 
vowed to respond to all such 
reports 

Whay also said she has not 
received an e-mail or any sort 
of message from MySpace as 
lo what the changes will entail, 
but she did say she gets some 
information from a scrolling 
message box on her homepage 

The only stale that did not 
sign on was Texas, and no one 
from the Texas attorney gener 
al's office could be reached for 
comment 



STEROIDS | Records, 
stats should remain 



Continued from Page 8 

read something like the fol- 
lowing: 

"During the 10 -year pe- 
riod from 1995 to 2005, 
many players in Major 
League Baseball used ste- 
roids and other perfor- 
mance-enhancing substanc- 
es. Consequently, this period 
■ forever known as the Ste- 
roid Era Keep this in mind 
as you turn the following 
pages, as it is up lo you to 
form your own opinion. All 
records and si ati sties are le- 
gitimate and fully supported 
by Major League Baseball." 

ll is obvious MLB Com- 
missioner Bud Selig turned 
j blind eye to the issue of 
steroids in baseball. After 
the first Congressional in- 
vestigation, Major League 
Baseball adopted a new pol- 



icy that seems to be work- 
ing. The three-strike policy 
gels the message lo players 
that there will be no toler- 
ance for using performance- 
enhancing substances 

Slowly, but surely, base- 
hall is ridding itself of per- 
formance-enhancing sub- 
stances 

The first step was to ac- 
knowledge the steroid era 
Now. it is time that baseball 
moves past il The past is 
the past. It can't be changed 
It can't be fixed. Baseball 
needs to let it go and cele- 
brate the game for what it is 
today. 



Jonathan Wright is a senior in pr* 
prohmional architectural enqi- 
net ring. Mease send comment! to 
ipcr fi t ipui tsu.tdlt, 



ADVERTISING 532-6560 



KANSAS STATE 




Creative concentration 




list* Alderton | COLLEGIAN 

Jason SttmnMr, sophomore in art, works on a contour line drawing 
for Drawing I in the Bosco Student Plara on Monday afternoon. 



COLDS | Cleanliness, 
water boost immunity 



Continued from Pjge 1 

help keep you cold-free 
In addition to preventing 
sickness, exercise also can 
make you feel better when 
you are already sick Just 
make sure you stay hydrat- 
ed and be sure not lo over 
exert yourself 

If you are going to the 
Kec and you are sick, make 
sure you wipe down ev- 
ery machine you touch 
with the disinfectant, and 
use the antibacterial hand 
gel provided in the weight 
room and at the service 
area desks. If you want to 
work out in the Rec and 
are weary of the sick peo- 
ple around you, then wipe 



down your machine before 
you use it, and don't forget 
about washing your hands, 
too. 

Last but certainly not 
least, stay hydrated. If you 
give your body the tools 
it needs to stay healthy, 
it won't let you down 
,When you start to skimp 
on things your body netjds. 
that's when you gel sick. 
So follow these tips to keep 
you healthy and productive 
during a season of sickness 



Kendall Hall is i senior In kinasiol 
ogy and a certified personal trainer 
at the Peters Recreation Complex. 
Please tend comment! to tport j a 



PLASMA [ 
steps vital for health 



Continued from Page 1 

down and watch television or 
read magazines - it's pretty 
easy," she said 

Division of Biology in- 
structor Dana Tbwnsend said 
donating plasma could cause 
a lack of protein. 

Plasma contains essential 
proteins that might be harder 
for the body to make after a 
donation, Townsend said 

'This is why they don't 
let you donate every day." she 
said. "This is to make sure the 
body has plenty of time to 
make new proteins" 

Townsend said the pro- 
teins hold the fluid in the plas- 
ma, and it is important for 



people lo drink liquids after 
donating. 

"If a person goes to a 
place that rehydrates you, 
you'll be fine, and the | plasma 
service] here does." she said 
'This one in town is good" 

Jonathan Scott, junior in 
marketing, learned about plas- 
ma donation by reading an ad- 
vertisement in the newspaper 

He said he realized how 
donating plasma can not only 
put extra cash in his pocket 
but also can have a positive af- 
fect on his community 

"Of course, there is the 
money, but it is also good to 
know you're helping out some- 
one you'll never meet, thanks 
to giving plasma," Scott said. 



CLONE | Meat to be 
unmarked in stores 



Continued from Paget 

the FDA came after more 
than seven years of research 
and about a year after the 
FDA released a statement 
that cloned meat was as 
safe as meat from naturally 
raised animals 

Since scientists first suc- 
cessfully cloned the first an- 
imal - a sheep named Dol- 
ly - 10 years ago, the top- 
ic has been a hotbed of con- 



troversy- In a national sur- 
vey conducted in Decem- 
ber 2006 by the Universi- 
ty of Maryland, 63 percent 
of people that were polled 
said they would contin- 
ue to buy meat products if 
they learned they were from 
cloned animals. 

However, in Ihe same 
poll, two-thirds of the peo 
pie said they are uncomfort- 
able with the cloning pro- 
cess. 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 





MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 murai ev- 
•ry person equal oppor- 
tunity In homing with- 
out distinction on ac- 
count at race. aax. famil- 
ial statue, military *ta 
tua. dieatoiltry, 
aga. color, national Ori- 
gin or ancestry Viola- 
tions should be re- 
ported to trio Director of 
Human Raaourcaa at 
City Hall, 765-587-2440. 

BRAND NEW luxury apart 
ments dose to campue 
Granite oountertope. Wain- 
leas appeancee. 
dryer, pool, hot tub, gym. 
business center theater 
785-537 2098 collegia! 
avilla.com 

EXCELLENT FOUR-BED- 
ROOM In Aggievike. 
$1500, August I, Went a 
great view at Aggieville 
with shopping, services, 
KSU at your fingertips? 
Call lodayl 765-320-5300 

NEWER 1644 Anderson 
three -bedroom, two bath- 
room, personal washer/ 
dryer, one -half bkx* weal 
ot KSU available August 
lit I960' month 765- 
410-1665 



ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartments in new build- 
ings Close to campus 
end Aggieville Available 
June and August 2006 
No pets Call John el 785- 
313-7473. 

PARK PLACE Apartments 
summer fall leasing Best 
deal In town on one and 
two-bed room Student 

specials it leased by 
Fabruary5 785-539-2951 

THREE-BEDRUOM AU- 
GUST leases One WocK 
to campus' Aggieville 
Central air. lull kitchen, 
washer/ dryer on site 785- 
539-4641. 

TWO-BEDROOM. 
CLOSE to campus 
Washer and dryer 1660 
par month 785-341-4496 

TWO-BEDROOM TWO 

hettiroom apartment two 
blocks from cam- 
pua I Vary nice new con- 
struction. Inexpensive util- 
ities Win lease qulcfctyt 
Sorry, no peta Contact 
Amber at 765-313-1607 
or atachaea gmatl.com 



NOW LEASING 
FOR FALL 



■ i i Apt 

,m;:>i I 
I 



0pe n Saturday 103 

537-9064 

r hiHHfirtstandrental.com 




Spacious 
Duplexes 



Each duple* features 

WBli-inclosfits, 

ail kitchen appliances, 

washer/dryer, 

off street parking, 

phone and cable 

connections in every room. 

security lighting, 

Hash and lawn care 

Security deposit is tha tame 
as one month siant 

One Year Lease period 
begins August 1st 

4 Styles 

4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths 

2.600 Sq Ft 

Monde Condo 

2 Living Rooms, Walk out 

upper dark, Large iludy 

pttica. Structured cable. 

Spacious laundry room 

QNLYsT.SSO/mo 

4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths 
l.BOOSq Ft 

Hat lend i 

2 Living Rooms, Spacious 

laundry room 

ONlVtlJSuVmo 

a Bedrooms, 2 Baths 

1,600 Sq Ft 

1 Leveia Study office 

uNLYiUSO/mo 

* Bedrooms. 2 Baths 

1 .300 Sq Ft 

ONLYIUSO/mo 



C mt m nl m t awe I 



FOUR -BEDROOM. TWO 
bathroom. Irving room, 
kitchen, washer' dryer, 
fliahwastw, $290/ per- 
son Call 765-410-2916. 
leave voice mail 



D., : JIJ-07»i 
M74IM 




AVAILABLE JUNE and 
August. Two. three, tour, 
live, end six bedrooms 
Close ro campus No pets 
weshar/ dryer. 785-317- 
SQ26. 

AvaILaBle 1 JOB au- 

gust Throe to five/ six- 
bedroom houses full 
kitchen, waaher/ dryer, 
central air 765-639-4641 
FIVE, l-OUR, three, end 
two-bedroom homes 
June and Way leases No 
smoking. No pats. 785- 
776-3184 

M V E B E Dfi 6(JM 
HOUSES close to cam- 
pua and Aggieville 
Washer/ rjryer, stove, re- 
frigerator, dishwasher, car- 
peting, two bathroom air 
condition oft- street park, 
trig rsosonebie retes no 
pets Augusl leases Call 
now tor best selection 316 
772-3171 



Need a 
New 

Place to 
Live? 



Check the 
Classifieds! 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 

785-532-6555 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 29,2008 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PAGE 1 



I I I I 
1' I" 



1 



II II 

:: v m - 



■ i 1 1 ■ • ■ 

a J I ■ i ■ 



V 

Help Wanted 



V 

Jhy-vWii'J 



LET'S RENT 



Rent Apt Unfiirnahea Rent Apt Unfurnished 



LANDSCAPf: DESIGNER PRESCHOOU NURSERY 
and Landscape Foreman position* avHiabt* tor to- 
needed CompeBttve pay eel college student* on 
and benefits Please con- Wednesday and/ or Sun- 
lad Athen's Services In- 
c ol fopeka KS 755-232- 
t55a or wv 
vices com 



AUGUST PRELEASEING 

serval units dose to KSU 
Some only one year old 
All apliances including 
washer/ dryer energy etli- 
cent apartments off-street 
parking call tor location/ 
BlttM 788-77H1M 

www.wltkaapta.corn 

AVAILABLE JUNE; One 
three, tour, and live bed 
room houses Close to 
campus Reserve now tor 
best selection 785-539- 
3672 Loc si landlord 

ONE TWO. and three- 
bedroom apartments an- 
celleot condition Me»! to 
K- Slate and Aogiewrie rea- 
sonable rata* private 
parking, attentive land- 
lord, no pats. June and 
August leases TNT 
Rental. 785 539-5508 



ONE. TWO. and three- 
bedroom apartments naw 
oonatructlon nam to K- 
Stata and Aggievilte up- 
scale new e r apanmems 
washer,' dryer. dish- 
washer, central air pri- 
vaia parking, security light- 
ing, no pets June and Au> 
gust leases TNT Rentals 
7B5-539-5508 




Rent-Houm 



FOUR. FIVE, six, seven, 
and eight -bed room 

houses excellent condi- 
tion nexl to It-State and 
Aggievilte Multiple 

krtchens and bathrooms, 
washer/ dryer dish- 
washer, central air, rea- 
son sMa rates, no pets 
June and Augusl leases 
TNT Rentals 785-539- 
0549 

NEW HOUSE, lour-oed- 
room. two bathroom, 
doss to campus, avail- 
•He August tst 1614 
Pane 7t5-304-o3IT 



NEWLY REMODELED 
three-bedroom, one bath- 
room, large garage. 1401 
Yuma 789-304-0387. 



Rent -Houses 



NEXT TO eampua. Avail- 
able now, June and Au- 
gust One, two. three, 
tout, rive, six. and nine- 
bedrooms Apartments, 
houses, and multiplanes 
No pats 7SS-537.7OS0. 



NICE BRITTNAV Ridge 
Townhorna. tour-bed- 
room, two and 1/2 bath, 
all appliances washer' 
dryer. August 1 No pets 
$980/ month 785-293- 
5197 



THR6E. FOUR, and ftve- 

bedrooms Dldnl gel the 
house you wanted last 
y*sr7 The good ones go 
last Cat 786- 34 1-06** 



day mornings at Faith 
Evangelical Free Church 
Wa have a flexible work 
ing erotronmem and great 
_ children to work with Pay 
is J7 10 an hour Contact 

LAW FIRM is seeking an Chns lor more Intorma- 

office assistant/ runner- i«jn, cftrts barke*»fetc- 

part-time, Menb*. hours manhattan.org or 785-776- 

availaMe Please submit 2066 

resume to Human Re ^^^^^^_^^^^^^ 

sources, 555 PoyhU Ave, 

Ste 240, Manhattan. 

Kansas. 66502 



PROGRAM ASSISTANT 
I Sunset Zoo). Starting 
Salary: 56 30. hour (Sea- 
sonal) Poetlton fleepon- 
To lacililate a 



HelpWanttd 



STEEL S PIPE Supply 
Company- Inventory Ana- 
lyst Assistant There is an 
immediate opening tor an 
Inventory analyst assis- 
tant at our corporate oh 
lice Position ts responsi- 
ble lor creating migration 
matenali. analysing and 
monilonng SAP software 
processes, and assisting 
In analysis ol warehouse 
cycle counting data Also 
support tor customer ser- 
vice and sales start Ouaa- 



MAINTENANCE variety ol high quality. MP 
WORKER I (Horttcui- anus generating, and edu 



ture). Starling Salary: 

112 22. hour (lull -time) 
Purpose: As- 



cational programs such as 
birthday partiea. cam- 
pouis, classes, and clubs, 
sists the Horticulture sec- as was aa live animal pro- 
lion in meeting rls ocfec- grams at Sunset Zoo Po- 
tives by providing labor, sltton also assists with the 
operating machinery, and supervision and training 
various divisional equip- volunteers Experience 
men! Assists Horticultur- Required: High school 
ist in routine landscape graduate ol GED re- 
Maintenance required to quired; plus background 
provide high quality munic- knowledge ot zoos, ani- 
ipal grounds facilities ser- mala, and current educa- 
vices and enpenences lo lion practices vital Excel- 
perk patrons Experience lent public speaking skills 



Required: Knowledge ol 
types and uses ol cont- 



end tfciUty to adapt to a 
variety ol audiences and 



Rent Houses 



FIVE/ THREE-BEDROOM 
house. couM be two sepa- 
rate groups, one group or 
one group ol eight One 
block oft east side Cen- 
tral air. two fuH kllchens. 
two washers/ dryers, two 
living areas 785-509-4641 

FOR RENT tour bed- 
rooms, two bath house 
Three blocks from cam- 
pus Augusl 1 lease 1420 
Vista Ln. 1400/ month 
washer/ dryer, an condi- 
tioning- Contact 913-556- 
2498 

HOUSE FOR rent Two 
blocks tram Aggteville 
dose to eampua Five 
bedroom, three bath, 
washer/ dryer included 
Available June 1 Call 
Brad 913-484-7541 

HOUSES MANY sues 
and prices. June or Au- 
gust 765-341-0666 

LARGE FOUR BED 
ROOM, two bathroom. 
carpeted rec room, Near 
Aggievilte/ campus, cen- 
tral air, washer/ dryer, dis- 
posal, fireplace, garage 
Available now. lease 
terms negotiable 786-317- 
5466 

ONE, TWO. three, and 
lour -bed room houses. 
Close to eampua/ also 
weetslde Available Im- 
mediately. No pets 785- 
(39-1979 or 785-313 
8296. 

ONE. TWO. three, four, 
five, and six-bedroom 
apartments and houses 
available tot June and Au- 
gust 7B5-539-829S 



Roommate Wanted 



QUIET NON-SMOKING, 
non-drmking female grad- 
uate seeks compatible 
roommale Must love 
dogs Washer/ dryer, 
DSL, phone, DISH cable 
$350 plus utilities or S50Q 
tor all 765-539-6856 or 
765-317-8742, 

LOOKING FOR female 
grad student to share 
three-bedroom two bath- 
room house. 6350. Lease 
& move-in date flexible E- 
mail alarsen'Sksu edu 

MALE ROOMMATE 

wanted House three 
blocks from campus. 
$325 00 plus one-fourth ol 
utilities Call 620-228- 
1345. 



V 

Help Wanted 





LARGE ROOM for rent 
tour-bedroom, two baths, 
arid one-fourth bills Call 

AC am 620-655-1101 

MALE SUBLEASE R 
needed: One-bedroom m 
a newer house No pels al- 
lowed. $360/ month plus 
utilities Call 620 222 
2761 

OnTbEDROOM IN tv«v 
bedroom house. Great 
roommale. February I- 
June I. 5385 per month 
includes all untitles except 
internet/ cable. Close to 
campus Price no.iu 

tiabka 7B 5 -4 27 -6638 

TWO BEDROOMS avail 
able in four bedroom 
apartment. University 

Crossing fully furnished 
very nice $329/ month 
Lease is now until Isle 
July N Praderio 144 »ys- 
hoo com 913-907-9566 



ATTENTION PARENTS/ 
Investors several invest- 
ment properties for 
near campus. All proper- 
ties are turn key with good 
rental history. Doug 785- 
313-5573 or email dkrae- 
merfrkau edu. 

•COMPLETE LIST ol 
houses dose to campus 
tor sale, larryllmbock- 
erSreeceandmchois com 
785-317-7713 Comer- 
stone Realty 




Em ploy men! /Careen 





1999 OAKWOOO Ihree- 
bedroom, two-bath, walk- 
in closets, garden tub, 
shed Located in Walnut 
Giove 18,000 or best oi- 
ler Call 785-317-4689 




FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed for two-bedroom 
duplex next 10 Ramblers 
Looking tor roommate 
preferably by February 1. 
Water and trash paid. 
$300' month 785-644- 
22B5 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted as soon aa possi- 
ble $300 per month plus 
hall uii lilies Own room 
and parking Please call 
316-204-7208 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to live with two 
clean, friendly girls Spa- 
cious three-bedroom 
house Includes washer/ 
dryer, dishwasher, and 
garage Close lo the sta- 
dium $366/ month 7B5- 
477-1135 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted $322 50 per 
fnonth plus naif utilities 
Own room and parking 
Close to Student Union. 
Please call 785-640- 
0815 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted $265 rem, close 
to campus 620-496-7670 

FEMALE WANTED 10 
share three-bedroom 

house $250 a month utili- 
ties paid. Call 785-537- 
4947. 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verily the financial po- 
tenllet ol advertise- 
ments In the Employ, 
men!/ Career classifies- 
Hon Reader* are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business opportu- 
nity with reasonable cau- 
tion The Collegian 
urge* our reader* to 
contact the Better Busi- 
ness Bureeu, 501 SE Jef- 
ferson Tooeke. KS 
686071190 785-232- 

0454 

A WELL established, pro- 
fessional landscaping 
company is seeking a reli- 
able individual for full-time 
employment in their land- 
scape installation division 
Prior landscape or farm 
experience pretened 
Above average wages 
commensurate with expe- 
rience and ability. Benefits 
include major medical, 
paid leave ana 40 1 k Ap- 
ply in person at 11524 
Landscape Ln.. St 
George, KS 68535 785- 
494-2418 or 785 776 
0397 

ACCOUNTANT/ CFO 

Due to our continued 
growth, ClvicPlus. the na- 
tions leading provider ol 
City, County, and School 
websites, has an opening 
lor a full-time accountant 
This career position re- 
quires the ability lo handle 
multiple tasks and priori 
ties while maintaining a 
posrllve and energetic atti- 
tude Accounting experl 
ence is requited, 
Peachlree experience pre 
foned Competitive pay 
plus benefit* including 
Health Dental. Paid Holi- 
days, Paid Vacation and 
401 K Email resume In Mi- 
crosoft Word or Text for- 
mal lo: 
jobiOeivicplus.com. 



APPOINTMENT SET- 

TER: CivicPlus is the na 
lions leading provider ol 
City, County and School 
websites We have full 
and part-time positions In 
Manhattan with significant 
income potential for the 
right Individual. This posi- 
tion involves calling poten- 
tial clients to setup wehl- 
nar appointments Pay Is 
$10/ hour plus $40 tor 
each wetxnar appoint- 
ment you setup Full-time 
benefits include Health, 
Dental, Paid Holidays. 
Paid Vacation and 401 K 
matching Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or Text 
format to 
jobs^Clvtcplus .com . 

ASSISTANT TENNIS 

COACH, Eisenhower Mid- 
dle School Salary set by 
teachers salary schedule 
Spring season Accepting 
resumes or letters wtlh 
qualifications until position 
is filled Apply to Manhat- 
tan Ogden USD 383. 
2031 Poynti Ave, Manhat- 
tan. KS 66502 786-587- 
2000. Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 

BARTENDING' $300 A 
day potential No experi- 
ence necessary. Training 
provided Call 1-800-965- 
6520 exl 144 

BILLING COORDINA- 
TOR: Due to our contin- 
ued growth, ClvicPlus, the 
nation's leading provider 
of City. County, and 
School websites, has an 
opening tor a lult-time 
Billing Coordinator This 
exciting opportunity re- 
quires the ability to handle